Galatians 3:19

/////////////////////////////////////////// New Testament Re: verbless conditional Gal. 3:18 what mood?

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 03:35 PM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/kKgeURDt6Ag/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

cwconrad wrote: No, I would say that neither Gal 3:19 nor 1 Cor 15:13, 16 is counter-factual. By definition counter-factual constructions are imaginary and hypothetical …

This discussion has taken an interesting turn. I have a follow on question. How do we identify contrary to fact conditionals in Koine? Do we do it based surface structural , i.e. formal characteristics? Statistics: Posted by Stirling Bartholomew — September 16th, 2012, 6:35 pm

/////////////////////////////////////////// Greek Language and Linguistics Re: Default word order in Greek

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 07:50 AM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/KWIpFgeilP8/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

Dear Ed, thank you – I’m interested in this book. Could you name the title ? Yours Peter, Germany Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — September 16th, 2012, 10:50 am

/////////////////////////////////////////// Books Re: Books on Greek word order?

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 05:54 AM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/EAZke30YmR8/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

There’s another discussion about this topic at:

viewtopic.php?f=47&t=669

Note especially Iver Larson’s paper linked there. Statistics: Posted by Paul-Nitz — September 16th, 2012, 8:54 am

/////////////////////////////////////////// New Testament Re: verbless conditional Gal. 3:18 what mood?

Posted: 16 Sep 2012 02:13 AM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/lv1fops-OO4/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

David Lim wrote: cwconrad wrote:[…]

On the other hand, if we assume that this is not a counterfactual condition at all, but a simple condition with no implications: (If x, then y). “If the inheritance is based on law, then it isn’t based on promise. But … ” The present indicative is appropriate then, and indeed no verb is more commonly elliptical than ἐστι(ν).

Yes this is what I meant, except that I thought the statement after this rendered the condition counter-factual at least from the writer’s perspective. To clarify, do you consider the conditions in 1 Cor 15:13,16 to be counter-factual? [1 Cor 15:13,16] ει δε αναστασις νεκρων ουκ εστιν ουδε χριστος εγηγερται […] ει γαρ νεκροι ουκ εγειρονται ουδε χριστος εγηγερται From the writer’s perspective, the consequences are patently false, hence aren’t the conditions called counter-factual?

No, I would say that neither Gal 3:19 nor 1 Cor 15:13, 16 is counter-factual. By definition counter-factual constructions are imaginary and hypothetical, as “If the inheritance were based on law, then it would not be based on promise.” In traditional English, counterfactual conditions require a verb in the subjunctive. Or so I was taught; it’s possible that linguistic change — i.e., popular usage — has erased that distinction in between counterfactual and simple conditional constructionss over the years. FWIW, I note that the Wikipedia article asserts this distinction: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counterfa … onditional Statistics: Posted by cwconrad — September 16th, 2012, 5:13 am

/////////////////////////////////////////// Word Meanings Re: Verb catalog – lexical aspect

Posted: 15 Sep 2012 11:03 PM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/lvNhg_9P2z4/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

It’s part of what makes scaling the hills of fluency so time consuming. But staying in the valleys should not be an option. Statistics: Posted by RandallButh — September 16th, 2012, 2:03 am

/////////////////////////////////////////// Other Words for nature, automatic, natural and existence?

Posted: 15 Sep 2012 07:44 PM PDT http://feedproxy.google.com/~r//~3/Xc3Fn0KxG8Y/viewtopic.php?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email

I would be grateful if anyone could tell me whether Biblical Greek had words for: 1) “nature” (as in the nature of trees); 2) “automatic” or “natural” (in the sense of something that happens of own accord, and invariably happens in certain circumstances); 3) “existence”.

At a guess, there have always been ways to express such concepts in any particular language, but my query is whether these concepts were embodied in single words (or short phrases signifying these meanings) in Biblical Greek that could reasonably be translated as the words above, or whether the meanings of the words above entered language as single words at a later date.

If there are Biblical Greek words or phrases that can reasonably be translated as the meanings above, are there other meanings that can also be indicated by the same Biblical Greek words or phrases? Statistics: Posted by Chris Eilers — September 15th, 2012, 10:44 pm

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