Luke 11:36

Nestle GNT 1904
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι ἐρωτᾷ αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖος ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

Westcott and Hort 1881
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι ἐρωτᾷ αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖος ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

Westcott and Hort / [NA27 variants]
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι ἐρωτᾷ αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖος ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

RP Byzantine Majority Text 2005
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι, ἠρώτα αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖός τις ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

Greek Orthodox Church 1904
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι αὐτὸν ταῦτα ἠρώτα αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖός τις ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

Tischendorf 8th Edition
Ἐν δὲ τῷ λαλῆσαι ἐρωτᾷ αὐτὸν Φαρισαῖος ὅπως ἀριστήσῃ παρ’ αὐτῷ· εἰσελθὼν δὲ ἀνέπεσεν.

Mark 8:36; 15:1, 16, 33; Luke 11:36 (1st part), though holon may here be used adverbially with photeinon, “wholly light” [as in the 2nd part, RV, “wholly (full of light)”]; John 11:50; 1 Cor. 12:17 (1st part); 1 John 2:2; 5:19; (b) absolutely, as a noun, e.g., Matt. 13:33; 1 Cor. 12:17 (2nd part). 2. pas (3956)

Westcott and Hort 1881
εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον φωτινόν, μὴ ἔχον μέρος τι σκοτινόν, ἔσται φωτινὸν ὅλον ὡς ὅταν ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ φωτίζῃ σε.

Westcott and Hort / [NA27 variants]
εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον φωτινόν / φωτεινόν, μὴ ἔχον μέρος τι σκοτινόν / σκοτεινόν, ἔσται φωτινὸν / φωτεινὸν ὅλον ὡς ὅταν ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ φωτίζῃ σε.

RP Byzantine Majority Text 2005
Εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον φωτεινόν, μὴ ἔχον τι μέρος σκοτεινόν, ἔσται φωτεινὸν ὅλον, ὡς ὅταν ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ φωτίζῃ σε.

Greek Orthodox Church 1904
εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον φωτεινόν, μὴ ἔχον τι μέρος σκοτεινόν, ἔσται φωτεινὸν ὅλον ὡς ὅταν ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ φωτίζῃ σε.

Tischendorf 8th Edition
εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον φωτεινόν, μὴ ἔχον τι μέρος σκοτεινόν, ἔσται φωτεινὸν ὅλον ὡς ὅταν ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ φωτίζῃ σε.

Mark 8:36; 15:1, 16, 33; Luke 11:36 (1st part), though holon may here be used adverbially with photeinon, “wholly light” [as in the 2nd part, RV, “wholly (full of light)”]; John 11:50; 1 Cor. 12:17 (1st part); 1 John 2:2; 5:19; (b) absolutely, as a noun, e.g., Matt. 13:33; 1 Cor. 12:17 (2nd part)

Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges

36. φωτίζῃ σε. The verse may be rendered literally, ‘If then thy body be wholly illumined … it shall be illumined wholly as when the lamp with its bright shining illumines thee.’ The spirit of man is the candle of the Lord. “God will light my candle,” Psalms 18:28. “Thy word is a lantern unto my feet.” In these words we catch an echo of those thoughts on the diffusiveness and divineness of light which are so fully developed in St John’s Gospel (Luke 8:12).

John Trapp Complete Commentary

36 If thy whole body therefore be full of light, having no part dark, the whole shall be full of light, as when the bright shining of a candle doth give thee light.

Ver. 36. Having no part dark] The regenerate man is totus diaphanus, like a crystal glass, with a lamp in the midst.

The Expositor’s Greek Testament

Luke 11:36. This verse is very puzzling both critically and exegetically. As it stands in T.R. (and in W.H(105)) it appears tautological (De Wette), a fault which some have tried to surmount by punctuation, and some by properly placed emphasis—on ὅλον in the protasis and on φωτεινόν in the apodosis, giving this sense: if thy body be wholly lighted, having no part dark, then will it be lighted indeed, as when the lamp with its lightning illumines thee (so Meyer). Even thus the saying seems unsatisfactory, and hardly such as Lk., not to say our Lord, could have been responsible for. The critical question thus forces itself upon us: is this really what Lk. wrote? Westcott and Hort think the passage contains “a primitive corruption,” an opinion which J. Weiss (in Meyer, p. 476, note) endorses, making at the same time an attempt to restore the true text. Such attempts are purely conjectural. The verse is omitted in (106), some Latin codd., and in Syr. Cur(107) The new Syr. Sin(108) has it in a form which Mrs. Lewis thus renders: “Therefore also thy body, when there is in it no lamp that hath shone, is dark, thus while thy lamp is shining, it gives light to thee”—a sentence as dark as a lampless body.

Wesley’s Explanatory Notes

If thy whole body be full of light – If thou art filled with holy wisdom, having no part dark, giving way to no sin or folly, then that heavenly principle will, like the clear flame of a lamp in a room that was dark before, shed its light into all thy powers and faculties.

Vincent’s Word Studies

The bright shining of a candle ( ὁ λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ )

More correctly, as Rev., the lamp with its bright shining. Ἀστραπή means lightning: see Luke 10:18; and that is the usual meaning in classical Greek, though it occurs, rarely, of the light of a lamp. It is used here to emphasize the idea of moral illumination.

Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary

36.] “Tautological: the second member contains the same assertion as the first.” (De Wette.)—Let us examine this. ‘When thine eye is single (Luke 11:34),—i.e. simple,—straight and single-seeing,—thy whole body will be light.’ Then (Luke 11:36),—‘if this be so,—if thy whole body be light, having no part dark,—then it shall all be light as when a lamp with its brightness illuminates thee.’ Of what is our Lord speaking? Of His teaching, as apprehended by the simple, single-seeing soul. If then the soul be so,—having no part darkened by prejudice or selfish lusts, and approach thus to His teaching, it shall be wholly illuminated by it, as by the candle of the Lord, searching its inward parts. So this saying, which, even as it stands, is not tautological,—for the second clause expresses the further result and waxing onward of the shining light, arising from the singleness of the eye,—becomes, in its spiritual significance, a weighty declaration of truth, answering to ch. Luke 8:15 :—see also John 8:12.

Heinrich Meyer’s Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

Luke 11:36. οὖν] taking up again the thought of Luke 11:34 : καὶ ὅλον τὸ σῶμά σου φωτεινόν ἐστιν.

In the protasis the emphasis lies on ὅλον, which therefore is more precisely explained by μὴ ἔχον τὶμέρ. σκοτ.; but in the apodosis φωτεινόν has the emphasis, and the kind and degree of this light are illustrated (comp. Luke 11:34) by ὡς ὅταν κ. τ. λ.: “If therefore thy body is absolutely and entirely bright, without having any part dark, then bright shall it be absolutely and entirely, as when the light with its beam enlightens thee.” For then is the eye rightly constituted, fulfilling its purpose (see on Matthew 6:22); but the eye stands to the body in the relation of the light, Luke 11:34. It is complete enlightenment, therefore, not merely partial, of which this normal condition of light ( ὡς ὅταν κ. τ. λ.) is affirmed. ἀπὸ τοῦ κατὰ τὸσῶμα παραδείγματος περὶ τῆς ψυχῆς δίδωσι νοεῖνἐὰν αὕτη ὅλη φωτεινὴ εἴη, μὴ ἔχουσαμηδὲν μέρος ἐσκοτισμένον πάθει, μήτε τὸ λογιστικὸν, μήτε τὸ θυμικὸν, μήτε τὸἐπιθυμικὸν, ἔσται φωτεινὴ ὅλη οὕτως, ὡς ὅταν λύχνος τῇ ἀστραπῇ αὐτοῦ φωτίζῃ σε, Euthymius Zigabenus. The observation of the above diversity of emphasis in the protasis and apodosis, which is clearly indicated by the varied position of ὅλον with respect to φωτεινόν, removes the appearance of tautology in the two members, renders needless the awkward change of the punctuationadvocated by Vogel (de conjecturae usu in crisi N. T. p. 37 f.) and Rinck: εἰ οὖν τὸ σῶμά σου ὅλον,φωτεινὸν μὴ ἔχον τι μέρος, σκοτεινὸν, ἔσται φωτεινὸν ὅλον κ. τ. λ., and sets aside theconjectures that have been broached, such as those of Michaelis (Einl. I. p. 739): ἔσται φωτ. τὸ ὅλον(body and soul), or ὁλοόν; of Bornemann: that the first ὅλον is a gloss; of Eichthal: that instead of “thybody” must be meant “thine eye” (comp. already Maldonatus).

λύχνος] the lamp of the room, Luke 11:33.

Johann Albrecht Bengel’s Gnomon of the New Testament

Luke 11:36. ὅλον φωτεινὸνφωτεινὸν ὅλον, all full of light—full of light all over or wholly) An instance of Ploce [when the same word is twice employed, so as that in one instance the notion of the word itself simply, in the other an attribute of it, is understood]. The perfection of the parts [ ὅλον in the first instance] tends to the perfection of degrees [ ὅλον in the second instance: light wholly and perfectly in degree]. [Often two words are put in inverted order, in two successive clauses, in such a way, as that in each clause the word that stands first is to have the emphasis. Matthew 24:33 (where see the note on the present passage), 34; John 8:21; John 8:24; John 14:1, et seqq.; 1 Corinthians 7:22; Galatians 4:25;Ephesians 2:1; Ephesians 2:5; Philippians 2:7-8; James 2:18; James 2:22. The analogy of examples shows that this is no vain subtlety of hyper-criticism.—Not. Crit.]— λύχνος [a candle] the lamp) that lamp [candle] of which in Luke 11:33 He had spoken.— τῇ ἀστραπῇ) with its utmost degree of bright shining(brilliancy).

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20 thoughts on “Luke 11:36

  1. Troy Day says:

    Here we go yall Walter Polasik Link Hudson starting you with the basic teaching of Jesus just like Wesley would have. Will bring it up a notch when you are ready. Note it is a command not a choice and it comes straight from Jesus. Other greek grammar is explained in detail in the post. Like I tell my students – if you have any questions make sure to ask before I fail you because then it will be too late (just like the rapture) BTW do gain basic knowledge on Wesleyan quadrilateral if you are really Pentecostal

  2. Link Hudson says:

    And so the question is, why does your belief system have an excuse for Christians not to live up to what Jesus taught here after they get saved, and before they have some kind of experience some time later?

  3. Troy Day: This passage is saying the same thing as Psalm 119:10-19. Jesus is talking about where we fix our hearts, our “spiritual eyesight” as it were. Either we are totally given over to Him or we are lacking. What we take in and our heart-attitude will guide where we go spiritually. This also speaks to bad doctrine. If the “light” that comes into our eyes isn’t really light at all, but darkness, “how great is that darkness!”. This happens when people take in cultic doctrine. Also when believers take in bad doctrine. Thank you for making my point for me, Troy. Next!

  4. BTW, It DOES have to do with holy living. As Jesus says in the verses preceding, “The lamp of the body is the eye.” Now, you tell me, Troy, what does that have to do with either us being sanctified by the blood of Jesus at salvation or at a later point through a zap? But it DOES have to do with how we live towards God in this world.

  5. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    Here we go yall Walter Polasik Link Hudson starting you with the basic teaching of Jesus just like Wesley would have. Will bring it up a notch when you are ready. Note it is a command not a choice and it comes straight from Jesus. Other greek grammar is explained in detail in the post. Like I tell my students – if you have any questions make sure to ask before I fail you because then it will be too late (just like the rapture) BTW do gain basic knowledge on Wesleyan quadrilateral if you are really Pentecostal

  6. Troy Day: This passage is saying the same thing as Psalm 119:10-19. Jesus is talking about where we fix our hearts, our “spiritual eyesight” as it were. Either we are totally given over to Him or we are lacking. What we take in and our heart-attitude will guide where we go spiritually. This also speaks to bad doctrine. If the “light” that comes into our eyes isn’t really light at all, but darkness, “how great is that darkness!”. This happens when people take in cultic doctrine. Also when believers take in bad doctrine. Thank you for making my point for me, Troy. Next!

  7. BTW, It DOES have to do with holy living. As Jesus says in the verses preceding, “The lamp of the body is the eye.” Now, you tell me, Troy, what does that have to do with either us being sanctified by the blood of Jesus at salvation or at a later point through a zap? But it DOES have to do with how we live towards God in this world.

  8. Troy Day says:

    1. Jesus commands entire holiness trough entire sanctification
    2. It is for ALL disciples i.e. all Christians should be entirely sanctified as Wesley taught
    3. It is for this time – not a future time
    4. Note the grammatical tense and case too
    5. It is entire – cant be partial
    6. No part can be left unsanctified
    7. No case for partial or progressive sanctification is meant.
    8. It is all entire and complete
    9. As a matter of fact, Jesus speaks plainly against partial holiness – there’s just no such thing in the Bible
    10. A partially holy church aint gonna be in the rapture (Have a nice tribulation!)

  9. Link Hudson says:

    Troy Day, well I apologize if I misunderstood your view to be that it is normative Christians to be unsanctied until they have an experience at an altar or some other place.

    But it sounds like you are beating up a strawman.

    And believing in a pre-trib rapture won’t save you from tribulation in this life.

  10. Troy Day says:

    Dont waste my time pls. If you have something to say about the Bible verse in question pls do – especially about the grammatical construction involved in the original language, do tell. Otherwise find another hobby

  11. “If thy whole body therefore be full of light, having no part dark, the whole shall be full of light, as when the bright shining of a candle doth give thee light.”
    – Luke 11:36

    I looked up several uses of light in the new testament. Jesus called John Baptist a light, a candle or a lamp. And says, “you rejoiced in his light” meaning the shining like the glory of angels. In Luke 11 the form of the Greek word is different, phōteinos. It means bright moral character and well lit. To me that can only mean to be full of passion for Jesus Christ and to love him. That will necessarily overflow with love and genuine concern for our fellow man.
    For me it is important to remember, John 8:12:
    “Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”
    So any true light or true love or goodness is only as we abide in Him.

  12. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    1. Jesus commands entire holiness trough entire sanctification
    2. It is for ALL disciples i.e. all Christians should be entirely sanctified as Wesley taught
    3. It is for this time – not a future time
    4. Note the grammatical tense and case too
    5. It is entire – cant be partial
    6. No part can be left unsanctified
    7. No case for partial or progressive sanctification is meant.
    8. It is all entire and complete
    9. As a matter of fact, Jesus speaks plainly against partial holiness – there’s just no such thing in the Bible
    10. A partially holy church aint gonna be in the rapture (Have a nice tribulation!)

  13. Link Hudson Link Hudson says:

    Troy Day, well I apologize if I misunderstood your view to be that it is normative Christians to be unsanctied until they have an experience at an altar or some other place.

    But it sounds like you are beating up a strawman.

    And believing in a pre-trib rapture won’t save you from tribulation in this life.

  14. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    Dont waste my time pls. If you have something to say about the Bible verse in question pls do – especially about the grammatical construction involved in the original language, do tell. Otherwise find another hobby

  15. “If thy whole body therefore be full of light, having no part dark, the whole shall be full of light, as when the bright shining of a candle doth give thee light.”
    – Luke 11:36

    I looked up several uses of light in the new testament. Jesus called John Baptist a light, a candle or a lamp. And says, “you rejoiced in his light” meaning the shining like the glory of angels. In Luke 11 the form of the Greek word is different, phōteinos. It means bright moral character and well lit. To me that can only mean to be full of passion for Jesus Christ and to love him. That will necessarily overflow with love and genuine concern for our fellow man.
    For me it is important to remember, John 8:12:
    “Then spake Jesus again unto them, saying, I am the light of the world: he that followeth me shall not walk in darkness, but shall have the light of life.”
    So any true light or true love or goodness is only as we abide in Him.

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