Luke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 B. D. Colt babc2 at attbi.com
Wed Apr 10 00:28:17 EDT 2002

 

EK PISTEWS EIS PISTIN (Ro 1.17) Lluke 24:15 I’m probably asking a dumb question again, but in next Sunday’s gospel I find:Luke 24:15KAI EGENETO EN TWi hOMILEIN *AUTOUS* KAI SUZHTEIN KAI AUTOS IHSOUS EGGISA SUNEPOREUETO AUTOIS.Can someone please clarify for me what the AUTOUS that I’ve marked is doing in this sentence? I’m just not getting it.Barbara D. Colt, mailto:babc2 at attbi.comSt John the Evangelist, San Francisco

 

EK PISTEWS EIS PISTIN (Ro 1.17)Lluke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 c stirling bartholomew cc.constantine at worldnet.att.net
Wed Apr 10 00:37:42 EDT 2002

 

Lluke 24:15 Lluke 24:15 on 4/9/02 9:28 PM, B. D. Colt wrote:> Luke 24:15> KAI EGENETO EN TWi hOMILEIN *AUTOUS* KAI> SUZHTEIN KAI AUTOS IHSOUS EGGISA> SUNEPOREUETO AUTOIS.> > Can someone please clarify for me what the AUTOUS that I’ve marked> is doing in this sentence? I’m just not getting it.Barbara,This is not a dumb question. I take AUTOUS as the subject of the infinitivehOMILEIN. I could be wrong.greetings,Clay– Clayton Stirling BartholomewThree Tree PointP.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062

 

Lluke 24:15Lluke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 Steven Lo Vullo slovullo at mac.com
Wed Apr 10 01:14:48 EDT 2002

 

Lluke 24:15 Lluke 24:15 on 4/9/02 11:28 PM, B. D. Colt at babc2 at attbi.com wrote:> I’m probably asking a dumb question again, but in next Sunday’s> gospel I find:> > Luke 24:15> KAI EGENETO EN TWi hOMILEIN *AUTOUS* KAI> SUZHTEIN KAI AUTOS IHSOUS EGGISA> SUNEPOREUETO AUTOIS.> > Can someone please clarify for me what the AUTOUS that I’ve marked> is doing in this sentence? I’m just not getting it.Barbara:An accusative substantive often functions semantically as the subject of aninfinitive when the the infinitive requires a different agent than that ofthe main verb. Older grammars would call this an “accusative of respect.”But from a descriptive and functional perspective, it seems best to treat itas the subject of the infinitive. You have to be careful, though, becausethe accusative substantive functioning as subject of the infinitive may**follow** the infinitive, as in your example above, and thus may beconfused as the direct object, which would also be in the accusative case.But usually context will make clear whether the accusative is the subject ordirect object (sometimes the infinitive will have both). As for the aboveexample: “And it came to pass that, while *they* were talking anddiscussing, Jesus himself approached and began traveling with them.” Themain verb is SUNEPOREUETO, whose subject is IHSOUS. Since the subject of theinfinitive in the prepositional phrase is different from that of the mainverb, it is indicated by AUTOUS.============Steven Lo VulloMadison, WIslovullo at mac.com

 

Lluke 24:15Lluke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Wed Apr 10 01:23:42 EDT 2002

 

Lluke 24:15 EK PISTEWS EIS PISTIN (Ro 1.17) In a message dated 4/10/2002 12:38:11 AM Eastern Daylight Time, cc.constantine at worldnet.att.net writes:This is not a dumb question. I take AUTOUS as the subject of the infinitivehOMILEIN. I could be wrong.___________________________No, you’re absolutely correct. Wallace, p. 193 has5. Accusative Subject of the Infinitivea. DefinitionThe accusative substantive frequently functions semantically as the subject of the infinitive. Though older grammars insist that technically this is an accusative of respect, from a descriptive and functional perspective, it is better to treat it as subject. This is a common use of the accusative, especially with personal pronouns.b. ClarificationNormally the subject of the infinitive is the same as the subject of the main verb and thus is in the nominative case. For example, in Luke 19:47 we read hOI GRAMMATEIS EZHTOUN AUTON APOLESAI (“the scribes were seeking to kill him”).59 But when the infinitive requires a different agent, it is almost always put in the accusative case.601) English AnalogiesThough this usage of the accusative is difficult to grasp, it is not without some parallels in English. In the sentence “She wanted me to learn something,” “me” is both the direct object of “wanted” and the subject of “to learn.” Greek usage is similar, though more varied (that is to say, the subject of an infinitive is not always going to do double-duty as a direct object, too). Note, for example, Phil 1:12–13: GINWSKEIN DE hUMAS BOULOMAI . . . hWSTE TOUS DESMOUS MOU FANEROUS . . . GENESQAI (“now I want you to know… so that my bonds have become manifest”). In v 12 the accusative is both object of the verbgeorge

 

Lluke 24:15EK PISTEWS EIS PISTIN (Ro 1.17)

Lluke 24:15 One of the McKays musicke at ozemail.com.au
Wed Apr 10 22:41:06 EDT 2002

 

Lk 24.17, PAROIKEW 1 Cor. 2:7 Is this the Welsh version?David McKaymusicke at ozemail.com.auhttp://members.ozemail.com.au/~musicke

 

Lk 24.17, PAROIKEW1 Cor. 2:7

Lluke 24:15 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Wed Apr 10 23:27:52 EDT 2002

 

Lk 24.17, PAROIKEW 1 Cor. 2:7 In a message dated 4/10/2002 10:40:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, musicke at ozemail.com.au writes:Is this the Welsh version?____________It would appear that way! :-)gfsomsel

 

Lk 24.17, PAROIKEW1 Cor. 2:7

Lluke 24:15 B. D. Colt babc2 at attbi.com
Thu Apr 11 06:37:44 EDT 2002

 

1 Cor. 2:7 Rev 5:12-13 On 11 Apr 02, at 12:41, David McKay wrote:> Is this the Welsh version?I don’t know whether my keyboard is extra sensitive or my fingers are a bit heavy on the keys, but characters are constantly getting doubled lately. I caught and corrected another one, but that one I missed.Barbara D. Colt, mailto:babc2 at attbi.comSt John the Evangelist, San Francisco

 

1 Cor. 2:7Rev 5:12-13

Lluke 24:15 One of the McKays musicke at ozemail.com.au
Thu Apr 11 10:01:04 EDT 2002

 

Rev 5:12-13 Lluke 24:15 Barbara, You should see what my typing looks like befroe I correct it!I wonder if I should type in a program like Word, and use its correctionfacilities.But, with Welsh blood on my wife’s side, and a house called Lllewellyn[whoops] I couldn’t resistDavid McKaymusicke at ozemail.com.auhttp://members.ozemail.com.au/~musicke

 

Rev 5:12-13Lluke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 Maurice A. O’Sullivan mauros at iol.ie
Thu Apr 11 10:57:44 EDT 2002

 

Lluke 24:15 masc/feminine plural participle At 15:01 11/04/02, One of the McKays wrote:>I wonder if I should type in a program like Word, and use its correction>facilities.Why not switch to Eudora as your mailer — it has an excellent spell checker?You might like to have a look at its features: http://www.eudora.com/email/features/And bearing in mind your .au domain, the choice of U.S or U.K dictionaries might be an enticement <g>Best of all, it shunts attachments into a sub-folder ( with any name you choose ) which very largely defeats all those viruses that depend on the weaknesses inherent in Outlook Express.RegardsMauriceMaurice A. O’Sullivan [ Bray, Ireland ]mauros at iol.ie

 

Lluke 24:15masc/feminine plural participle

Lluke 24:15 Paul Dixon dixonps at juno.com
Thu Apr 11 11:15:15 EDT 2002

 

masc/feminine plural participle 1 Cor. 2:7 On Thu, 11 Apr 2002 15:57:44 +0100 “Maurice A. O’Sullivan”<mauros at iol.ie> writes:> At 15:01 11/04/02, One of the McKays wrote:> > >I wonder if I should type in a program like Word, and use its > correction> >facilities.> > > Why not switch to Eudora as your mailer — it has an excellent spell > checker?> You might like to have a look at its features: > http://www.eudora.com/email/features/David:Eudora is fine, but the suggested retail cost is $39.99 (USA). I useJuno. It has a spell checker and some nice features. Best of all, it isfree. Download it at: www.juno.com.Hey, don’t they teach you how to spell down there in Australia? ;)Paul Dixon

 

masc/feminine plural participle1 Cor. 2:7

Lluke 24:15 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Thu Apr 11 12:45:29 EDT 2002

 

1 Cor. 2:7 Luke 24:15 In a message dated 4/11/2002 11:17:46 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dixonps at juno.com writes:Hey, don’t they teach you how to spell down there in Australia? ;)_______________You need to remember that the are at a disadvantage. They need to transpose everything since they’re upside down! :-)gfsomsel

 

1 Cor. 2:7Luke 24:15

Lluke 24:15 Maurice A. O’Sullivan mauros at iol.ie
Thu Apr 11 14:37:59 EDT 2002

 

e-Greek & information discounts e-Greek & information discounts At 16:15 11/04/02, Paul Dixon wrote:>Eudora is fine, but the suggested retail cost is $39.99 (USA).Actually, it exists in three forms: a “lite” form, free; full but sponsored ( i.e advertising panel ) free; full, at the price you give.Regards,Maurice A. O’Sullivan [ Bray, Ireland ]mauros at iol.ie

 

e-Greek & information discountse-Greek & information discounts
Luke 24:15 B. D. Colt babc2 at attbi.com
Thu Apr 11 12:59:39 EDT 2002

 

Lluke 24:15 e-Greek & information discounts Much thanks to everyone who answered my plea for help on this.Barbara D. Colt, mailto:babc2 at attbi.comSt John the Evangelist, San Francisco

 

Lluke 24:15e-Greek & information discounts

[] Luke 24:15 KAI EGENETO EN TWi hOMILEIN AUTOUS KAI SUZHTEIN Jonathan Robie jwrobie at mindspring.com
Sat Apr 9 16:31:17 EDT 2005

 

[] How do modern Greeks pronounce Biblical Greek [] Thyatira Luke 24:15 KAI EGENETO [[** EN TWi hOMILEIN AUTOUS KAI SUZHTEIN **]] KAI AUTOS IHSOUS EGGISAS SUNEPOREUETO AUTOIS, 16 hOI DE OFQALMOI AUTWN EKRATOUNTO TOU MH EPIGNWNAI AUTON.I’m trying to grasp the exact meaning of SUZHTEIN in the above text. Some translations suggest it means debating, BDAG has (1) “to carry on a discussion, discuss”, which it flags as the meaning for this verse, or (2) to contend with persistence for a point of view, dispute, debate, argue, or (3) to ponder various aspects of a matter, reflect, meditate.All three senses seem reasonable for this verse, and translations seem to vary in which of these senses they follow. How much can we actually know about the nature and tone of the conversation from this phrase?JonathanLittle Greek and List Owner

 

[] How do modern Greeks pronounce Biblical Greek[] Thyatira

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