Mark 16:15

[] Mark 16… James J. jamesjay at paonline.com
Fri Dec 24 18:48:22 EST 2004

 

[] unicode for typing Greek [] Mark 16… Hello list. Just joined. I have a question on some grammar in Mark16:15. The verbs “Go” and “preach” are both in Aorist tense. Shouldn’t we expecta present imperitive here?Also could someone recommend some good commentary that deals with the Greek ofthe NT; something like the Keil & Delitch of the OT.Thanks;James J.

 

[] unicode for typing Greek[] Mark 16…

[] Mark 16… Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Fri Dec 24 19:28:07 EST 2004

 

[] Re; Rom 16:7 Halt this string [] Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6 At 6:48 PM -0500 12/24/04, James J. wrote:>Hello list. Just joined. I have a question on some grammar in Mark>16:15. The verbs “Go” and “preach” are both in Aorist tense. Shouldn’t we expect>a present imperitive here?It would help to cite the text: POREUQENTES EIS TON KOSMON hAPANTA KHRUXATE TOEUAGGELION PASHi THI KTISEI(1) It’s common for a participle indicating the earlier of successive actions tobe aorist; (2) the force of the aorist KHRUXATE should probably understood asperfective rather that durative/continuative: it’s not “keep proclaiming”(although one may need to do that to achieve what’s demanded) but “get itproclaimed.” So the text viewed most literally is: “When you’ve gone into theentire world get the gospel proclaimed to the whole creation.”Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

 

[] Re; Rom 16:7 Halt this string[] Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6

[] Mark 16… Eddie Mishoe edmishoe at yahoo.com
Fri Dec 24 19:38:59 EST 2004

 

[] Mark 16… FW: [] unicode for typing Greek James:I would not expect either the Present or Aorist in anygiven context. The writer may want to present an eventfrom the Aorist perspective, and may later present thesame event from the Present perspective.The Aorist Imperatives here denote the idea of “getthe action or event completed.” The present imperativewould denote “get the action started.” (I might also point out that had the PresentImperative been used here, the writer would not besaying he ONLY wanted the event to get started.Rather, he would have been focusing the readers’attention in that direction for some pragmaticreason.)Either way, after all is said and done, the writerwants them to get started (Present) and finished(Aorist).Eddie Mishoe— “James J.” <jamesjay at paonline.com> wrote:> Hello list. Just joined. I have a question> on some grammar in Mark> 16:15. The verbs “Go” and “preach” are both in> Aorist tense. Shouldn’t we expect> a present imperitive here?> > Also could someone recommend some good commentary> that deals with the Greek of> the NT; something like the Keil & Delitch of the OT.> > > Thanks;> James J.> > > >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Jazz up your holiday email with celebrity designs. Learn more. http://celebrity.mail.yahoo.com

 

[] Mark 16…FW: [] unicode for typing Greek

[] Mark 16… Eric Weiss papaweiss1 at yahoo.com
Sat Dec 25 22:54:11 EST 2004

 

[] RE: Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6 [] Mark 16… I think Daniel Wallace (Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics) would likely call this an instance of an Attendant Circumstance participle, to be translated as a finite verb connected to the main verb by “and.” His criteria/indicators are that it does not first make good sense when treated as an adverbial participle (including temporal, I assume, i.e., “while” for present; “after” for aorist), and then he says that 90% of Attendant Circumstance participles have the following five features: * tense of the participle is usually aorist* tense of the main verb is usually aorist (the historical present occurs from time to time)* mood of the main verb is usually imperative or indicative (the subjunctive sometimes occurs)* participle precedes the main verb in word order and time of event (though usually in close proximity)* occurs frequently in narrative literature, infrequently elsewhere Wallace says the POREUQENTES OUN MAQHTEUSATE PANTA TO EQNH of Matthew 28:19 is an Attendant Circumstance participle: “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all the nations….” The NET Bible, which Wallace helped edit, translates Mark 16:15 as “Go into all the world and preach the gospel to every creature.” Other translations that treat it similarly include KJV, NASB, NIV, Amplified, Rheims, NAB, NRSV. That is, they do not emphasise the antecedent nature of the aorist participle but coordinate its action with the main verb (“Go and preach”). To the English reader, it appears that two finite verbs are being translated. As for why an aorist (rather than a present) imperative is used, it could be because an Attendant Circumstance participle usually requires an aorist imperative in conjunction with an aorist participle.Without Bible software I can’t easily do a search for attendant circumstance participles where the main verb is a present imperative, if such exist.Eric S. Weiss———————————Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail – 250MB free storage. Do more. Manage less.

 

[] RE: Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6[] Mark 16…

[] Mark 16… Steven Lo Vullo themelios at charter.net
Sun Dec 26 13:16:28 EST 2004

 

[] Mark 16… [] RE: Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6 On Dec 25, 2004, at 9:54 PM, Eric Weiss wrote:> I think Daniel Wallace (Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics)> would likely call this an instance of an Attendant Circumstance> participle, to be translated as a finite verb connected to the main> verb by “and.” His criteria/indicators are that it does not first make> good sense when treated as an adverbial participle (including> temporal, I assume, i.e., “while” for present; “after” for aorist),> and then he says that 90% of Attendant Circumstance> participles have the following five features:> > * tense of the participle is usually aorist> * tense of the main verb is usually aorist (the historical present> occurs from time to time)> * mood of the main verb is usually imperative or indicative (the> subjunctive sometimes occurs)> * participle precedes the main verb in word order and time of> event (though usually in close proximity)> * occurs frequently in narrative literature, infrequently elsewhere> > Wallace says the POREUQENTES OUN MAQHTEUSATE> PANTA TO EQNH of Matthew 28:19 is an Attendant> Circumstance participle: “Go, therefore, and make disciples> of all the nations….” The NET Bible, which Wallace helped> edit, translates Mark 16:15 as “Go into all the world and> preach the gospel to every creature.” Other translations> that treat it similarly include KJV, NASB, NIV, Amplified,> Rheims, NAB, NRSV. That is, they do not emphasise the> antecedent nature of the aorist participle but coordinate its> action with the main verb (“Go and preach”). To the English> reader, it appears that two finite verbs are being translated.Wallace describes this construction by saying that the participle “piggy-backs” on the mood of the finite verb, which is kind of a neat way to describe it, I think.============Steven Lo VulloMadison, WI

 

[] Mark 16…[] RE: Advanced Grammatical Search using BibleWorks 6

People who read this article also liked:

[AuthorRecommendedPosts]

3 thoughts on “Mark 16:15

  1. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    Come on now Howard Gardner Isaac Coverstone dont leave me hanging here Yall started well on Marks text (form) criticism Lets finish it up I am yet to see anything in Marks Greek that shows copying editing redaction or abstract from an earlier Matthew.

    This here is another good example in v 15 I have a question on some grammar in Mark 16:15. The verbs “Go” and “preach” are both in Aorist tense. Shouldn’t we expect a present imperative here?

    Daniel Wallace (Greek Grammar Beyond the Basics) would likely call this an instance of an Attendant Circumstance participle, to be translated as a finite verb connected to the main verb by “and.” His criteria/indicators are that it does not first make good sense when treated as an adverbial participle

    1. Textual criticism begins with an assumption (Mark is the shorter of the Gospels therefore it came first) and then, rather than examine all possibilities, moves forward with the presumption that their hypothesis is true. This is not a scientific method.

      I have seen then do the same thing with the late dating of Daniel (which I think Gleason Archer did a good job of debunking), 6th.ISAIAH!!! (can you believe they actually thought the text at Dead Sea would not go beyond chapter 40!!! Where is their admission of failure?), the supposedly Gnostic Paul or the claim that Jesus never existed. At least Bart Ehrmann was honest enough to debunk this. He did a better job of thus than most Christian commentators (with the possible exception of Habermas).

      That is all I see you doing. Beginning with a presumption and then looking for any possible way to defend it without even considering the possibility that it could be wrong. They are numerous passages that both Matthew and Luke have in common.which do not show up in Mark. Yet they both copied from Mark? I still think a fourth common source or sources is more likely.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.