Matthew 12:6

IOKOBOS to JAMES Cal Redmond kuyacal at netscape.net
Sat Aug 3 07:58:36 EDT 2002

Matthew 12:6 Matthew 12:6 Dear friends,I was reading through Mark in Greek recently with some students, and the question arose as to how the name IAKOBOS came into English as James rather than Jacob. Does anyone have a good answer? I didn’t.Thanks,Cal RedmondProf. of New TestamentThe International School of Theology-AsiaManila, The Philippines

Matthew 12:6Matthew 12:6

IOKOBOS to JAMES Clwinbery at aol.com Clwinbery at aol.com
Sat Aug 3 09:49:47 EDT 2002

Matthew 12:6 IOKOBOS to JAMES In the GNT the name is most often IAKWBOS, a transliteration of Jacob. In Latin the name is either IACOBUS or IACOMUS. The latter is brought into English as the name James, the consonantal I as a J and the CO drops. If you can find a copy of Murray, New English Dictionary, it will give a much more detailed account of the origin of the name James in English.Carlton WinberyLouisiana College

Matthew 12:6IOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Cal Redmond kuyacal at netscape.net
Sat Aug 3 10:53:32 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES Relative difficulty of GNT books Thank you! I knew someone would know the answer.Cal RedmondClwinbery at aol.com wrote:>In the GNT the name is most often IAKWBOS, a transliteration of Jacob. In Latin the name is either IACOBUS or IACOMUS. The latter is brought into English as the name James, the consonantal I as a J and the CO drops. If you can find a copy of Murray, New English Dictionary, it will give a much more detailed account of the origin of the name James in English.> >Carlton Winbery>Louisiana College> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>You are currently subscribed to as: [kuyacal at netscape.net]>To unsubscribe, forward this message to $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)>To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> >

IOKOBOS to JAMESRelative difficulty of GNT books

IOKOBOS to JAMES Kevin Barney klbarney at yahoo.com
Sun Aug 4 00:22:53 EDT 2002

Relative difficulty of GNT books Relative difficulty of GNT books The Latin transliteration of the Greek, Iacobus,became Iacomus in late Latin. In the romancelanguages the name transmogrified to Giacomo inItalian, Jaime in Spanish, and I believe Iames inFrench. English James is like the French form, butwith an anglicized J.Kevin BarneyHoffman Estates, ILklbarney at yahoo.com> ———————————————————————-> > Subject: Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> From: Clwinbery at aol.com> Date: Sat, 03 Aug 2002 09:49:47 -0400> X-Message-Number: 3> > In the GNT the name is most often IAKWBOS, a> transliteration of Jacob. In Latin the name is> either IACOBUS or IACOMUS. The latter is brought> into English as the name James, the consonantal I as> a J and the CO drops. If you can find a copy of> Murray, New English Dictionary, it will give a much> more detailed account of the origin of the name> James in English.> > Carlton Winbery> Louisiana College> > =====Kevin L. BarneyHoffman Estates, Illinoisklbarney at yahoo.com__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Yahoo! Health – Feel better, live betterhttp://health.yahoo.com

Relative difficulty of GNT booksRelative difficulty of GNT books

IOKOBOS to JAMES Chuck Tripp ctripp at ptialaska.net
Sun Aug 4 01:28:05 EDT 2002

Relative difficulty of GNT books Meaning of EMBRIMAOMAI I believe in French it is Jacques.Chuck TrippKodiak, Alaska—– Original Message —–From: Kevin Barney <klbarney at yahoo.com>To: Biblical Greek < at franklin.metalab.unc.edu>Sent: Saturday, August 03, 2002 8:22 PMSubject: [] Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> The Latin transliteration of the Greek, Iacobus,> became Iacomus in late Latin. In the romance> languages the name transmogrified to Giacomo in> Italian, Jaime in Spanish, and I believe Iames in> French. English James is like the French form, but> with an anglicized J.> > Kevin Barney> Hoffman Estates, IL> klbarney at yahoo.com> > > >> ———————————————————————-> >> > Subject: Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> > From: Clwinbery at aol.com> > Date: Sat, 03 Aug 2002 09:49:47 -0400> > X-Message-Number: 3> >> > In the GNT the name is most often IAKWBOS, a> > transliteration of Jacob. In Latin the name is> > either IACOBUS or IACOMUS. The latter is brought> > into English as the name James, the consonantal I as> > a J and the CO drops. If you can find a copy of> > Murray, New English Dictionary, it will give a much> > more detailed account of the origin of the name> > James in English.> >> > Carlton Winbery> > Louisiana College> >> >> > =====> Kevin L. Barney> Hoffman Estates, Illinois> klbarney at yahoo.com> > __________________________________________________> Do You Yahoo!?> Yahoo! Health – Feel better, live better> http://health.yahoo.com> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: [ctripp at ptialaska.net]> To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> >

Relative difficulty of GNT booksMeaning of EMBRIMAOMAI

IOKOBOS to JAMES Chuck Tripp ctripp at ptialaska.net
Mon Aug 5 11:43:21 EDT 2002

EXANASTASIS Attached files & HTML/MIME formatting I have a French Bible on my lap, Epitre de Jacques is after Epitre auxHebreux and before Premiere Epitre de Pierre. Premiere, deuxieme andtroisieme epitre de Jean follows deuxiem epitre de Pierre. After l’evangileselon Luc is l’evangile selon Jean.James is Jacques in French, John is Jean.Chuck TrippKodiak, Alaska—– Original Message —–From: Steve Puluka <spuluka at hotmail.com>To: Chuck Tripp <ctripp at ptialaska.net>Sent: Sunday, August 04, 2002 4:19 AMSubject: Re: [] Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> Chuck,> > Jacques is Jack/John.> > Steve Puluka> http://www.geocities.com/spuluka> > —– Original Message —–> From: Chuck Tripp <ctripp at ptialaska.net>> To: Biblical Greek < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>> Sent: Sunday, August 04, 2002 1:28 AM> Subject: [] Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> > > > I believe in French it is Jacques.> >> > Chuck Tripp> > Kodiak, Alaska> > —– Original Message —–> > From: Kevin Barney <klbarney at yahoo.com>> > To: Biblical Greek < at franklin.metalab.unc.edu>> > Sent: Saturday, August 03, 2002 8:22 PM> > Subject: [] Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> >> >> > > The Latin transliteration of the Greek, Iacobus,> > > became Iacomus in late Latin. In the romance> > > languages the name transmogrified to Giacomo in> > > Italian, Jaime in Spanish, and I believe Iames in> > > French. English James is like the French form, but> > > with an anglicized J.> > >> > > Kevin Barney> > > Hoffman Estates, IL> > > klbarney at yahoo.com> > >> > >> > > >> > > ———————————————————————-> > > >> > > > Subject: Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> > > > From: Clwinbery at aol.com> > > > Date: Sat, 03 Aug 2002 09:49:47 -0400> > > > X-Message-Number: 3> > > >> > > > In the GNT the name is most often IAKWBOS, a> > > > transliteration of Jacob. In Latin the name is> > > > either IACOBUS or IACOMUS. The latter is brought> > > > into English as the name James, the consonantal I as> > > > a J and the CO drops. If you can find a copy of> > > > Murray, New English Dictionary, it will give a much> > > > more detailed account of the origin of the name> > > > James in English.> > > >> > > > Carlton Winbery> > > > Louisiana College> > > >> > > >> > >> > > =====> > > Kevin L. Barney> > > Hoffman Estates, Illinois> > > klbarney at yahoo.com> > >> > > __________________________________________________> > > Do You Yahoo!?> > > Yahoo! Health – Feel better, live better> > > http://health.yahoo.com> > >> > > —> > > home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> > > You are currently subscribed to as: [ctripp at ptialaska.net]> > > To unsubscribe, forward this message to> > $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> > > To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > >> > >> >> >> > —> > home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> > You are currently subscribed to as: [spuluka at hotmail.com]> > To unsubscribe, forward this message to> $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> > To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> >> >> >>

EXANASTASISAttached files & HTML/MIME formatting

IOKOBOS to JAMES Chuck Tripp ctripp at ptialaska.net
Mon Aug 5 16:27:59 EDT 2002

2 Cor 3:14 – MH ANAKALUPTOMENON 2 Cor. 3:14 I went and looked up James in a spanish bible and as it turns out, it isSantiago. I believe the -iago part of the word is what comes from the greekIOKOBOS. Of the three, James, Jacques and -iago, from IOCABOS, James seemsto me to be the biggest stretch.Chuck TrippKodiak, Alaska

2 Cor 3:14 – MH ANAKALUPTOMENON2 Cor. 3:14

IOKOBOS to JAMES tmcos at canada.com tmcos at canada.com
Mon Aug 5 17:21:49 EDT 2002

Hellenistic Greek Linguistics page IOKOBOS to JAMES Chuck, “Santiago” is actually “St.James” in Spanish.Tiago is the Spanish (and Portuguese as well)word forJames. Best, Tony Costa Universtity of Toronto”Chuck Tripp” wrote:> > I went and looked up James in a spanish bible and asit> turns out, it is> Santiago. I believe the -iago part of the word iswhat> comes from the greek> IOKOBOS. Of the three, James, Jacques and -iago, from> IOCABOS, James seems> to me to be the biggest stretch.> > Chuck Tripp> Kodiak, Alaska> > >> home page: <ahref=”http://mail.canada.com//jump/http://metalab.unc.edu/”>http://metalab.unc.edu/</a>> You are currently subscribed to as:> [tmcos at canada.com]> To unsubscribe, forward this message to> $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to> subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu__________________________________________________________Get your FREE personalized e-mail at http://www.canada.com

Hellenistic Greek Linguistics pageIOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Wayne Leman wayne_leman at sil.org
Mon Aug 5 18:01:37 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES Romans 1:17 “Tiago” is not Spanish or Portuguese for “James.” It cannot be separatedfrom the complete word “Santiago.” (Even though neither “tiago” nor “iago”are Spanish or Portuguese words by themselves, etymologically, “iago”derives from the Latin and Greek for “Jacob”.) “San” by itself, of course,means “saint,” but the remainder of the word “Santiago” (Tiago) does notmean “James.” Spanish “Jacobo” and “Jaime” also mean “James.” Obviously,these are cognates with English “Jacob,” and “James,” respectively. Thedisciple James in Spanish Bibles is sometimes referred to as Santiago andsometimes as Jacobo. My father-in-law, James, was a missionary in Mexico forthirty years and was known there as Don Jaime, where “don” is the term ofrespect toward an adult male.Wayne—–Wayne LemanBible Translation discussion list:http://biblepacesetter.org/bibletranslation/index.html> Chuck, “Santiago” is actually “St.James” in Spanish.> Tiago is the Spanish (and Portuguese as well)word for> James. Best,> > Tony Costa> Universtity of Toronto

IOKOBOS to JAMESRomans 1:17

IOKOBOS to JAMES hefin jones hefinjones at hotmail.com
Tue Aug 6 06:11:01 EDT 2002

Rom. 1:17 IOKOBOS to JAMES Is this B-greek or B-translation?However, bizarrely enough James IS “Iago” in my other native tongue, Welsh.Hefin JonesBD III, Moore College, Sydney>From: “Wayne Leman” <wayne_leman at sil.org>>Reply-To: “Wayne Leman” <wayne_leman at sil.org>>To: Biblical Greek < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>>Subject: [] IOKOBOS to JAMES>Date: Mon, 5 Aug 2002 16:01:37 -0600> >“Tiago” is not Spanish or Portuguese for “James.” It cannot be separated>from the complete word “Santiago.” (Even though neither “tiago” nor “iago”>are Spanish or Portuguese words by themselves, etymologically, “iago”>derives from the Latin and Greek for “Jacob”.) “San” by itself, of course,>means “saint,” but the remainder of the word “Santiago” (Tiago) does not>mean “James.” Spanish “Jacobo” and “Jaime” also mean “James.” Obviously,>these are cognates with English “Jacob,” and “James,” respectively. The>disciple James in Spanish Bibles is sometimes referred to as Santiago and>sometimes as Jacobo. My father-in-law, James, was a missionary in Mexico >for>thirty years and was known there as Don Jaime, where “don” is the term of>respect toward an adult male.> >Wayne>—–>Wayne Leman>Bible Translation discussion list:>http://biblepacesetter.org/bibletranslation/index.html> > > Chuck, “Santiago” is actually “St.James” in Spanish.> > Tiago is the Spanish (and Portuguese as well)word for> > James. Best,> >> > Tony Costa> > Universtity of Toronto> > > >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>You are currently subscribed to as: [hefinjones at hotmail.com]>To unsubscribe, forward this message to >$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)>To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu_________________________________________________________________MSN Photos is the easiest way to share and print your photos: http://photos.msn.com/support/worldwide.aspx

Rom. 1:17IOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Wayne Leman wayne_leman at sil.org
Tue Aug 6 09:13:20 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES IOKOBOS to JAMES > Is this B-greek or B-translation?B-greek. Some of us were just trying to wrap up the loose ends of a questionthat originated in the Greek text and translation to English. And now I needto eat crow and publicly confess: I was wrong about Portuguese. Tiago is,indeed, a name for “James” in Portuguese.> > However, bizarrely enough James IS “Iago” in my other native tongue,Welsh.Interesting,Wayne—–Wayne LemanBible Translation discussion list:http://biblepacesetter.org/bibletranslation/index.html> > Hefin Jones> > BD III, Moore College, Sydney

IOKOBOS to JAMESIOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Cal Redmond kuyacal at netscape.net
Tue Aug 6 09:55:01 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES Greek grammar in German anyone? Yes, here in the Philippines James is also called Santiago due to 400 years of Spanish rule. And I agree that James is a difficult stretch, which prompted my question. I didn’t know so many people would find it interesting.Cal RedmondProfessor of New TestamentThe International School of Theology-AsiaManila, The Philippinesctripp at ptialaska.net wrote:>I went and looked up James in a spanish bible and as it turns out, it is>Santiago. I believe the -iago part of the word is what comes from the greek>IOKOBOS. Of the three, James, Jacques and -iago, from IOCABOS, James seems>to me to be the biggest stretch.> >Chuck Tripp>Kodiak, Alaska> > >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>You are currently subscribed to as: [kuyacal at netscape.net]>To unsubscribe, forward this message to $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)>To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> >

IOKOBOS to JAMESGreek grammar in German anyone?

IOKOBOS to JAMES Eric S. Weiss eweiss at gte.net
Tue Aug 6 22:24:00 EDT 2002

Titus 1:6 IOKOBOS to JAMES IACWBOS = JAMES is a weird convolution/evolution, but what personally getsme is the refusal (in English at least) to name the short book before theApocalypse JUDAS. The author’s name is IOUDAS, not IOUDH/E. I know thatmore than one set of eyebrows will be raised in my “Greek for non-Greeks”class when they see for themselves that Jude is actually Judas.

Titus 1:6IOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Tue Aug 6 23:42:25 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES Romans 1:17 At 10:24 PM -0400 8/6/02, Eric S. Weiss wrote:>IACWBOS = JAMES is a weird convolution/evolution, but what personally gets>me is the refusal (in English at least) to name the short book before the>Apocalypse JUDAS. The author’s name is IOUDAS, not IOUDH/E. I know that>more than one set of eyebrows will be raised in my “Greek for non-Greeks”>class when they see for themselves that Jude is actually Judas.Well, it does indeed appear that this is one of the longest threads everover a rather marginal issue and I certainly didn’t think I’d be having anyinput into it, but now I can’t resist. “Yehudah” once Hellenized to IOUDASand later Anglicized to “Judah” has indeed suffered its own fate oflinguistic transformation. My guess is that the form “Jude” is theGallicized IOUDAS and that the Biblical book took its name from theGallicized form–but there’s no reason in the world why it couldn’t havebeen “Judah”–certainly that name is common enough among English-speakersas a proper name.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)Most months:: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.comWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

IOKOBOS to JAMESRomans 1:17

IOKOBOS to JAMES Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at attbi.com
Wed Aug 7 09:16:54 EDT 2002

Romans 1:17 IOKOBOS to JAMES “Carl W. Conrad” wrote:> At 10:24 PM -0400 8/6/02, Eric S. Weiss wrote:> >IACWBOS = JAMES is a weird convolution/evolution, but what personally gets> >me is the refusal (in English at least) to name the short book before the> >Apocalypse JUDAS. The author’s name is IOUDAS, not IOUDH/E. I know that> >more than one set of eyebrows will be raised in my “Greek for non-Greeks”> >class when they see for themselves that Jude is actually Judas.> > Well, it does indeed appear that this is one of the longest threads ever> over a rather marginal issue and I certainly didn’t think I’d be having any> input into it, but now I can’t resist. “Yehudah” once Hellenized to IOUDAS> and later Anglicized to “Judah” has indeed suffered its own fate of> linguistic transformation. My guess is that the form “Jude” is the> Gallicized IOUDAS and that the Biblical book took its name from the> Gallicized form–but there’s no reason in the world why it couldn’t have> been “Judah”–certainly that name is common enough among English-speakers> as a proper name.Should we not take into consideration that what we here is an indication of howshameful the name Judas had become, given that this was the name born by “thetraitor”? We have a similar phenomenon — the origin of which is known only now tothose who are interested in historical trivia — in the expression “your name will beMudd”.Yours,Jeffrey Gibson–Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon.)1500 W. Pratt Blvd. Floor 1Chicago, Illinois 60626e-mail jgibson000 at attbi.com jgibson000 at hotmail.com

Romans 1:17IOKOBOS to JAMES

IOKOBOS to JAMES Eric S. Weiss eweiss at gte.net
Wed Aug 7 10:19:27 EDT 2002

IOKOBOS to JAMES Sentences in Greek > Should we not take into consideration that what we here is an indication of how> shameful the name Judas had become, given that this was the name born by “the> traitor”? We have a similar phenomenon — the origin of which is known only now to> those who are interested in historical trivia — in the expression “your name will be> Mudd”.> > Yours,> > Jeffrey GibsonI didn’t mention or suggest it in my original post, because I thought thisreason for the book being called “Jude” instead of “Judas” would likelysuggest itself to everyone. I for one do not doubt that one reason, if notTHE reason, the book is called “Jude” is for precisely the reason Jeffreyhas stated. But … it would be nice to know if there are other legitimatereasons for the name change/diminution/corruption. Though, as Carl hassaid, this is maybe far afield of now of (Welch?!?!) >> Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon.)> 1500 W. Pratt Blvd.> Floor 1> Chicago, Illinois 60626> e-mail jgibson000 at attbi.com> jgibson000 at hotmail.com

IOKOBOS to JAMESSentences in Greek

IOKOBOS to JAMES James Ernest jdelists at earthlink.net
Thu Aug 8 15:57:30 EDT 2002

Sentences in Greek Sentences in Greek How the NRSV almost had a Letter of Judas–This is from Bruce Metzger, *Reminiscences of an Octogenarian* (Peabody,Mass.: Hendrickson, 1997), 91-92:”Occasionally a change was adopted that at a later session appeared to beill-advised. Such was the proposal that I made inthe interest of uniformity, namely that the Greek name *Ioudas* should berendered throughout the New Testament by “Judas,”including its occurrence in the title and in the first verse of the Letterof Jude. That night, however, I began to consider how perplexed readerswould be to find in their New Testament a letter of Judas! The nextmorning, therefore, I reopened the discussion and was able to persuade amajority of the Committee that the wisest course was to retain thetraditional rendering for the Letter of Jude and to use a footnoteindicating that the Greek reads *Judas*.”This chapter on the NRSV includes an account of deliberations as to whetherthe best English for Hebrew *miknas* would be “drawers,” “shorts,” or”skivvies” and whether perhaps 1 Macc 6:46 should be rendered “he snuckunder the elephant” but nothing about “James.”Jacobus Minimus________________________________________________________James D. Ernest, Ph.D.Associate Editorial DirectorHendrickson Publishers140 Summit StreetP. O. Box 3473Peabody, MA 01961-3473 USA978/573-2243 (phone and voicemail)978/573-8243 (fax)jernest at hendrickson.comhttp://www.hendrickson.com/________________________________________________________—– Original Message —–From: “Eric S. Weiss” <eweiss at gte.net>To: “Biblical Greek” < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>Sent: Wednesday, August 07, 2002 10:19 AMSubject: [] Re: IOKOBOS to JAMES> > > Should we not take into consideration that what we here is an indicationof how> > shameful the name Judas had become, given that this was the name bornby “the> > traitor”? We have a similar phenomenon — the origin of which is knownonly now to> > those who are interested in historical trivia — in the expression “yourname will be> > Mudd”.> >> > Yours,> >> > Jeffrey Gibson> > I didn’t mention or suggest it in my original post, because I thought this> reason for the book being called “Jude” instead of “Judas” would likely> suggest itself to everyone. I for one do not doubt that one reason, if not> THE reason, the book is called “Jude” is for precisely the reason Jeffrey> has stated. But … it would be nice to know if there are other legitimate> reasons for the name change/diminution/corruption. Though, as Carl has> said, this is maybe far afield of now of (Welch?!?!)> > > —> > Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon.)> > 1500 W. Pratt Blvd.> > Floor 1> > Chicago, Illinois 60626> > e-mail jgibson000 at attbi.com> > jgibson000 at hotmail.com> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: [jdelists at earthlink.net]> To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > >

Sentences in GreekSentences in Greek

IOKOBOS to JAMES Eric S. Weiss eweiss at gte.net
Thu Aug 8 17:39:19 EDT 2002

Sentences in Greek, possibles Luke 18:11 > How the NRSV almost had a Letter of Judas–> > This is from Bruce Metzger, *Reminiscences of an Octogenarian* (Peabody,> Mass.: Hendrickson, 1997), 91-92:Thanks for the information. My suggestion for any Bible editor orcommittee brave enough to do this would be to title it “Judas (Jude)” or”The Epistle of Judas (Jude)”.Maybe, just maybe, over time this would acclimate the Bible-reading publicto this fact so that one day an edition can be published that does callthe book “Judas”.Of course, the BEST solution might be to properly name Judas Iscariot,Jude, and all the other Judases as “Judah.” The NASB gives OT characters’names in their OT form, hence “Judah” appears in Matthew 1:3 where theGreek is IOUDAS. Most English translations, I think, also give OTcharacters their popular English OT name, e.g., Elijah, Moses, etc., andnot even transliterations of Hebrew (e.g., Moshe). Yet, the names of someof the apostles are given Greek transliterated names, e.g., Judas, buteven that isn’t true of all of them — i.e., we have Andrew, not ANDREAS,Peter and not PETROS, Paul and not PAULOS, etc. This inconsistency is thecause of the problem.Drop, where possible, the OS/AS endings from the English translations ofGreek names. [As an aside, I once found myself in the weird position ofarguing with a door-knocking evangelist that Elias (KJV New Testament) wasthe same person as Elijah, because he claimed they were two differentpeople and was promoting some doctrine based on that (I won’t name thesect).]How about:MatthewMarkLukeJohnTimothy 1,2TitusPhilemonJacob (James)John 1,2,3Judah (Jude)

Sentences in Greek, possiblesLuke 18:11

IOKOBOS to JAMES Paul Cheung CheungWH at abs.edu
Thu Aug 8 22:02:48 EDT 2002

Forgive me ! off topic request Another “Useful” Book Generally, the Chinese Bible versions maintain a consistent transliteration throughout, from Judah the son of Jacob and the southern kingdom of Judah, through Judas Iscariot, Judas the brother of Jesus, to the Epistle of Jude. This is true of the Chinese Union Version (the standard Protestant version). The Chinese Catholic transliteration does show a difference between Jude and Judas, with the latter having the additional “s” transliteration. Both the Catholic and Protestant transliterations use a different term for the New Testament geopolitical term IOUDAIA (Judea) versus the Old Testament IOUDA (Judah).The oddness of having an epistle named after Judas will be there, but this is simply due to the notoriety of Judas Iscariot. The oddness can be easily overcome, as can be seen in the Chinese Protestant situation. But I guess in the English world, tradition is so entrenched that “Jude” has since time immemorial both a life and identity of its own. Once you started on a different track, a good reason needs to be found to rejoin the original.Paul Cheung>>> “Eric S. Weiss” <eweiss at gte.net> 08/09/02 05:39AM >>>> How the NRSV almost had a Letter of Judas–> > This is from Bruce Metzger, *Reminiscences of an Octogenarian* (Peabody,> Mass.: Hendrickson, 1997), 91-92:Thanks for the information. My suggestion for any Bible editor orcommittee brave enough to do this would be to title it “Judas (Jude)” or”The Epistle of Judas (Jude)”.Maybe, just maybe, over time this would acclimate the Bible-reading publicto this fact so that one day an edition can be published that does callthe book “Judas”.Of course, the BEST solution might be to properly name Judas Iscariot,Jude, and all the other Judases as “Judah.” The NASB gives OT characters’names in their OT form, hence “Judah” appears in Matthew 1:3 where theGreek is IOUDAS. Most English translations, I think, also give OTcharacters their popular English OT name, e.g., Elijah, Moses, etc., andnot even transliterations of Hebrew (e.g., Moshe). Yet, the names of someof the apostles are given Greek transliterated names, e.g., Judas, buteven that isn’t true of all of them — i.e., we have Andrew, not ANDREAS,Peter and not PETROS, Paul and not PAULOS, etc. This inconsistency is thecause of the problem.Drop, where possible, the OS/AS endings from the English translations ofGreek names. [As an aside, I once found myself in the weird position ofarguing with a door-knocking evangelist that Elias (KJV New Testament) wasthe same person as Elijah, because he claimed they were two differentpeople and was promoting some doctrine based on that (I won’t name thesect).]How about:MatthewMarkLukeJohnTimothy 1,2TitusPhilemonJacob (James)John 1,2,3Judah (Jude)— home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/ You are currently subscribed to as: [cheungwh at abs.edu] To unsubscribe, forward this message to leave–114803X at franklin.oit.unc.edu To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu

Forgive me ! off topic requestAnother “Useful” Book

[] Syntax in James 1 Glenn Ansley Glenn at DeeperDevotion.com
Mon Dec 8 20:58:11 EST 2003

[] RE: pronouncing vowels [] RE: pronouncing vowels HelloI am currently studying the first chapter of James and am finding itdifficult to understand the structure of his writing. My problem is that hewrites in such a “train of thought” manner, that I have difficulty knowingwhere his more minor divisions fall within the text. Here are a coupleobservations and questions I have so far. I would appreciate any assistanceyou might be able to give me.It appears to me that, concerning the overall structure, he uses the termADELFOI to section off large trains of thought. (vs. 2, 9, 16, 19 and againat 2:1).At the same time, however, I have found that he makes great use of theinfinitive to separate more minor trains of thought. (vs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9,etc).My question is, in preparing a sermon, what syntactical signs should I belooking for in preparing my outline?Would you deliver verse 2-4, 2-8, 2-11, 2-18, or the whole chapter in asingle sermon?Please forgive me as I am new to using the Greek text for anything more thanpreparing for an exam.If this is off topic, please respond off list.Glenn AnsleyWake Forest, NCwww.deeperdevotion.com

[] RE: pronouncing vowels[] RE: pronouncing vowels

[] Syntax in James 1 Glenn Ansley Glenn at DeeperDevotion.com
Mon Dec 8 20:58:11 EST 2003

[] RE: pronouncing vowels [] RE: pronouncing vowels HelloI am currently studying the first chapter of James and am finding itdifficult to understand the structure of his writing. My problem is that hewrites in such a “train of thought” manner, that I have difficulty knowingwhere his more minor divisions fall within the text. Here are a coupleobservations and questions I have so far. I would appreciate any assistanceyou might be able to give me.It appears to me that, concerning the overall structure, he uses the termADELFOI to section off large trains of thought. (vs. 2, 9, 16, 19 and againat 2:1).At the same time, however, I have found that he makes great use of theinfinitive to separate more minor trains of thought. (vs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9,etc).My question is, in preparing a sermon, what syntactical signs should I belooking for in preparing my outline?Would you deliver verse 2-4, 2-8, 2-11, 2-18, or the whole chapter in asingle sermon?Please forgive me as I am new to using the Greek text for anything more thanpreparing for an exam.If this is off topic, please respond off list.Glenn AnsleyWake Forest, NCwww.deeperdevotion.com

[] RE: pronouncing vowels[] RE: pronouncing vowels

[] Syntax in James 1 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Tue Dec 9 08:36:50 EST 2003

[] KATADHLON ESTIN EI KATA THN OMOIOTHTA – Heb 7:15 [] LXX and Strongs In a message dated 12/8/2003 10:18:08 PM Eastern Standard Time, Glenn at DeeperDevotion.com writes:I am currently studying the first chapter of James and am finding itdifficult to understand the structure of his writing. My problem is that hewrites in such a “train of thought” manner, that I have difficulty knowingwhere his more minor divisions fall within the text. Here are a coupleobservations and questions I have so far. I would appreciate any assistanceyou might be able to give me.It appears to me that, concerning the overall structure, he uses the termADELFOI to section off large trains of thought. (vs. 2, 9, 16, 19 and againat 2:1).At the same time, however, I have found that he makes great use of theinfinitive to separate more minor trains of thought. (vs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9,etc).My question is, in preparing a sermon, what syntactical signs should I belooking for in preparing my outline?Would you deliver verse 2-4, 2-8, 2-11, 2-18, or the whole chapter in asingle sermon?This both is and is not a Greek question. Insofar as one uses syntactical signs to determine the various sections, I would suppose that it should be considered a Greek question. Just looking through the first chapter I note that James uses a series of imperatives which seem to deliniate the sections (with the exception of the makarism beginning with 1.12). Whether this practice continues throughout the epistle would take more time to determine than I feel I can devote at the moment.gfsomsel

[] KATADHLON ESTIN EI KATA THN OMOIOTHTA – Heb 7:15[] LXX and Strongs

[] Syntax in James 1 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Tue Dec 9 08:36:50 EST 2003

[] KATADHLON ESTIN EI KATA THN OMOIOTHTA – Heb 7:15 [] LXX and Strongs In a message dated 12/8/2003 10:18:08 PM Eastern Standard Time, Glenn at DeeperDevotion.com writes:I am currently studying the first chapter of James and am finding itdifficult to understand the structure of his writing. My problem is that hewrites in such a “train of thought” manner, that I have difficulty knowingwhere his more minor divisions fall within the text. Here are a coupleobservations and questions I have so far. I would appreciate any assistanceyou might be able to give me.It appears to me that, concerning the overall structure, he uses the termADELFOI to section off large trains of thought. (vs. 2, 9, 16, 19 and againat 2:1).At the same time, however, I have found that he makes great use of theinfinitive to separate more minor trains of thought. (vs. 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9,etc).My question is, in preparing a sermon, what syntactical signs should I belooking for in preparing my outline?Would you deliver verse 2-4, 2-8, 2-11, 2-18, or the whole chapter in asingle sermon?This both is and is not a Greek question. Insofar as one uses syntactical signs to determine the various sections, I would suppose that it should be considered a Greek question. Just looking through the first chapter I note that James uses a series of imperatives which seem to deliniate the sections (with the exception of the makarism beginning with 1.12). Whether this practice continues throughout the epistle would take more time to determine than I feel I can devote at the moment.gfsomsel

[] KATADHLON ESTIN EI KATA THN OMOIOTHTA – Heb 7:15[] LXX and Strongs

People who read this article also liked:

[AuthorRecommendedPosts]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>