Romans 1:1

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOS: addendum Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at mailhost.chi.ameritech.net
Fri Jul 9 15:15:52 EDT 1999

 

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOS Revelation and Tabernacles Here’s the data regarding instances of APOSTOLOS in what the TLG termsvaria(workswhose constituent elements come from a variety of dates) and incerta(works the dateof which is uncertain). This time I was able to search using bothAPOSTOLO andAPOSTOLW all at once.Jeffrey—————————————–Search for: apostolo apostolwSearch authors in the first century they wroteAllowable interval between words: Exact phrase—————————————–Date: VariaVitae Homeri: 1Concilia Oecumenica, ACO: 389Scholia in Aelium Aristidem: 6Scholia in Aeschinem: 1Scholia in Aeschylum: 2Scholia in Demosthenem: 7Scholia in Pindarum: 1Scholia in Sophoclem: 1Anthologia Graeca: 5Anthologiae Graecae Appendix: 4Matches in this century: 417—————————————–Date: IncertumMatches in this century: 0—————————————–Total number of matches: 417–Jeffrey B. Gibson7423 N. Sheridan Road #2AChicago, Illinois 60626e-mail jgibson000 at ameritech.net

 

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOSRevelation and Tabernacles

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOS: addendum Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at mailhost.chi.ameritech.net
Fri Jul 9 15:15:52 EDT 1999

 

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOS Revelation and Tabernacles Here’s the data regarding instances of APOSTOLOS in what the TLG termsvaria(workswhose constituent elements come from a variety of dates) and incerta(works the dateof which is uncertain). This time I was able to search using bothAPOSTOLO andAPOSTOLW all at once.Jeffrey—————————————–Search for: apostolo apostolwSearch authors in the first century they wroteAllowable interval between words: Exact phrase—————————————–Date: VariaVitae Homeri: 1Concilia Oecumenica, ACO: 389Scholia in Aelium Aristidem: 6Scholia in Aeschinem: 1Scholia in Aeschylum: 2Scholia in Demosthenem: 7Scholia in Pindarum: 1Scholia in Sophoclem: 1Anthologia Graeca: 5Anthologiae Graecae Appendix: 4Matches in this century: 417—————————————–Date: IncertumMatches in this century: 0—————————————–Total number of matches: 417–Jeffrey B. Gibson7423 N. Sheridan Road #2AChicago, Illinois 60626e-mail jgibson000 at ameritech.net

 

TLG Lookup on APOSTOLOSRevelation and Tabernacles

Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Steven Craig Miller scmiller at www.plantnet.com
Thu Apr 6 18:34:42 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: 1Cor 2:6 Next message: 1Cor 2:6 To: the participants of the Biblical-Greek list,I wonder if the syntax which understands KLHTOS APOSTOLOS as “called to be an apostle” strikes anyone else as strange or unusual? Also, are there any other examples (outside of Paul’s letters) of KLHTOS in apposition with another substantive with the resulting meaning “called to be <whatever>”?-Steven Craig MillerAlton, Illinois (USA)scmiller at www.plantnet.com

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Steven Craig Miller scmiller at www.plantnet.com
Fri Apr 7 13:15:03 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: kosmos being translated as “Christians” or “God’s people” or”the chosen” Next message: Eusebian Tables To: the participants of the Biblical-Greek list,I would like to elaborate on my earlier message. KLHTOS is used three times at Romans 1:1-8.(a) KLHTOS APOSTOLOS,(b) KLHTOI IHSOU CRISTOU, and(c) KLHTOIS hAGIOIS.The RV translated these passage as:(a) “called to be an apostle”;(b) “called to be Jesus Christ’s”; and(c) “called to be saints.”I wonder if they might be translated as:(a) “a called one, an apostle”;(b) “Jesus Christ’s called ones”; and(c) “sacred called ones.”The above translation takes KLHTOS as a substantive rather than an adjective. What do you think?-Steven Craig MillerAlton, Illinois (USA)scmiller at www.plantnet.com

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Ben Crick ben.crick at argonet.co.uk
Fri Apr 7 13:47:49 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Eusebian Tables Next message: kosmos being translated as “Christians” or “God’s people” or”the chosen” On Thu 6 Apr 2000 (17:34:42), scmiller at www.plantnet.com wrote:> I wonder if the syntax which understands KLHTOS APOSTOLOS as “called to> be an apostle” strikes anyone else as strange or unusual? Also, are there> any other examples (outside of Paul’s letters) of KLHTOS in apposition> with another substantive with the resulting meaning “called to be> <whatever>”? Dear Steven, There seems to be a similar construction in Romans 1:7 TOIS OUSIN EN hRWMHi AGAPHTOIS QEOU, *KLHTOIS hAGIOIS*, ktl and also in 1 Corinthians 1:2 THi EKKLHSIAi TOU QEOU THi OUSHi EN KORINQWi, hHGIASMENOIS EN CRISTWi IHSOU, *KLHTOIS hAGIOIS*, ktl ERRWSQE Ben– Revd Ben Crick, BA CF <ben.crick at argonet.co.uk> 232 Canterbury Road, Birchington, Kent, CT7 9TD (UK) http://www.cnetwork.co.uk/crick.htm

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Mr. Gary S. Dykes yhwh3in1 at lightspeed.net
Sat Apr 8 04:04:50 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Book Evaluation Requested Next message: Book Evaluation Requested Dear Mr. Miller (and Crick):In my work on Romans and I Cor. I treated both opening verses as saying this:”Paul, called, sent-one” OR”Paul, (a) called-one, (a) sent-one…”Viewing the adjectives as nominatives in simple opposition. Hence, Crick’s Rom. 1:7 does not fit the scheme.True, Paul is an apostle, but too often he is confused with the 12. His calling is distinct, and he really hammers this home in both of these epistles.The above is simply my opinion.Mr. Gary S. DykesSwanson’s Errata List — http://userzweb.lightspeed.net/yhwh3in1/Contributions welcomed

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Charles Skallerud karolus at wf.net
Sat Apr 8 10:30:31 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Eusebian Tables Next message: A short hello. As a footnote, ‘sent-one’ is fine, but people have a hard time acceptingthis as a translation. I’ve tried to find a way around ‘apostle’ for years.So far nothing works. Did you intend this as a technical footnote or atranslation? I missed the beginning of this thread so excuse me if I’m onthe wrong track.Charles Skallerud—– Original Message —–From: “Mr. Gary S. Dykes” <yhwh3in1 at lightspeed.net>To: “Biblical Greek” < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>Sent: Saturday, April 08, 2000 12:00 AMSubject: Re: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS> Dear Mr. Miller (and Crick):> > In my work on Romans and I Cor. I treated both opening verses as saying> this:> > “Paul, called, sent-one” OR> > “Paul, (a) called-one, (a) sent-one…”> > Viewing the adjectives as nominatives in simple opposition. Hence, Crick’s> Rom. 1:7 does not fit the scheme.> > True, Paul is an apostle, but too often he is confused with the 12. His> calling is distinct, and he really hammers this home in both of these> epistles.> > The above is simply my opinion.> > Mr. Gary S. Dykes> Swanson’s Errata List — http://userzweb.lightspeed.net/yhwh3in1/> Contributions welcomed> >> home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: karolus at wf.net> To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > >

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Theodore H Mann thmann at juno.com
Sat Apr 8 11:37:42 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: A short hello. Next message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS LIke Charles, I also have not followed this thread, but his commentprompts me to ask the following:I’d appreciate knowing at what point in history terms such as APOSTOLOSand DIAKONOS ceased being descriptive of functions only, and becametitles. When Paul identified himself as an apostle, was the term alreadybeing used as a title, as well as a description of function?Thanks.TedDr. Theodore “Ted” H. Mann / thmann at juno.comFax and Voice Mail: 1-562-750-5242http://www.homestead.com/ChristianResourcesLinks/index.htmlhttp://www.homestead.com/eLOGOS/index.htmlhttp://www.homestead.com/eIXQUS/index.html On Sat, 8 Apr 2000 09:30:31 -0500 “Charles Skallerud” <karolus at wf.net>writes:> As a footnote, ‘sent-one’ is fine, but people have a hard time > accepting> this as a translation. I’ve tried to find a way around ‘apostle’ > for years.> So far nothing works. Did you intend this as a technical footnote > or a> translation? I missed the beginning of this thread so excuse me if > I’m on> the wrong track.> > Charles Skallerud> > > —– Original Message —–> From: “Mr. Gary S. Dykes” <yhwh3in1 at lightspeed.net>> To: “Biblical Greek” < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>> Sent: Saturday, April 08, 2000 12:00 AM> Subject: Re: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS> > > > Dear Mr. Miller (and Crick):> >> > In my work on Romans and I Cor. I treated both opening verses as > saying> > this:> >> > “Paul, called, sent-one” OR> >> > “Paul, (a) called-one, (a) sent-one…”> >> > Viewing the adjectives as nominatives in simple opposition. Hence, > Crick’s> > Rom. 1:7 does not fit the scheme.> >> > True, Paul is an apostle, but too often he is confused with the > 12. His> > calling is distinct, and he really hammers this home in both of > these> > epistles.> >> > The above is simply my opinion.> >> > Mr. Gary S. Dykes> > Swanson’s Errata List — http://userzweb.lightspeed.net/yhwh3in1/> > Contributions welcomed> >> > —> > home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/> > You are currently subscribed to as: karolus at wf.net> > To unsubscribe, forward this message to> $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> > To subscribe, send a message to > subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> >> >> >> > >> home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: thmann at juno.com> To unsubscribe, forward this message to > $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to > subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > ________________________________________________________________YOU’RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!Try it today – there’s no risk! For your FREE software, visit:http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Steven Craig Miller scmiller at www.plantnet.com
Sat Apr 8 12:48:39 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Next message: Eusebian Tables To: the participants of the Biblical-Greek list,Here is another attempt to make sense of KLHTOS APOSTOLOS (Rm 1:1).The Greek KLHTOS has been translated as “called to be”; so that Paul was “called to be an apostle”; and that the Romans were “called to belong to Jesus Christ” as well as “called to be saints.” But in the LXX the term KLHTOS often means “guest” at Jud 14:11; 2 Kings 15:11; 3 Kings 1:41; Zeph 1:17; and 3 Macc 5:14. So I wonder if KLHTOS APOSTOLOS might mean “guest apostle.” Another idea is that KLHTOS APOSTOLOS might mean “invited apostle” Compare Mt 22:14 “many are invited, but few are chosen” (or how about “many are guests, but few are chosen”?).As for finding a translation for APOSTOLOS, how about “delegate” (per BAGD)? And for APOSTOLH (such as in Romans 1:5) how about “commission”?<< [1] Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus, a guest delegate … [6] among whom you too are Jesus Christ’s guests, [7] to those being in Rome, God’s beloved and sacred guests: … >> (Romans 1:1a,6-7a).One nice thing about this is that “a guest delegate” is a much smother reading than the translation “a called one, an apostle.”What do you think?-Steven Craig MillerAlton, Illinois (USA)scmiller at www.plantnet.com

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Charles Skallerud karolus at wf.net
Sat Apr 8 22:08:32 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Fronting & Point of Departure Next message: “Magdalene Papyrus”? After many unsuccessful attempts I do not look down on any effort. Still Ihave to say that ‘guest delegate’ sounds like a UNESCO position orsomething. I know what you mean and others in this discussion know what youmean, but I am afraid it doesn’t fly. I wish I could offer an alternative.We are stuck with ‘apostle’ which, of course, is not a translation at all.Maybe this original transliteration is a clue that nobody else was about todo any better. After all it might be just like ‘baptism.’ What can weoffer as an alternative? Dipping? Your grasp of the original is useful butI fear your audience is restricted to Greek fanatics.Charles Skallerud—– Original Message —–From: “Steven Craig Miller” <scmiller at www.plantnet.com>To: “Biblical Greek” < at franklin.oit.unc.edu>Sent: Saturday, April 08, 2000 11:48 AMSubject: Re: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS> To: the participants of the Biblical-Greek list,> > Here is another attempt to make sense of KLHTOS APOSTOLOS (Rm 1:1).> > The Greek KLHTOS has been translated as “called to be”; so that Paul was> “called to be an apostle”; and that the Romans were “called to belong to> Jesus Christ” as well as “called to be saints.” But in the LXX the term> KLHTOS often means “guest” at Jud 14:11; 2 Kings 15:11; 3 Kings 1:41; Zeph> 1:17; and 3 Macc 5:14. So I wonder if KLHTOS APOSTOLOS might mean “guest> apostle.” Another idea is that KLHTOS APOSTOLOS might mean “invited> apostle” Compare Mt 22:14 “many are invited, but few are chosen” (or how> about “many are guests, but few are chosen”?).> > As for finding a translation for APOSTOLOS, how about “delegate” (per> BAGD)? And for APOSTOLH (such as in Romans 1:5) how about “commission”?> > << [1] Paul, a slave of Christ Jesus, a guest delegate … [6] among whom> you too are Jesus Christ’s guests, [7] to those being in Rome, God’s> beloved and sacred guests: … >> (Romans 1:1a,6-7a).> > One nice thing about this is that “a guest delegate” is a much smother> reading than the translation “a called one, an apostle.”> > What do you think?> > -Steven Craig Miller> Alton, Illinois (USA)> scmiller at www.plantnet.com> > >> home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: karolus at wf.net> To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > >

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Steven Craig Miller scmiller at www.plantnet.com
Sun Apr 9 09:32:05 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Swanson’s Galatians and NA Next message: “Magdalene Papyrus”? To: Charles Skallerud and the participants of the Biblical-Greek list,<< After many unsuccessful attempts I do not look down on any effort. Still I have to say that ‘guest delegate’ sounds like a UNESCO position or something. I know what you mean and others in this discussion know what you mean, but I am afraid it doesn’t fly. >>IMO, sounding like a “UNESCO position or something” is a step forward. And so IMO “delegate” is an improvement over “apostle.”But as for the translation “guest,” I’m not as certain. The traditional interpretation of KLHTOS has been that Paul was called by God to be an apostle/delegate, whereas translating KLHTOS as “guest” offers different possibilities, perhaps KLHTOS means that Paul was a “delegate” to and not from the Gentiles.The point of using the same term (KLHTOS) in verses 6 & 7 might be that just as Paul is a “guest” among the Gentiles, so too the believers in Rome are “guests” of Jesus Christ, his “sacred guests.”Criticisms and/or suggestions are welcome.-Steven Craig MillerAlton, Illinois (USA)scmiller at www.plantnet.com

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Sun Apr 9 15:03:40 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Swanson’s Galatians and NA Next message: Fronting & Point of Departure In a message dated 4/9/2000 7:28:27 AM Central Standard Time, scmiller at www.plantnet.com writes:<< << After many unsuccessful attempts I do not look down on any effort. Still I have to say that ‘guest delegate’ sounds like a UNESCO position or something. I know what you mean and others in this discussion know what you mean, but I am afraid it doesn’t fly. >> IMO, sounding like a “UNESCO position or something” is a step forward. And so IMO “delegate” is an improvement over “apostle.” But as for the translation “guest,” I’m not as certain. The traditional interpretation of KLHTOS has been that Paul was called by God to be an apostle/delegate, whereas translating KLHTOS as “guest” offers different possibilities, perhaps KLHTOS means that Paul was a “delegate” to and not from the Gentiles. The point of using the same term (KLHTOS) in verses 6 & 7 might be that just as Paul is a “guest” among the Gentiles, so too the believers in Rome are “guests” of Jesus Christ, his “sacred guests.” Criticisms and/or suggestions are welcome. >>Personally, I agree that it won’t fly. I don’t even think that it’s an improvement. Stick to apostle and baptism. Everyone understands that. Oh, so you want to define the term a bit to give some understanding of the concept lying behind it? A laudable goal. I suggest a note.gfsomsel

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Sun Apr 9 18:04:47 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: doulos Next message: logos – presocratic – off topic I’ve never understood what’s wrong with “missionary” for APOSTOLOS–itseems to me that the word carries pretty much the same function.As for KLHTOS, I suspect it really needs to be glossed in a translationanyway, but I’ve sometimes thought “recipient of the call” expresses thesense–or perhaps better, “respondent to the call.” I don’t think “guest”is wrong as such, but it really needs to be distinguished somehow fromother uses of “guest.” What I like about it, however, is its readylinkability to the Synoptic theme of the “call” or “invitation” to thetable set and served by Jesus. To the extent that sharing the supper of theLord is a term for a believer, there’s a certain propriety to the usage.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics/Washington UniversityOne Brookings Drive/St. Louis, MO, USA 63130/(314) 935-4018Home: 7222 Colgate Ave./St. Louis, MO 63130/(314) 726-5649cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Carlton Winbery winberyc at speedgate.net
Mon Apr 10 18:34:04 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Book Evaluation Requested Next message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS >I’ve never understood what’s wrong with “missionary” for APOSTOLOS–it>seems to me that the word carries pretty much the same function.> >As for KLHTOS, I suspect it really needs to be glossed in a translation>anyway, but I’ve sometimes thought “recipient of the call” expresses the>sense–or perhaps better, “respondent to the call.” I don’t think “guest”>is wrong as such, but it really needs to be distinguished somehow from>other uses of “guest.” What I like about it, however, is its ready>linkability to the Synoptic theme of the “call” or “invitation” to the>table set and served by Jesus. To the extent that sharing the supper of the>Lord is a term for a believer, there’s a certain propriety to the usage.> >The article on APOSTOLOS in TDNT emphasizes that the word APOSTOLOS carrieda note of authority. Paul seems to assume that if he won the agumentwhether or not he was an apostle, then they had to listen to him, i.e,, hehad the authority to do what he was doing. Apostleship as Paul conceives itmay carry a note of authority that is not always clearly a part of”missionary.” You think?KLHTOS is an adjective. APOSTOLOS is a noun. Does not the adjective heremodify the noun even though it does have the article? I gain some insightfrom thinking that Paul is distinguishing his office by saying, “(I am) aslave of Christ Jesus, a called apostle who is set apart for the gospel ofGod.” The idea of called in the adjective is a passive idea so that anyonereading it would clearly understand that Paul is claiming that God calledhim. The stronger statement defending his apostleship in Gal. 1:1 isprobably not far from his mind. His office is as a “called (by God)apostle” and not one from men or through a man but . . .Dr. Carlton L. WinberyFoggleman Professor of ReligionLouisiana Collegewinbery at speedgate.netwinbery at andria.lacollege.eduPh. 1 318 448 6103 hmPh. 1 318 487 7241 off

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Carlton Winbery winberyc at speedgate.net
Mon Apr 10 18:39:15 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Next message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS >>>>even though it does (NOT) have the article?<<<<Carlton

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Carlton Winbery winberyc at speedgate.net
Mon Apr 10 19:59:20 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Next message: Granville Sharp and 2 Thess 1:12 correction>>>>even though it does (NOT) have the article?<<<<Carlton

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Steven Craig Miller scmiller at plantnet.com
Tue Apr 11 09:25:35 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Granville Sharp and 2 Thess 1:12 Next message: kosmos being translated as “Christians” or “God’s people” or”the chosen” To: Carlton L. Winbery,<< The article on APOSTOLOS in TDNT emphasizes that the word APOSTOLOS carried a note of authority. >>In that case, the translation “delegate” would seem to be better than “missionary.”<< KLHTOS is an adjective. APOSTOLOS is a noun. Does not the adjective here modify the noun even though it does not have the article? I gain some insight from thinking that Paul is distinguishing his office by saying, “(I am) a slave of Christ Jesus, a called apostle who is set apart for the gospel of God.” The idea of called in the adjective is a passive idea so that anyone reading it would clearly understand that Paul is claiming that God called him. >>All one can really be certain is that KLHTOS implies that someone had called or invited Paul. Your assumption that this someone must be God is traditional, but by no means certain.-Steven Craig MillerAlton, Illinois (USA)scmiller at plantnet.com

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Theodore H Mann thmann at juno.com
Tue Apr 11 11:46:05 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: kosmos being translated as “Christians” or “God’s people” or”the chosen” Next message: doulos It seems to me than even “delegate” doesn’t imply the kind of authoritywe ascribe to “apostle.”Ted Mannthmann at juno.comOn Tue, 11 Apr 2000 08:25:35 -0500 Steven Craig Miller<scmiller at plantnet.com> writes:> To: Carlton L. Winbery,> > << The article on APOSTOLOS in TDNT emphasizes that the word > APOSTOLOS > carried a note of authority. >>> > In that case, the translation “delegate” would seem to be better > than > “missionary.”> > << KLHTOS is an adjective. APOSTOLOS is a noun. Does not the > adjective here > modify the noun even though it does not have the article? I gain > some > insight from thinking that Paul is distinguishing his office by > saying, “(I > am) a slave of Christ Jesus, a called apostle who is set apart for > the > gospel of God.” The idea of called in the adjective is a passive > idea so > that anyone reading it would clearly understand that Paul is > claiming that > God called him. >>> > All one can really be certain is that KLHTOS implies that someone > had > called or invited Paul. Your assumption that this someone must be > God is > traditional, but by no means certain.> > -Steven Craig Miller> Alton, Illinois (USA)> scmiller at plantnet.com> > >> home page: http://sunsite.unc.edu/> You are currently subscribed to as: thmann at juno.com> To unsubscribe, forward this message to > $subst(‘Email.Unsub’)> To subscribe, send a message to > subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu> > ________________________________________________________________YOU’RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!Try it today – there’s no risk! For your FREE software, visit:http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Mr. Gary S. Dykes yhwh3in1 at lightspeed.net
Tue Apr 11 13:59:58 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: doulos Next message: idiom ‘give praise’ (exactly) On 04/10/00, “Carlton Winbery <winberyc at speedgate.net>” wrote:> > KLHTOS is an adjective. APOSTOLOS is a noun. Does not the adjective here> modify the noun even though it does have the article? I gain some insight> from thinking that Paul is distinguishing his office by saying, “(I am) a> slave of Christ Jesus, a called apostle who is set apart for the gospel of> God.” The idea of called in the adjective is a passive idea so that anyone> reading it would clearly understand that Paul is claiming that God called> him. The stronger statement defending his apostleship in Gal. 1:1 is> probably not far from his mind. His office is as a “called (by God)> apostle” and not one from men or through a man but . . .> > > Dr. Carlton L. Winbery> Foggleman Professor of ReligionAdditional comments by Dykes:Yes, the above is ceretainly possible, seeing it as an adjective-noun combination, as others do. But like DOULOJ at Romans 1:1 – refer the Winbery and Brooks p. 7, it can also be functioning in apposition.APOSTOLOJ can certainly be an adjective, or a noun, though it is rarely described in the literature as an adjective, it can certainly function as one, in that it describes a noun (akin to simple apposition).Syriac scribes in translating I Cor. 1:1, added a conjunction between “(a) sent one” and “(a) called-one”, thus linking them in their minds. In Romans 1:1, we have 3 nominatives, each functioning in the same manner as nominatives in opposition. Also a I Cor. 1:1, papyrus 61 MAY omit “called” along with 02, 06, and 0151, and the Latin d. For KLHTOJ minuscule 1875 actually reads DOULOJ.Your proposal is certainly better than adding a “to be” as in some English translations. Am I correct in suggesting that like “DOULOJ” that both “KLHTOJ” and APOSTOLOJ” can be either a noun or an adjective? I know what the literature says, along with nearly all known dictionaries, but I want your personal input.Thanks,Mr. Gary S. DykesSwanson’s Errata List — http://userzweb.lightspeed.net/yhwh3in1/Contributions accepted, download beautiful public domain Greek font!!

 

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Rom 1:1 KLHTOS APOSTOLOS Carlton Winbery winberyc at speedgate.net
Tue Apr 11 21:26:14 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: “Man and Message”, by Callow Next message: Credits externally Gary Dykes wrote;>Your proposal is certainly better than adding a “to be” as in some English>translations. Am I correct in suggesting that like “DOULOJ” that both>“KLHTOJ” and APOSTOLOJ” can be either a noun or an adjective? I know what>the literature says, along with nearly all known dictionaries, but I want>your personal input.> > Yes, I think so as any adjective can be used as a noun, but it is rarewithout the article in front but not unheard of. Any noun can modify bybeing in apposition or by being in a situation to understand a predicativerelationship. The more common use of a noun to modify is to use thegenitive case as with Cristou IU (Christ’s slave), but you are correct asfar as possibilities are concerned. I also agree about the parallelism ofthe three elements in this verse, “Paul, Christ’s slave, called apostle,and set apart for . . .”Dr. Carlton L. WinberyFoggleman Professor of ReligionLouisiana Collegewinbery at speedgate.netwinbery at andria.lacollege.eduPh. 1 318 448 6103 hmPh. 1 318 487 7241 off

 

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3 thoughts on “Romans 1:1

  1. He introduced himself im his letters as the Lord’s Apostle but I don’t think any body was kissing his ring or anything. He was probably a very unassuming person. Don’t forget they had a real handle on manly in those days. Not like today. Girly boys and starlet’s behind the pulpit. Grown men. Pentecostal preachers with diamond earrings. Talking about losing their temper if their Starbucks ain’t right. Oh boy…

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