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Acts 13:22

David Lim wrote:
Alan Patterson wrote:Barry wrote:
Well, then, what do you think it means? Yes, it's God's heart, but it describes David as being a man after God's heart, following God. How can it mean otherwise than being devoted to God?
It is not DAVID's devotion to, but it is GOD's appreciation of.... At least, that's how it appears on the surface, imo.
I don't see "appreciation" written in that phrase, but I see the same that Barry says. The phrase just means "a man who does things according to God's heart". That is pretty much the same as "a man devoted to God".
Right. It's telling us what David is like, not what God is like. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — May 2nd, 2014, 7:47 pm
 
Alan Patterson wrote: Barry wrote:
Well, then, what do you think it means? Yes, it's God's heart, but it describes David as being a man after God's heart, following God. How can it mean otherwise than being devoted to God?
It is not DAVID's devotion to, but it is GOD's appreciation of.... At least, that's how it appears on the surface, imo.
I don't see "appreciation" written in that phrase, but I see the same that Barry says. The phrase just means "a man who does things according to God's heart". That is pretty much the same as "a man devoted to God". Statistics: Posted by David Lim — May 2nd, 2014, 8:04 am
Barry wrote:
Well, then, what do you think it means? Yes, it's God's heart, but it describes David as being a man after God's heart, following God. How can it mean otherwise than being devoted to God?
It is not DAVID's devotion to, but it is GOD's appreciation of.... At least, that's how it appears on the surface, imo. Statistics: Posted by Alan Patterson — April 30th, 2014, 5:20 am
 
Alan Patterson wrote: Barry wrote:
So in other words, it means to be wholeheartedly devoted to God
But this is GOD's heart Luke is talking about, not David's. David is a man 'after God's heart.' So, it seems very difficult for this to mean devoted to God. I am sure I have misunderstood your answer here.
Well, then, what do you think it means? Yes, it's God's heart, but it describes David as being a man after God's heart, following God. How can it mean otherwise than being devoted to God? Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 29th, 2014, 7:41 am
Barry wrote:
So in other words, it means to be wholeheartedly devoted to God
But this is GOD's heart Luke is talking about, not David's. David is a man 'after God's heart.' So, it seems very difficult for this to mean devoted to God. I am sure I have misunderstood your answer here. Statistics: Posted by Alan Patterson — April 29th, 2014, 6:58 am
 
Stephen Hughes wrote:
cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:Wow! Thanks for typing out such a long entry from the dictionary. Such an herculean feat!
As the commercial blurb goes, "You too can be a Hercules by using a simple clip and paste from Logos software, which will even automatically insert the reference a second time, when you add on a second section from the same LSJ entry."
What becomes of a sincere expression of gratitude when the thing one is grateful for, was in fact not so painstakingly undertaken as one had believed? Should I apologise for my ungrounded effervescence or rephrase the herculean comment to read "herculean in as far as Hercules had a tranqiliser gun to deal with the Nemian Lion, hired a professional cleaning company to deal with the stables, and was airlifted in by helicopter to get access to the golden fleece" (perhaps I've mix up my myths there a little). I thought Logos only had an earlier version version of the dictionary in it's arsenal of tools to tackle the text.
No, we really thought you were being funny... In fact, Logos has the latest edition, BDAG, and has for years. It was the first thing I got when I decided to go the Logos route. I guarantee that if I was typing it would in no way or form resemble "Herculean!" :lol: :roll: Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 28th, 2014, 8:06 pm
 
Stephen Hughes wrote: ... What becomes of a sincere expression of gratitude when the thing one is grateful for, was in fact not so painstakingly undertaken as one had believed? Should I apologise for my ungrounded effervescence or rephrase the herculean comment to read "herculean in as far as Hercules had a tranqiliser gun to deal with the Nemian Lion, hired a professional cleaning company to deal with the stables, and was airlifted in by helicopter to get access to the golden fleece" (perhaps I've mix up my myths there a little)..
:D :D I had forgotten that Hercules was a shipmate of Jason on the Argo but my recollection is that Hercules' toy-boy was snatched away by nymphs and the tough guy didn't continue on the voyage to Phasis to fetch the fleece. Just don't try to fleece us with all that gold from the stable of Augeas! :D :D Statistics: Posted by cwconrad — April 28th, 2014, 3:34 pm
 
cwconrad wrote:
Stephen Hughes wrote:Wow! Thanks for typing out such a long entry from the dictionary. Such an herculean feat!
As the commercial blurb goes, "You too can be a Hercules by using a simple clip and paste from Logos software, which will even automatically insert the reference a second time, when you add on a second section from the same LSJ entry."
What becomes of a sincere expression of gratitude when the thing one is grateful for, was in fact not so painstakingly undertaken as one had believed? Should I apologise for my ungrounded effervescence or rephrase the herculean comment to read "herculean in as far as Hercules had a tranqiliser gun to deal with the Nemian Lion, hired a professional cleaning company to deal with the stables, and was airlifted in by helicopter to get access to the golden fleece" (perhaps I've mix up my myths there a little). I thought Logos only had an earlier version version of the dictionary in it's arsenal of tools to tackle the text. Statistics: Posted by Stephen Hughes — April 28th, 2014, 3:13 pm
γελῶ σφόδρα...οὐχί Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 28th, 2014, 1:04 pm
 
Stephen Hughes wrote: Wow! Thanks for typing out such a long entry from the dictionary. Such an herculean feat!
As the commercial blurb goes, "You too can be a Hercules by using a simple clip and paste from Logos software, which will even automatically insert the reference a second time, when you add on a second section from the same LSJ entry." Statistics: Posted by cwconrad — April 28th, 2014, 12:54 pm
Wow! Thanks for typing out such a long entry from the dictionary. Such an herculean feat! Statistics: Posted by Stephen Hughes — April 28th, 2014, 8:04 am
 
Stephen Hughes wrote:
Barry Hofstetter wrote:So in other words, it means to be wholeheartedly devoted to God.
What meaning of κατά are you putting that into?
"According to..." γ. of a standard of any other kind κ. τ. χρόνον ὃν ἠκρίβωσεν in accordance w. the time which he had ascertained Mt 2:16. κ. τ. πίστιν ὑμῶν acc. to your faith 9:29. κ. τ. δύναμιν acc. to his capability 25:15 (Just., D. 139, 4; Tat. 12, 3; cp. Just., A II, 13, 6 κ. δύναμιν). Cp. Lk 1:38; 2:29; Ro 8:4; 10:2; Eph 4:7. ἀνὴρ κ. τ. καρδίαν μου Ac 13:22 (καρδία 1bε). Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., & Bauer, W. (2000). A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ε. of the emotions, wishes, desires (Theognis 1, 366; Bacchylides 17, 18): ἐπιθυμίαι τῶν κ. desires of the heart Ro 1:24. ἐπὶ τὴν κ. σου ἀνέβη ἡ ἐπιθυμία τ. πονηρίας Hv 1, 1, 8; cp. Hs 5, 1, 5. ἐνθύμησις m 4, 1, 2; 6, 2, 7. μὴ ἀναβαινέτω σου ἐπὶ τὴν κ. περὶ γυναικός m 4, 1, 1; cp. Hv 1, 2, 4; Mt 5:28.—6:21; 12:34f; Lk 6:45; 12:34; 24:32 (s. καίω 1b); Js 3:14; 5:8. Of joy: ηὐφράνθη ἡ κ. Ac 2:26 (Ps 15:9). χαρήσεται ἡ κ. J 16:22. Of sorrow: ἡ λύπη πεπλήρωκεν τὴν κ. 16:6; λύπη ἐγκάθηται εἰς τὴν κ. grief sits in the heart Hm 10, 3, 3. ἡ κ. ταράσσεται (Job 37:1; Ps 142:4) J 14:1, 27; ὀδύνη τῇ κ. Ro 9:2. συνοχὴ καρδίας anguish of heart 2 Cor 2:4; διαπρίεσθαι ταῖς κ. Ac 7:54; κατανυγῆναι τὴν κ. 2:37; συνθρύπτειν τὴν κ. 21:13. κ. συντετριμμένη a broken heart B 2:10; 1 Cl 18:17b (Ps 50:19). συντετριμμένοι τὴν κ. Lk 4:18 v.l. παρακαλεῖν τὰς κ. Eph 6:22; Col 2:2; 4:8; 2 Th 2:17. Of hope (Ps 111:7) Hm 12, 5, 2. Of repentance ἐξ ὅλης κ. Hv 3, 13, 4; m 5, 1, 7; 12, 6, 1. Of sensitivity about doing what is right (1 Km 24:6; 2 Km 24:10) 1J 3:19, 20, 21 (s. ASkrinjar, Verb. Dom. 20, ’40, 340–50). Of a wish εὐδοκία τῆς κ. (s. εὐδοκία 3) Ro 10:1. Of a longing for God τὴν κ. ἔχειν πρὸς κύριον Hm 10, 1, 6. ἐπιστρέφεσθαι πρὸς τὸν κύριον ἐξ ὅλης τῆς κ. 12, 6, 2 (cp. 3 Km 8:48). προσέρχεσθαι μετὰ ἀληθινῆς κ. with sincere desire (cp. Is 38:3; TestDan 5:3 ἀλ. κ.) Hb 10:22. Cp. the opposite Ac 7:39.—Also of the wish or desire of God ἀνὴρ κατὰ τὴν κ. (τοῦ θεοῦ) after God’s heart i.e. as God wishes him to be Ac 13:22 (cp. 1 Km 13:14). Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., & Bauer, W. (2000). A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 27th, 2014, 9:29 pm
 
Barry Hofstetter wrote: So in other words, it means to be wholeheartedly devoted to God.
What meaning of κατά are you putting that into? Statistics: Posted by Stephen Hughes — April 27th, 2014, 9:43 am
 
Alan Patterson wrote: 22 και μεταστησας αυτον ηγειρεν τον δαυιδ αυτοις εις βασιλεα ω και ειπεν μαρτυρησας ευρον δαυιδ τον του ιεσσαι [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου ος ποιησει παντα τα θεληματα μου Is [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου an idiom, or is it simpler? The surface level meaning is plain enough, but I've heard (can't remember where) that this is an idiom meaning ??????????? (can't remember that also).
① heart as seat of physical, spiritual and mental life (as freq. in Gk. lit.), fig. extension of ‘heart’ as an organ of the body (Il. 13, 282 al.), a mng. not found in our lit. Arndt, W., Danker, F. W., & Bauer, W. (2000). A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. So in other words, it means to be wholeheartedly devoted to God. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 27th, 2014, 8:39 am
22 και μεταστησας αυτον ηγειρεν τον δαυιδ αυτοις εις βασιλεα ω και ειπεν μαρτυρησας ευρον δαυιδ τον του ιεσσαι [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου ος ποιησει παντα τα θεληματα μου Is [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου an idiom, or is it simpler? The surface level meaning is plain enough, but I've heard (can't remember where) that this is an idiom meaning ??????????? (can't remember that also). Statistics: Posted by Alan Patterson — April 26th, 2014, 3:48 pm
22 και μεταστησας αυτον ηγειρεν τον δαυιδ αυτοις εις βασιλεα ω και ειπεν μαρτυρησας ευρον δαυιδ τον του ιεσσαι [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου ος ποιησει παντα τα θεληματα μου Is [ανδρα] κατα την καρδιαν μου an idiom, or is it simpler? The surface level meaning is plain enough, but I've heard (can't remember where) that this is an idiom meaning ??????????? (can't remember that also). Statistics: Posted by Alan Patterson — April 26th, 2014, 3:48 pm