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John 7:49

Rhoover60 wrote: J. Robie, thanks. I read the passage from Jannaris and noticed this phrase, "Nevertheless, it is not rigidly adhered to even by A[ttic?] writers. etc." This points out what probably happened in my thinking. I falsely imagined that language had a mathematical precision to it!! Hopefully, I will learn from this. More Regards.
No such thing as mathematical precision in any language. In the case of the neuter plural/singular verb, the verb most often goes into the plural when people are the referent of the noun, though even that is not an absolute usage. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — January 1st, 2017, 9:16 am
 
Rhoover60 wrote: J. Robie, thanks. I read the passage from Jannaris and noticed this phrase, "Nevertheless, it is not rigidly adhered to even by A[ttic?] writers. etc." This points out what probably happened in my thinking. I falsely imagined that language had a mathematical precision to it!! Hopefully, I will learn from this. More Regards.
No such thing as mathematical precision in any language. In the case of the neuter plural/singular verb, the verb most often goes into the plural when people are the referent of the noun, though even that is not an absolute usage. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — January 1st, 2017, 9:16 am
J. Robie, thanks. I read the passage from Jannaris and noticed this phrase, "Nevertheless, it is not rigidly adhered to even by A[ttic?] writers. etc." This points out what probably happened in my thinking. I falsely imagined that language had a mathematical precision to it!! Hopefully, I will learn from this. More Regards. Statistics: Posted by Rhoover60 — December 31st, 2016, 12:57 pm
 
Rhoover60 wrote: My thanks to you, J. Robie. I remember similar guidelines regarding plural neuter subjects and singular verbs [or is it the other way around? I will have to check on that.] Regards.
You got it right - when the subject is a neuter plural, the verb is usually singular. They do that just to trick us. There's a really good description of Concord starting on page 313 of Jannaris. I wish I had Jannaris in text form. Statistics: Posted by Jonathan Robie — December 31st, 2016, 8:06 am
My thanks to you, J. Robie. I remember similar guidelines regarding plural neuter subjects and singular verbs [or is it the other way around? I will have to check on that.] Regards. Statistics: Posted by Rhoover60 — December 30th, 2016, 7:47 pm
In English we might say, "But this crowd, which knows nothing of the law - they are accursed!" And we wouldn't worry so much about the lack of agreement, the focus shifts from a crowd as a unit to the people in the crowd in the course of the sentence. In Greek, collective nouns like λαός, ὄχλος usually take a plural verb - or here, a plural adjective form - as if the subject were a bunch of individuals. See Smyth §950:
950. With singular collective substantives (996) denoting persons and with like words implying a plural, the verb may stand in the plural. Thus, ““τὸ στρατόπεδον ἐν αἰτίᾳ ἔχοντες τὸν Ἆγιν ἀνεχώρουν” the army returned holding Agis at fault” T. 5.60, ““τοιαῦτα ἀκούσα_σα ἡ πόλις Ἀ_γησίλα_ον εἵλοντο βασιλέα_” the city, after hearing such arguments, chose Agesilaus king” X. H. 3.3.4. So with βουλή senate, μέρος part, πλῆθος multitude, δῆμος people, ὄχλος throng.
Statistics: Posted by Jonathan Robie — December 30th, 2016, 6:36 pm
Why would the predicate adjective ἐπάρατοί be plural and the subject ὁ ὄχλος be singular? ἀλλὰ ὁ ὄχλος οὗτος ὁ μὴ γινώσκων τὸν νόμον ἐπάρατοί εἰσιν. Statistics: Posted by Rhoover60 — December 29th, 2016, 11:43 pm