1 Corinthians 14:26

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant C.A. (Kees) Langeveld langeveld at solcon.nl
Mon Nov 5 13:24:22 EST 2001

 

Constituent order Constituent order The frequent use of masculine nouns such as hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi, ALLWi,DIERMHNEUTHS etc. in 1 Cor. 14:26-33, which deals with speaking in thechurchmeetings, together with the fact that in vers 34-35 women are said torefrain from speaking in the churchmeetings, provide a valid argument forthe thesis that in 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant or thought of. In otherwords, 1 Cor 14:34-35 provides a reason for taking those nouns asnon-generic, that is, as referring to men only.Carl W. Conrad has given me his opinion on this matter. I would like to hearother optinions and arguments.Regards,Kees Langeveld, Bennekom, Netherlands

 

Constituent orderConstituent order

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Mon Nov 5 15:46:25 EST 2001

 

forground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModel forground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModel At 7:24 PM +0100 11/5/01, C.A. (Kees) Langeveld wrote:>The frequent use of masculine nouns such as hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi, ALLWi,>DIERMHNEUTHS etc. in 1 Cor. 14:26-33, which deals with speaking in the>churchmeetings, together with the fact that in vers 34-35 women are said to>refrain from speaking in the churchmeetings, provide a valid argument for>the thesis that in 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant or thought of. In other>words, 1 Cor 14:34-35 provides a reason for taking those nouns as>non-generic, that is, as referring to men only.>Carl W. Conrad has given me his opinion on this matter. I would like to hear>other optinions and arguments.I too welcome alternative opinions and arguments (so long as they stick towhat the Greek text is saying), but lest there be any question of what Iresponded, here it is:At 2:03 PM -0500 11/3/01, Carl W. Conrad wrote:> … I would say>that all of these masculine pronouns (hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi, ALLWi) and>even the noun DIERMHNEUTHS are generic–there is no reason to suppose that>any one of them can only refer to a male person.— Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)Most months: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.comWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

 

forground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModelforground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModel

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant Mark Wilson emory2oo2 at hotmail.com
Mon Nov 5 22:06:12 EST 2001

 

forground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModel Jerusalem location C.A. (Kees) Langeveld wrote:——> >The frequent use of masculine nouns such as hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi, >ALLWi,> >DIERMHNEUTHS etc. in 1 Cor. 14:26-33, which deals with speaking in the> >churchmeetings, together with the fact that in vers 34-35 women are said >to> >refrain from speaking in the churchmeetings, provide a valid argument for> >the thesis that in 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant or thought of. In other> >words, 1 Cor 14:34-35 provides a reason for taking those nouns as> >non-generic, that is, as referring to men only.——A non-generic use of any noun can only be employed in anon-generic CONTEXT. The issue would be whether or not the writerhas developed a context wherein non-generic or generic usagescan function.If you hold to a non-generic use in vss 26-33, you would have todemonstrate that verses 34ff are a PART OF that section.My thoughts,Mark Wilson_________________________________________________________________Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp

 

forground & background, boundry markers -Longacre’sModelJerusalem location

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Tue Nov 6 05:39:03 EST 2001

 

ENDUW/ENDUOMAI MIDDLE AND PASSIVE VOICE I think Carlton intended this for the list.>From: Clwinbery at aol.com>Date: Mon, 5 Nov 2001 21:43:50 EST>Subject: Re: [] Re: In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant>To: cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> >In a message dated 11/5/01 2:47:10 PM Central Standard Time,>cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu writes:> >> At 7:24 PM +0100 11/5/01, C.A. (Kees) Langeveld wrote:>> >The frequent use of masculine nouns such as hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi,>ALLWi,>> >DIERMHNEUTHS etc. in 1 Cor. 14:26-33, which deals with speaking in the>> >churchmeetings, together with the fact that in vers 34-35 women are said>to>> >refrain from speaking in the churchmeetings, provide a valid argument for>> >the thesis that in 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant or thought of. In other>> >words, 1 Cor 14:34-35 provides a reason for taking those nouns as>> >non-generic, that is, as referring to men only.>> >Carl W. Conrad has given me his opinion on this matter. I would like to>> hear>> >other optinions and arguments.>> >> I too welcome alternative opinions and arguments (so long as they stick to>> what the Greek text is saying), but lest there be any question of what I>> responded, here it is:>> >> At 2:03 PM -0500 11/3/01, Carl W. Conrad wrote:>> > … I would say>> >that all of these masculine pronouns (hEKASTOS, hEIS, hEAUTWi, ALLWi) and>> >even the noun DIERMHNEUTHS are generic–there is no reason to suppose that>> >any one of them can only refer to a male person.>>>It seems very difficult for English students (especially American) to get a>feel for the Greek use of gender. If any pronoun, adjective, participle, etc.>might include a man, they used the masculine. The masculine gender by itself>in such words does not rule out women unless the context makes it clear that>only men were referred to. I see nothing in the context of this passage that>rules out women, certainly not vss. 34-35. So, the feminine form of such>words generally ruled out men but the masculine does not rule out women.> >Carlton Winbery>Louisiana College>

 

ENDUW/ENDUOMAIMIDDLE AND PASSIVE VOICE

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Tue Nov 6 08:27:24 EST 2001

 

MIDDLE AND PASSIVE VOICE forground & background, boundry markers-Longacre’sModel Another reply evidently meant for the list rather than for me.>From: “Ted Mann” <theomann at earthlink.net>>To: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>>Subject: Re: [] Re: In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant>Date: Tue, 6 Nov 2001 06:57:22 -0500> >Carlton Winbery wrote:>> >It seems very difficult for English students (especially American) to get>a>> >feel for the Greek use of gender. If any pronoun, adjective, participle,>etc.>> >might include a man, they used the masculine. The masculine gender by>itself>> >in such words does not rule out women unless the context makes it clear>that>> >only men were referred to. I see nothing in the context of this passage>that>> >rules out women, certainly not vss. 34-35. So, the feminine form of such>> >words generally ruled out men but the masculine does not rule out women.>> >>> >Carlton Winbery>> >Louisiana College> >It seems to me the context of 1 Cor:14:34,35 may in fact rule out women in>vs. 26-33. It reads to me as though Paul is contrasting the roles of men>and women in the church. That is, when the church assembles, the men bring>psalms, teachings, etc., the (male) prophets speak, etc., but women, by>contrast (v.34), are to remain silent. Verse 37 then returns to the role of>men.> >Ted>Dr. Theodore H. Mann>theomann at earthlink.net

 

MIDDLE AND PASSIVE VOICEforground & background, boundry markers-Longacre’sModel

In 1 Cor 14:26-33 men are meant Mike Sangrey msangrey at BlueFeltHat.org
Tue Nov 6 12:51:02 EST 2001

 

KURIW/KAIROS – Rom 12:11 Topic Prominence Marking: Jn 19b-27 On Tue, 2001-11-06 at 08:27, Dr. Theodore H. Mann wrote:> >> >It seems to me the context of 1 Cor:14:34,35 may in fact rule out women in> >vs. 26-33. It reads to me as though Paul is contrasting the roles of men> >and women in the church. That is, when the church assembles, the men bring> >psalms, teachings, etc., the (male) prophets speak, etc., but women, by> >contrast (v.34), are to remain silent. Verse 37 then returns to the role of> >men.> >FWIW: In everyone’s mix of explanations which must be offered in orderto fit this whole text together and thus form a cohesive argument, onemust explain the strong flip in emotion from 14:35 to 36. To me, vs 36reads like a strong reaction against a statement made by theCorinthians. If I assume Paul is saying, “in your meetings, men shoulddo this, women should do that,” I’m left with the feeling that 36 comesout of nowhere. To get the effect read 26-35 in a calm voice out loudand then, with an angry voice, read 36-38. Notice how it just doesn’tflow. And also note that the emotion really is there (at least I thinkit is) in the text itself.To that end, I currently take 33b-35 as a quote from the letter fromCorinth to Paul. Paul reacts to that statement in 36-38. And this isconsistent with taking the masculines in 26-33a as generic as CarltonWinbery suggests.There’s many issues here. I am only seeking to help people make aninformed evaluation though my information may be wrong. YMMV (YourMileage May Vary).– Mike Sangreymsangrey at BlueFeltHat.orgLandisburg, Pa. “The first one last wins.” “A net of highly cohesive details reveals the truth.”

 

KURIW/KAIROS – Rom 12:11Topic Prominence Marking: Jn 19b-27

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6 thoughts on “1 Corinthians 14:26

  1. Link Hudson Link Hudson says:

    When ir comes to women prophesying, Paul mentions that in I Corinthians 11. Acts mentions it–your sons and daughters shall propesy: Philip’s daughters prophesied.

    Paul seems to indicate the commandments of the Lord were in line with the practice of the Jerusalem church–what came the word out from among you or unto you only has it come. The Jerusalrem church allowed members of the congregation to speak and had prophets.

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