1 Peter 1:11

[bible passage=”1 Peter 1:11″]

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4 thoughts on “1 Peter 1:11

  1. N.E. Barry Hofstetter says:

    Hey, Jordan, excellent attention to detail here. The articular constructions are what the textbooks call the attributive position of the article. In this case, they show that the phrasing within the articular construction specifically modifies the articular phrase, rather than making some sort of assertion. In this case, “the toward you grace” and “the among them Spirit of Christ…” Now, that’s awkward in English, so we have to render something like “the grace belonging to them” or “the Spirit of Christ among them” for idiomatic English — see your standard translations for how they handle it.

    N.E. Barry Hofstetter, semper melius Latine sonat… Classics& Bible Instructor @ The American Academy 2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner http://theamericanacademy.net http://theamericanacademy.net/ V-P, Academic Affairs, The North American Reformed Seminary http://www.tnars.net/

  2. Iver Larsen says:

    English also use prepositional phrases as constituents in a noun phrase, e.g.
    The book on the table. If it helps you may think of it as similar to a relative
    clause that is also a constituent of a noun phrase, e.g. The book (which is/was)
    on the table.

    The difference is that Greek uses fronting of a constituent to add relative
    prominence to it (often contrastive). So, instead of saying TO PNEUMA CRISTOU EN
    AUTOIS (the Spirit of Christ in them), Peter says: TO EN AUTOIS PNEUMA CRISTOU
    (the in them Spirit of Christ). The fronting puts the spotlight on these
    prophets who – in contrast to many other people – had the Spirit of Christ in
    them to show them something about the future (DHLOW).

    Likewise PERI THS EIS hUMAS CARITOS puts a stronger, contrastive spotlight on
    YOU – as opposed to them – who has experienced this new grace if Christ.

    Iver Larsen

  3. N.E. Barry Hofstetter says:

    Hey, Jordan, excellent attention to detail here. The articular constructions are what the textbooks call the attributive position of the article. In this case, they show that the phrasing within the articular construction specifically modifies the articular phrase, rather than making some sort of assertion. In this case, “the toward you grace” and “the among them Spirit of Christ…” Now, that’s awkward in English, so we have to render something like “the grace belonging to them” or “the Spirit of Christ among them” for idiomatic English — see your standard translations for how they handle it.

    N.E. Barry Hofstetter, semper melius Latine sonat… Classics& Bible Instructor @ The American Academy 2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner http://theamericanacademy.net http://theamericanacademy.net/ V-P, Academic Affairs, The North American Reformed Seminary http://www.tnars.net/

  4. Iver Larsen says:

    English also use prepositional phrases as constituents in a noun phrase, e.g.
    The book on the table. If it helps you may think of it as similar to a relative
    clause that is also a constituent of a noun phrase, e.g. The book (which is/was)
    on the table.

    The difference is that Greek uses fronting of a constituent to add relative
    prominence to it (often contrastive). So, instead of saying TO PNEUMA CRISTOU EN
    AUTOIS (the Spirit of Christ in them), Peter says: TO EN AUTOIS PNEUMA CRISTOU
    (the in them Spirit of Christ). The fronting puts the spotlight on these
    prophets who – in contrast to many other people – had the Spirit of Christ in
    them to show them something about the future (DHLOW).

    Likewise PERI THS EIS hUMAS CARITOS puts a stronger, contrastive spotlight on
    YOU – as opposed to them – who has experienced this new grace if Christ.

    Iver Larsen

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