Acts 16:25

Acts 16:25 L.Ouzky at atlas.cz L.Ouzky at atlas.cz
Sat May 18 13:02:37 EDT 2002

Books for Beginners Apology PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI HUMNOUN TON QEONDoes it mean they sung unto God or about God?Thanks, Lubos Ouzky

Books for BeginnersApology

Acts 16:25 Wayne Leman wayne_leman at sil.org
Sat May 18 14:40:27 EDT 2002

Apology Titus 2:12 Explicative OUDE Since the object TON QEON is in the accusative case, rather than thegenitive, I would think that they were singing to God.Wayne—–Wayne LemanBible Translation discussion list:http://biblepacesetter.org/bibletranslation/index.html> PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI HUMNOUN TON QEON> > Does it mean they sung unto God or about God?> Thanks,> Lubos Ouzky

ApologyTitus 2:12 Explicative OUDE

Acts 16:25 Vincent M. Setterholm Vincents at minn.net
Sat May 18 15:37:57 EDT 2002

Titus 2:12 Explicative OUDE Acts 16:25 Heb 2:12 also has HUMNEW with an accusative (the only other transitiveinstance in the NT, I think). I found it interesting that in both the NIVand NASB the accusative there is rendered along the lines of ‘about’ ratherthan ‘to’. “sing your praises” rather than “sing praises to you”. (and yetboth of those translations render the same construction as ‘to’ in Acts 16.)In speach verbs like LEGW, if you wanted to speak ‘to God’ you would usedative, rather than accusative, and if you wanted to speak ‘about God’ youwould use accusative (or PERI+Genitive, but never genitive alone). Anexample of this is is John 8:27. Jesus speaks to them (dative) about thefather (accusative).So if humnew functions like legw, then a good argument could be made for’about’ (as it is translated in Heb 2:12), but if HUMNEW allways takes anaccusative as its indirect object (as BAGD describes) then ‘to’ is correct,and the above translations made some error in Heb 2:12.Vincent Setterholm—–Original Message—–From: Wayne Leman [mailto:wayne_leman at sil.org]Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2002 1:40 PMTo: Biblical GreekSubject: [] Acts 16:25Since the object TON QEON is in the accusative case, rather than thegenitive, I would think that they were singing to God.Wayne—–Wayne LemanBible Translation discussion list:http://biblepacesetter.org/bibletranslation/index.html> PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI HUMNOUN TON QEON> > Does it mean they sung unto God or about God?> Thanks,> Lubos Ouzky— home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/You are currently subscribed to as: [Vincents at minn.net]To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu

Titus 2:12 Explicative OUDEActs 16:25

Acts 16:25 c stirling bartholomew cc.constantine at worldnet.att.net
Sat May 18 16:07:05 EDT 2002

Acts 16:25 Acts 16:25 on 5/18/02 12:37 PM, Vincent M. Setterholm wrote:> In speach verbs like LEGW, if you wanted to speak ‘to God’ you would use> dative, rather than accusativeVincent,I think Wayne may be right on this one. See the use of KURION as a renderingof the MT: lYHWH. The prefixed “l” would cause one to expect a dative in theLXX but not in these examples.IS. 12:4 KAI EREIS EN THi hHMERAi EKEINHi hUMNEITE KURION BOATE TO ONOMAAUTOU ANAGGEILATE EN TOIS EQNESIN TA ENDOXA AUTOU MIMNHiSKESQE hOTI hUYWQHTO ONOMA AUTOU 2CHR. 29:30 KAI EIPEN EZEKIAS hO BASILEUS KAI hOI ARCONTES TOIS LEUITAIShUMNEIN TON KURION EN LOGOIS DAUID KAI ASAF TOU PROFHTOU KAI hUMNOUN ENEUFROSUNHi KAI EPESON KAI PROSEKUNHSANClay– Clayton Stirling BartholomewThree Tree PointP.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062

Acts 16:25Acts 16:25

Acts 16:25 Vincent M. Setterholm Vincents at minn.net
Sat May 18 16:38:26 EDT 2002

Acts 16:25 Acts 16:25 Right, and that is certainly in line with what Bauer says about the word.Can anyone think of a good reason why hUMNEW is not handled this way in Heb2:12 (NIV or NASB)? (Understanding that this isn’t a forum for critiquingEnglish translations, just wondering if anyone sees anything in the Greekthat I am missing that could support those readings.) I am just starting tolearn Hebrew, but when I look at Psalm 22:23, where Hebrews 2:12 seems to bequoting, the second person singular masculine suffix on halel seems toindicate ‘to’ here as well.Vincent Setterholm—–Original Message—–From: c stirling bartholomew [mailto:cc.constantine at worldnet.att.net]Sent: Saturday, May 18, 2002 3:07 PMTo: Biblical GreekSubject: [] RE: Acts 16:25on 5/18/02 12:37 PM, Vincent M. Setterholm wrote:> In speach verbs like LEGW, if you wanted to speak ‘to God’ you would use> dative, rather than accusativeVincent,I think Wayne may be right on this one. See the use of KURION as a renderingof the MT: lYHWH. The prefixed “l” would cause one to expect a dative in theLXX but not in these examples.IS. 12:4 KAI EREIS EN THi hHMERAi EKEINHi hUMNEITE KURION BOATE TO ONOMAAUTOU ANAGGEILATE EN TOIS EQNESIN TA ENDOXA AUTOU MIMNHiSKESQE hOTI hUYWQHTO ONOMA AUTOU2CHR. 29:30 KAI EIPEN EZEKIAS hO BASILEUS KAI hOI ARCONTES TOIS LEUITAIShUMNEIN TON KURION EN LOGOIS DAUID KAI ASAF TOU PROFHTOU KAI hUMNOUN ENEUFROSUNHi KAI EPESON KAI PROSEKUNHSANClay–Clayton Stirling BartholomewThree Tree PointP.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062— home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/You are currently subscribed to as: [Vincents at minn.net]To unsubscribe, forward this message to$subst(‘Email.Unsub’)To subscribe, send a message to subscribe- at franklin.oit.unc.edu

Acts 16:25Acts 16:25

Acts 16:25 Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Sat May 18 17:50:45 EDT 2002

Acts 16:25 Titus 2:12 Explicative OUDE At 3:38 PM -0500 5/18/02, Vincent M. Setterholm wrote:>Right, and that is certainly in line with what Bauer says about the word.>Can anyone think of a good reason why hUMNEW is not handled this way in Heb>2:12 (NIV or NASB)? (Understanding that this isn’t a forum for critiquing>English translations, just wondering if anyone sees anything in the Greek>that I am missing that could support those readings.) I am just starting to>learn Hebrew, but when I look at Psalm 22:23, where Hebrews 2:12 seems to be>quoting, the second person singular masculine suffix on halel seems to>indicate ‘to’ here as well.Heb 2:12 in GNT reads LEGWN APAGGELW TO ONOMA SOU TOIS ADELFOIS MOU, ENMESWi EKKLHSIAS hUMNHSW SE. and it mirrors exactly Ps 21:23 in LXX. TheGreek usage is consistent. MT there reads HaLLaLKha, consistent with theGreek accusative SE. How the versions put that into idiomatic English isanother matter altogether.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)Most months:: 1647 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu OR cwconrad at ioa.comWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

Acts 16:25Titus 2:12 Explicative OUDE

Acts 16:25 Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Mon May 20 08:30:19 EDT 2002

The opening of 1 Peter infinitive -> finite verb > Heb 2:12 also has HUMNEW with an accusative (the only other transitive> instance in the NT, I think). I found it interesting that in both the NIV> and NASB the accusative there is rendered along the lines of> ‘about’ rather> than ‘to’. “sing your praises” rather than “sing praises to> you”. (and yet> both of those translations render the same construction as ‘to’> in Acts 16.)Both seem to have the same meaning, namely, “I will praise you in song.” Inboth cases the content of the song would be “about God”, but in both casespeople were listening, so in a sense they were also singing to the peoplewho were present, as well as to God and about God.Iver Larsen

The opening of 1 Peterinfinitive -> finite verb

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Craig Johnson newsgroupstuff at gmail.com
Sun May 14 17:28:35 EDT 2006

[] I Cor. 14:5 LALEIN alone or in context [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? In Acts 16:25, it says:PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI hUMNOUN TON QEONI would have thought that with the combination of participle and mainverb this would be best translated something like this:”When Paul and Silas were praying, they sang hymns to God”However, all translations I’ve found seem to separate the praying andsinging, rather than make the singing related to the praying. Whywould that be? It seems to lose the meaning of the participle, or am Iover-emphasising the meaning of the participle?Here are sample translations:(ASV) But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singinghymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;(ESV) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns toGod, and the prisoners were listening to them,(GB) Nowe at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sung Psalmes vntoGod: and the prisoners heard them.(KJV) And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises untoGod: and the prisoners heard them.(LITV) And having prayed, toward midnight Paul and Silas praised Godin a hymn. And the prisoners listened to them. [Here Green even makespraying prior to singing!](MKJV) And toward midnight Paul and Silas prayed and praised God in ahymn. And the prisoners listened to them.(NET) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying98 and singing hymnsto God, and the rest of the prisoners were listening to them. [Note:Grk “praying, were singing.” The participle προσευχόμενοι(proseucomenoi) has been translated as a finite verb due torequirements of contemporary English style.](Vulgate) media autem nocte Paulus et Silas adorantes laudabant Deumet audiebant eos qui in custodia erant [Here keeps participle but usesadorantes instead of orantes!](F F Bruce) At midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymnsto God, and the prisoners were listening to them.–Craig JohnsonBrisbane, AustraliaBlog Experiment: http://bloggledegook.blogspot.com/

[] I Cor. 14:5 LALEIN alone or in context[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Eddie Mishoe edmishoe at yahoo.com
Sun May 14 18:07:12 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Craig:There is more than one way to understand this verse,and your translation is indeed one of them. Over aperiod of time, they were likely praying some andsinging some. We tend to think of prayer as a formalundertaking, where all eyes are to be closed, someoneis praying, and then an Amen ends that prayer (whichmay even here be the case). Prayers can just as easilybe informally spoken, as if the one praying were inactual conversation with the Lord. You can envision them praying some, singing some,praying some more, singing some more, etc. See 1 Cor14 for some help in who/when/how one might pray. Noteparticularly the juxtaposition of prayer/singing: 14:15 What should I do? I will pray with my spirit,but I will also pray with my mind. I will sing praiseswith my spirit, but I will also sing praises with mymind. Eddie MishoePastor__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Jeffrey T. Requadt jeffreyrequadt_list at hotmail.com
Sun May 14 18:57:41 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? I would venture a guess that this is an example of the attendant circumstance participle, which is why all those translations used two finite verbs in English connected by “and.”Unfortunately, I don’t have Wallace on my computer, or I would copy and paste into this email. I do have ATR on Logos, but I can’t seem to find a good discussion of the attendant circumstance participle (or of this passage). If someone does have Wallace, you can look it up on pages 640-645. I’ll try to summarize his discussion here with some brief quotes:”The attendant circumstance participle is used to communicate an action that, in some sense, is coordinate with the finite verb. In this respect it is not dependent, for it is translated like a verb. Yet it is still dependent *semantically*, because it cannot exist without the main verb. It is translated as a finite verb connected to the main verb by *and*. The participle then, in effect, “piggy-backs” on the mood of the main verb. This usage is relatively common, but widely misunderstood.” (640)He gives the following structural guidelines (not hard-and-fast rules, but true about 90% of the time):1. The tense of the participle is usually *aorist*.2. The tense of the main verb is usually *aorist*. [Note: The historical present, however, does occur from time to time.]3. The mood of the main verb is usually *imperative* or *indicative*.4. The participle will *precede the main verb*–both in word order and time of event (though usually there is a very close proximity).5. Attendant circumstance participles occur frequently in narrative literature, infrequently elsewhere.Looking at Acts 16:25, the participle, PROSEUCOMENOI is a present deponent, which would seem to argue against it being attendant circumstance. However, I believe this is becase the main verb, hUMNOUN, is in the imperfect tense, and so it’s not surprising that the participle is in the present tense. In fact, if the participle was aorist with an imperfect main verb, that’s when I would probably understand it as temporal: “After praying, they sang…”.So I’m guessing that this really is an attendant circumstance participle rather than a participle of time or of manner.Jeffrey T. RequadtTucson, AZ—– Original Message —– From: “Craig Johnson” <newsgroupstuff at gmail.com>To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2006 2:28 PMSubject: [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?> In Acts 16:25, it says:> > PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI hUMNOUN TON QEON> > I would have thought that with the combination of participle and main> verb this would be best translated something like this:> > “When Paul and Silas were praying, they sang hymns to God”> > However, all translations I’ve found seem to separate the praying and> singing, rather than make the singing related to the praying. Why> would that be? It seems to lose the meaning of the participle, or am I> over-emphasising the meaning of the participle?> > > > Here are sample translations:> > (ASV) But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing> hymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;> > (ESV) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to> God, and the prisoners were listening to them,> > (GB) Nowe at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sung Psalmes vnto> God: and the prisoners heard them.> > (KJV) And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto> God: and the prisoners heard them.> > (LITV) And having prayed, toward midnight Paul and Silas praised God> in a hymn. And the prisoners listened to them. [Here Green even makes> praying prior to singing!]> > (MKJV) And toward midnight Paul and Silas prayed and praised God in a> hymn. And the prisoners listened to them.> > (NET) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying98 and singing hymns> to God, and the rest of the prisoners were listening to them. [Note:> Grk “praying, were singing.” The participle προσευχόμενοι> (proseucomenoi) has been translated as a finite verb due to> requirements of contemporary English style.]> > (Vulgate) media autem nocte Paulus et Silas adorantes laudabant Deum> et audiebant eos qui in custodia erant [Here keeps participle but uses> adorantes instead of orantes!]> > (F F Bruce) At midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns> to God, and the prisoners were listening to them.> >> Craig Johnson> Brisbane, Australia> Blog Experiment: http://bloggledegook.blogspot.com/>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Sun May 14 20:14:25 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? On May 14, 2006, at 5:28 PM, Craig Johnson wrote:> In Acts 16:25, it says:> > PAULOS KAI SILAS PROSEUCOMENOI hUMNOUN TON QEON> > I would have thought that with the combination of participle and main> verb this would be best translated something like this:> > “When Paul and Silas were praying, they sang hymns to God”> > However, all translations I’ve found seem to separate the praying and> singing, rather than make the singing related to the praying. Why> would that be? It seems to lose the meaning of the participle, or am I> over-emphasising the meaning of the participle?This is really nothing more than a matter of a Greek stylistic preference for subordination (hypotaxis) and an English preference for coordination (parataxis). All of the versions that you cite below are accurate English versions of the Greek text which you cited above. Your own version above (“When Paul and Silas were praying, they sang hymns to God”) accurately conveys the content of the Greek but is not the “natural” idiomatic English way of expressing that content. One of the things that tends to surprise students of ancient Greek is the extent to which Greek subordinates elements that are commonly set forth in English as parallel to each other.> Here are sample translations:> > (ASV) But about midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing> hymns unto God, and the prisoners were listening to them;> > (ESV) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns to> God, and the prisoners were listening to them,> > (GB) Nowe at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sung Psalmes vnto> God: and the prisoners heard them.> > (KJV) And at midnight Paul and Silas prayed, and sang praises unto> God: and the prisoners heard them.> > (LITV) And having prayed, toward midnight Paul and Silas praised God> in a hymn. And the prisoners listened to them. [Here Green even makes> praying prior to singing!]> > (MKJV) And toward midnight Paul and Silas prayed and praised God in a> hymn. And the prisoners listened to them.> > (NET) About midnight Paul and Silas were praying98 and singing hymns> to God, and the rest of the prisoners were listening to them. [Note:> Grk “praying, were singing.” The participle προσευχόμενοι> (proseucomenoi) has been translated as a finite verb due to> requirements of contemporary English style.]> > (Vulgate) media autem nocte Paulus et Silas adorantes laudabant Deum> et audiebant eos qui in custodia erant [Here keeps participle but uses> adorantes instead of orantes!]> > (F F Bruce) At midnight Paul and Silas were praying and singing hymns> to God, and the prisoners were listening to them.> >> Craig Johnson> Brisbane, Australia> Blog Experiment: http://bloggledegook.blogspot.com/>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Retired)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad2 at mac.comWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Craig Johnson newsgroupstuff at gmail.com
Mon May 15 01:17:37 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? > This is really nothing more than a matter of a Greek stylistic> preference for subordination (hypotaxis) and an English preference> for coordination (parataxis). All of the versions that you cite below> are accurate English versions of the Greek text which you cited> above. Your own version above (“When Paul and Silas were praying,> they sang hymns to God”) accurately conveys the content of the Greek> but is not the “natural” idiomatic English way of expressing that> content. One of the things that tends to surprise students of ancient> Greek is the extent to which Greek subordinates elements that are> commonly set forth in English as parallel to each other.Okay, so if I understand you correctly, are you saying that Greek usessubordination, but really it means coordination?In other words, given the following options, which are allowed by the Greek:A. Two separate activities (praying and singing) were occuring at the same time.B. Singing is actually a part of or included in the prayingI think you are saying it is just the Greek way of saying A, but I wasincorrectly assuming it must mean B. Is that right?Thanks–Craig JohnsonBrisbane, Australia.

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Mon May 15 06:57:13 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? On May 15, 2006, at 1:17 AM, Craig Johnson wrote:>> This is really nothing more than a matter of a Greek stylistic>> preference for subordination (hypotaxis) and an English preference>> for coordination (parataxis). All of the versions that you cite below>> are accurate English versions of the Greek text which you cited>> above. Your own version above (“When Paul and Silas were praying,>> they sang hymns to God”) accurately conveys the content of the Greek>> but is not the “natural” idiomatic English way of expressing that>> content. One of the things that tends to surprise students of ancient>> Greek is the extent to which Greek subordinates elements that are>> commonly set forth in English as parallel to each other.> > Okay, so if I understand you correctly, are you saying that Greek uses> subordination, but really it means coordination?> > In other words, given the following options, which are allowed by > the Greek:> > A. Two separate activities (praying and singing) were occuring at > the same time.> B. Singing is actually a part of or included in the praying> > I think you are saying it is just the Greek way of saying A, but I was> incorrectly assuming it must mean B. Is that right?“A” is a better statement, at any rate. My real point is that ancient Greek and modern English have distinct idiomatic ways of formulating the relationships of time (priority, contemporaneity, posteriority) and circumstantiality (causality, concession, contingency, etc.). Even where verbal actions are contemporaneous and not causally or temporally linked to each other, Greek tends to use a single primary verb and subordinate one or more contemporaneous verbal actions or states. For example, English “The adults dined together and talked about current events ” is likely to be formulated in ancient Greek as “The adults dined together, talking about current events.” If one or more actions should be temporally prior to another, ancient Greek tends to put the prior actions into an aorist participle, e.g., “The adults discussed current events and then dined together” becomes hOI TELEIOI TA TOTE DIALALHSANTES SUNANEKEINTO.Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Retired)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad2 at mac.comWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Craig Johnson newsgroupstuff at gmail.com
Mon May 15 13:24:44 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? So under the Wallace scheme, what kind of participle would youclassify PROSEUCOMENOI as? Is there more than one valid possibilityfor how to read it?Thanks!–Craig JohnsonBrisbane, AustraliaBlog Experiment: http://bloggledegook.blogspot.com/On 5/15/06, Carl W. Conrad <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> wrote:> “A” is a better statement, at any rate. My real point is that ancient> Greek and modern English have distinct idiomatic ways of formulating> the relationships of time (priority, contemporaneity, posteriority)> and circumstantiality (causality, concession, contingency, etc.).> Even where verbal actions are contemporaneous and not causally or> temporally linked to each other, Greek tends to use a single primary> verb and subordinate one or more contemporaneous verbal actions or> states. For example, English “The adults dined together and talked> about current events ” is likely to be formulated in ancient Greek as> “The adults dined together, talking about current events.” If one or> more actions should be temporally prior to another, ancient Greek> tends to put the prior actions into an aorist participle, e.g., “The> adults discussed current events and then dined together” becomes hOI> TELEIOI TA TOTE DIALALHSANTES SUNANEKEINTO.> > > Carl W. Conrad> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243> cwconrad2 at mac.com> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Mon May 15 14:07:34 EDT 2006

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing? [] Could someone help me with this very short sentence? Probably simply temporal: “As they prayed, the sang hymns …”On May 15, 2006, at 1:24 PM, Craig Johnson wrote:> So under the Wallace scheme, what kind of participle would you> classify PROSEUCOMENOI as? Is there more than one valid possibility> for how to read it?> > Thanks!> >> Craig Johnson> Brisbane, Australia> Blog Experiment: http://bloggledegook.blogspot.com/> > > On 5/15/06, Carl W. Conrad <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> wrote:>> “A” is a better statement, at any rate. My real point is that ancient>> Greek and modern English have distinct idiomatic ways of formulating>> the relationships of time (priority, contemporaneity, posteriority)>> and circumstantiality (causality, concession, contingency, etc.).>> Even where verbal actions are contemporaneous and not causally or>> temporally linked to each other, Greek tends to use a single primary>> verb and subordinate one or more contemporaneous verbal actions or>> states. For example, English “The adults dined together and talked>> about current events ” is likely to be formulated in ancient Greek as>> “The adults dined together, talking about current events.” If one or>> more actions should be temporally prior to another, ancient Greek>> tends to put the prior actions into an aorist participle, e.g., “The>> adults discussed current events and then dined together” becomes hOI>> TELEIOI TA TOTE DIALALHSANTES SUNANEKEINTO.>> >> >> Carl W. Conrad>> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)>> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243>> cwconrad2 at mac.com>> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Retired)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad2 at mac.comWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] Acts 16:25 praying and singing?[] Could someone help me with this very short sentence?

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