Acts 26:14

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek James Jackson jajackso at excite.com
Wed Sep 17 16:11:05 EDT 2003

WARNING: [] petros/ptr homonym to petros/keph [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Mel Gibson has made a film (scheduled for release ca. Easter 2004) called “The Passion”. He stated that he wanted it to be historically accurate and therefore the characters will only speak Aramaic and Latin. With the understanding that this is a Hollywood production I’m curious as to why there would be no Koine Greek spoken in this movie. Would the Roman-educated prefect Pilate have known the Greek language or Hebrew or Aramaic? How did he interact with the Jewish religious leaders? Perhaps through a translator?In Matthew 27:46 the GNT seems to have a Greek transliteration of the Aramaic words that Jesus spoke from the cross: HLI HLI LEMA SABACQANI. In Acts 26:14 it states that Jesus spoke to Saul in the Hebrew language. It seems the New Testament makes a special mention of the times when the Greek language was not spoken.So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spoken Greek to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken between those of different nationalities during that time.I was hoping to hear some Koine Greek spoken in this movie but it does not seem that it will happen.James Jackson_______________________________________________Join Excite! – http://www.excite.comThe most personalized portal on the Web!

WARNING: [] petros/ptr homonym to petros/keph[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek James Jackson jajackso at excite.com
Wed Sep 17 16:11:05 EDT 2003

WARNING: [] petros/ptr homonym to petros/keph [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Mel Gibson has made a film (scheduled for release ca. Easter 2004) called “The Passion”. He stated that he wanted it to be historically accurate and therefore the characters will only speak Aramaic and Latin. With the understanding that this is a Hollywood production I’m curious as to why there would be no Koine Greek spoken in this movie. Would the Roman-educated prefect Pilate have known the Greek language or Hebrew or Aramaic? How did he interact with the Jewish religious leaders? Perhaps through a translator?In Matthew 27:46 the GNT seems to have a Greek transliteration of the Aramaic words that Jesus spoke from the cross: HLI HLI LEMA SABACQANI. In Acts 26:14 it states that Jesus spoke to Saul in the Hebrew language. It seems the New Testament makes a special mention of the times when the Greek language was not spoken.So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spoken Greek to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken between those of different nationalities during that time.I was hoping to hear some Koine Greek spoken in this movie but it does not seem that it will happen.James Jackson_______________________________________________Join Excite! – http://www.excite.comThe most personalized portal on the Web!

WARNING: [] petros/ptr homonym to petros/keph[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Kevin W. Woodruff cierpke at prodigy.net
Wed Sep 17 16:37:17 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek James:Koine Greek is now a “dead language” whereas Latin andAramaic (or more correctly Syriac) are still beingspoken. I’m sure that had something to do with it. Kevin — James Jackson <jajackso at excite.com> wrote:> > Mel Gibson has made a film (scheduled for release> ca. Easter 2004) called “The Passion”. He stated> that he wanted it to be historically accurate and> therefore the characters will only speak Aramaic and> Latin. With the understanding that this is a> Hollywood production I’m curious as to why there> would be no Koine Greek spoken in this movie. Would> the Roman-educated prefect Pilate have known the> Greek language or Hebrew or Aramaic? How did he> interact with the Jewish religious leaders? Perhaps> through a translator?> In Matthew 27:46 the GNT seems to have a Greek> transliteration of the Aramaic words that Jesus> spoke from the cross: HLI HLI LEMA SABACQANI. In> Acts 26:14 it states that Jesus spoke to Saul in the> Hebrew language. It seems the New Testament makes a> special mention of the times when the Greek language> was not spoken.> So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a> prevalent language spoken in Israel during the first> century? I realize that there were many Hellenistic> Jews living in Israel at that time and would have> spoken Greek to each other. However I am not sure> what language would have been spoken between those> of different nationalities during that time.> I was hoping to hear some Koine Greek spoken in this> movie but it does not seem that it will happen.> James Jackson> > _______________________________________________> Join Excite! – http://www.excite.com> The most personalized portal on the Web!>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/=====Prof. Kevin W. Woodruff, M. Div., M. S. I. S.Library Director/Reference Librarian, Professor of Bible and GreekTennessee Temple University/Temple Baptist Seminary, 1815 Union Ave. Chattanooga, Tennessee 37404, United States of America423/493-4252 (office) 423/493-4423 (home) 423/493-4497 (FAX)Cierpke at prodigy.net http://pages.prodigy.net/cierpke/woodruff.htm

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Kevin W. Woodruff cierpke at prodigy.net
Wed Sep 17 16:37:17 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek James:Koine Greek is now a “dead language” whereas Latin andAramaic (or more correctly Syriac) are still beingspoken. I’m sure that had something to do with it. Kevin — James Jackson <jajackso at excite.com> wrote:> > Mel Gibson has made a film (scheduled for release> ca. Easter 2004) called “The Passion”. He stated> that he wanted it to be historically accurate and> therefore the characters will only speak Aramaic and> Latin. With the understanding that this is a> Hollywood production I’m curious as to why there> would be no Koine Greek spoken in this movie. Would> the Roman-educated prefect Pilate have known the> Greek language or Hebrew or Aramaic? How did he> interact with the Jewish religious leaders? Perhaps> through a translator?> In Matthew 27:46 the GNT seems to have a Greek> transliteration of the Aramaic words that Jesus> spoke from the cross: HLI HLI LEMA SABACQANI. In> Acts 26:14 it states that Jesus spoke to Saul in the> Hebrew language. It seems the New Testament makes a> special mention of the times when the Greek language> was not spoken.> So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a> prevalent language spoken in Israel during the first> century? I realize that there were many Hellenistic> Jews living in Israel at that time and would have> spoken Greek to each other. However I am not sure> what language would have been spoken between those> of different nationalities during that time.> I was hoping to hear some Koine Greek spoken in this> movie but it does not seem that it will happen.> James Jackson> > _______________________________________________> Join Excite! – http://www.excite.com> The most personalized portal on the Web!>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/=====Prof. Kevin W. Woodruff, M. Div., M. S. I. S.Library Director/Reference Librarian, Professor of Bible and GreekTennessee Temple University/Temple Baptist Seminary, 1815 Union Ave. Chattanooga, Tennessee 37404, United States of America423/493-4252 (office) 423/493-4423 (home) 423/493-4497 (FAX)Cierpke at prodigy.net http://pages.prodigy.net/cierpke/woodruff.htm

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Wed Sep 17 17:06:43 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in>Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many>Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spoken Greek>to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken>between those of different nationalities during that time.There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine Greek WASspoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-centuryPalestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestiniancommunities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of the Seaof Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; Ipersonally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is aquestion open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others (myselfincluded) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however, thisis a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , where weneed to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself and toGreek biblical texts.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Wed Sep 17 17:06:43 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in>Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many>Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spoken Greek>to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken>between those of different nationalities during that time.There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine Greek WASspoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-centuryPalestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestiniancommunities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of the Seaof Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; Ipersonally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is aquestion open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others (myselfincluded) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however, thisis a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , where weneed to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself and toGreek biblical texts.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek and Multilingualism ofJesus Larry Baker lbaker at accs.edu
Thu Sep 18 17:23:14 EDT 2003

[] OFF TOPIC: Avoiding viruses and SPAM [] IWTA — long or short? At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spokenin>Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many>Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spokenGreek>to each other. However I am not sure what language would have beenspoken>between those of different nationalities during that time.There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine GreekWASspoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-centuryPalestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestiniancommunities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of theSeaof Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; Ipersonally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is aquestion open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others(myselfincluded) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however,thisis a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , whereweneed to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself andtoGreek biblical texts.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/The multilingualism of Jesus and the Apostles (incl. Paul) may seem onthe one hand a bit afield but on the other hand is an important reasonfor the interesting linguistic deals discussed in items! Ourdetailed interest in Biblical Koine Greek with its linguistics andgrammar is with a belief in the earliest, extant texts of the NT beingin this form of Greek, even with some issues of language of inspiration.Then comes the query of this text, as to its being a direct record ofJesus’ words, as say with Paul, or a translation of these words of Jesus(cf. LXX).The GNT, as it appears, seems to quote Jesus in Greek with veryappropriate excursions into Aramaic, especially in Mark, as he went intothat language. Many people may find tri-lingualism odd or unusually insome cultures, even of first century AD Israel, but it is interesting tosee how a good case can be built for Greek (along with Aramiac) beingthe language(s) of Jesus’ home, ministry, and original record of hiswords, be they Greek or Aramaic (with some understanding of the HebrewTanach). BAR has an interesting article about this in their July/Aug.,2003, issue.Larry N. Baker, prof. of biblical languagesAmerican Christian College and SeminaryOKC, OKlbaker at accs.edu www.accs.edu

[] OFF TOPIC: Avoiding viruses and SPAM[] IWTA — long or short?

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek and Multilingualism ofJesus Larry Baker lbaker at accs.edu
Thu Sep 18 17:23:14 EDT 2003

[] OFF TOPIC: Avoiding viruses and SPAM [] IWTA — long or short? At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spokenin>Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many>Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spokenGreek>to each other. However I am not sure what language would have beenspoken>between those of different nationalities during that time.There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine GreekWASspoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-centuryPalestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestiniancommunities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of theSeaof Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; Ipersonally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is aquestion open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others(myselfincluded) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however,thisis a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , whereweneed to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself andtoGreek biblical texts.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/The multilingualism of Jesus and the Apostles (incl. Paul) may seem onthe one hand a bit afield but on the other hand is an important reasonfor the interesting linguistic deals discussed in items! Ourdetailed interest in Biblical Koine Greek with its linguistics andgrammar is with a belief in the earliest, extant texts of the NT beingin this form of Greek, even with some issues of language of inspiration.Then comes the query of this text, as to its being a direct record ofJesus’ words, as say with Paul, or a translation of these words of Jesus(cf. LXX).The GNT, as it appears, seems to quote Jesus in Greek with veryappropriate excursions into Aramaic, especially in Mark, as he went intothat language. Many people may find tri-lingualism odd or unusually insome cultures, even of first century AD Israel, but it is interesting tosee how a good case can be built for Greek (along with Aramiac) beingthe language(s) of Jesus’ home, ministry, and original record of hiswords, be they Greek or Aramaic (with some understanding of the HebrewTanach). BAR has an interesting article about this in their July/Aug.,2003, issue.Larry N. Baker, prof. of biblical languagesAmerican Christian College and SeminaryOKC, OKlbaker at accs.edu www.accs.edu

[] OFF TOPIC: Avoiding viruses and SPAM[] IWTA — long or short?

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Kent & Lauren Clarke kentdclarke at hotmail.com
Thu Sep 18 21:09:41 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] Luke 12:4 PERISSOTERON TI Dear Colleagues:I would agree with Professor Conrad. For an interesting read that relates tothis issue, see S.E. Porter, “Did Jesus Ever Teach In Greek?”, TynBul 44/2(1993), pp. 199-235. He makes some very interesting points.Kind Regards;KentKent D. Clarke (Ph.D. Bristol)Department of Religious StudiesTrinity Western University7600 Glover RoadLangley, British ColumbiaCanada—– Original Message —–From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>To: <jajackso at excite.com>Cc: < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 2:06 PMSubject: Re: [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek> At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in> >Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many> >Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spokenGreek> >to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken> >between those of different nationalities during that time.> > There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine GreekWAS> spoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-century> Palestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestinian> communities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of theSea> of Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; I> personally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is a> question open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:> some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others (myself> included) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however, this> is a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , wherewe> need to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself and to> Greek biblical texts.>> > Carl W. Conrad> Department of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243> cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> —Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 – Release Date: 01/09/2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] Luke 12:4 PERISSOTERON TI

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek Kent & Lauren Clarke kentdclarke at hotmail.com
Thu Sep 18 21:09:41 EDT 2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek [] Luke 12:4 PERISSOTERON TI Dear Colleagues:I would agree with Professor Conrad. For an interesting read that relates tothis issue, see S.E. Porter, “Did Jesus Ever Teach In Greek?”, TynBul 44/2(1993), pp. 199-235. He makes some very interesting points.Kind Regards;KentKent D. Clarke (Ph.D. Bristol)Department of Religious StudiesTrinity Western University7600 Glover RoadLangley, British ColumbiaCanada—– Original Message —–From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>To: <jajackso at excite.com>Cc: < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Wednesday, September 17, 2003 2:06 PMSubject: Re: [] “The Passion” and Koine Greek> At 4:11 PM -0400 9/17/03, James Jackson wrote:> >> >So I guess my question is, was Koine Greek a prevalent language spoken in> >Israel during the first century? I realize that there were many> >Hellenistic Jews living in Israel at that time and would have spokenGreek> >to each other. However I am not sure what language would have been spoken> >between those of different nationalities during that time.> > There’s a good deal of speculation here. It is certain that Koine GreekWAS> spoken “between those of different nationalities” in first-century> Palestine, and it was surely the dominant language in some Palestinian> communities, especially in the so-called “Decapolis” to the east of theSea> of Galilee, and merchants and military people must have used Greek; I> personally think that a lot of Greek was spoken in Galilee. It is a> question open to dispute whether Jesus spoke or understood Greek at all:> some list-members seem to deem it extremely unlikely while others (myself> included) think it not at all unlikely that he did. In fact, however, this> is a question that really lies beyond the proper scope of , wherewe> need to keep the focus on matters pertaining to the language itself and to> Greek biblical texts.>> > Carl W. Conrad> Department of Classics, Washington University (Emeritus)> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243> cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> —Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).Version: 6.0.516 / Virus Database: 313 – Release Date: 01/09/2003

[] “The Passion” and Koine Greek[] Luke 12:4 PERISSOTERON TI

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