32 articles New Testament Page 2 / 2

Hebrews 11:1

Hebrews 11:11

[] Newbie / Lurker question on Hebrews 11:1 DE astransitional conjunction Kenneth Bent ken at cotr.com Wed Aug 25 11:24:59 EDT 2010   [] Inscriptions [] Newbie / Lurker question on Hebrews 11:1 DE as transitional conjunction Hebrews 11:1 εστιν δε πιστις ελπιζομενων υποστασις πραγματων ελεγχος ου βλεπομενων1 ESTIN DE PISTIS ELPIZOMENWN UPOSTASIS PRAGMATWN ELEGXOS…

Ephesians 2:8

Ephesians 2:8

Ephesians 2:8,9 Matthew R. Miller biblicalscribe at hotmail.com Wed Jun 6 14:29:48 EDT 2001   Phil 2:2, why TO AUTO accusative? Is Mk 14:62 a implied threat Hello all,th xariti in Ephesians 2:8 is in the dative case (feminine singular). Iunderstand the dative case to have the following main functions in koineGreek: 1) to indicate…

Philippians 2:16

Philippians 2:16

[bible passage=”Philippians 2:16″] Okay then, while this is still bobbing near the surface … LSJ "hold out" and BDAG "hold onto" both give no explanation or references for their choice of meaning of ἐπέχειν in Pilippians 2:16. A starting point for discussion might be, Poythress, V. S., “Hold Fast” versus “Hold Out” in Philippians 2:16,…

1 Corinthians 11:23

1 Corinthians 11:23

1 Cor 11:23 PAREDIDOTO (long) Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu Sat Dec 11 08:58:55 EST 1999   Gal 1:6 Syntax Grammars I have recently been contacted by a “lurker” newly subscribing from “downunder” and posed a knotty complex of problems centering around 1Corinthians 11:23 and particularly the verb PAREDIDOTO there. If he wishesto enter…

Matthew 6:11

Matthew 6:11

Let’s get the text in front of our eyes (see the forum rules above ;->): Matthew 6:11 wrote:Τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δὸς ἡμῖν σήμερον· Luke 11:3b wrote:τὸν ἄρτον ἡμῶν τὸν ἐπιούσιον δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν· So the difference is δὸς ἡμῖν σήμερον versus δίδου ἡμῖν τὸ καθ’ ἡμέραν. I wonder if there are…

John 9:3

John 9:3

[] Punctuation of John 9:3-4 Sarah Madden sarah.r.madden at gmail.com Fri Sep 25 11:54:59 EDT 2009   [] Punctuation of John 9:3-4 [] Punctuation of John 9:3-4 Rob –Not only did the original Greek autographs not have punctuation, they didnot distinguish uppercase from lowercase letters because they were writtenin all caps, and with no spaces…

John 1:18

John 1:18

[] John 1:18b question (and John 1:8) Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu Tue Dec 23 18:01:45 EST 2003   [] John 1:18b question (and John 1:8) [] John 1:18b question (and John 1:8) Please keep this discussion focused on the Greek text rather than upontheological speculations.– Carl W. ConradCo-Chair, ListDepartment of Classics, Washington University…

Mark 2:15

Mark 2:15-16 Punctuation – Nestle vs Tischendorf

I would say Lenski’s first objection is not well formulated, but is on the right track. The verb ἀκολουθεῖν is certainly used mostly in the gospels in the sense of following a leader and especially of discipleship. Even generally in Greek it seems to me the verb usually implies you are going with someone superior and the relationship is positive. If, however, the subject here is the scribes and the verb is taken in a simple neutral sense of following someone to see what he was going to do, it seems inappropriate since Jesus is not said to be going anywhere, he is in someone’s house having a meal.

Regarding how to take καί according to the NA27 punctuation, here are a couple of other quotes which may help:

Kermit Titrud discusses the clause-conjoining function of καί in a 1992 article. He notes that very rarely καί links clauses that are not logically coordinate but one is subordinate to the other, such as Matt 26.45 and others. He continues:

Titrud wrote:
When this skewing between discourse and logical structure occurs, it is the result of the author’s strategy—it is deliberate and significant … By syntactically elevating what is logically subordinate, the author is placing more prominence (emphasis) on the clause than it would have had if introduced by a subordinating conjunction …

K. Titrud ‘The Function of καί in the Greek New Testament and an application to 2 Peter’ in Linguistics and New Testament Interpretation ed. David Alan Black, Broadman Press 1992.

Titrud doesn’t mention Mark 2.15 in this connection, and the skewing here is not the kind he is thinking of, but if the approach can be applied to it, it would suggest Mark is deliberately emphasising the action of following because it was unexpected that tax collectors and sinners would do that.

Also Gundry states on the verse in question:

Gundry wrote:
To take the “and” before “they were following him” as Semitic parataxis for “who” (producing “for there were many who were following him”) tends to miss the distribution of emphasis between the large number and the following (and see M. Reiser, Syntax und Stil 128-30, against treating the construction necessarily as a Semitism).

Robert H. Gundry MARK: A Commentary on His Apology for the Cross Eerdmans 1993.

Regarding the punctuation of Tischendorf it should be taken into account that he followed manuscripts that read an extra καί before ἰδόντες in verse 16. Without that extra καί Tischendorf’s punctuation doesn’t seem to work so well.

Statistics: Posted by Tony Pope — February 7th, 2017, 3:44 pm