Galatians 6:2

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Susan Jeffers susan at read-the-bible.org
Tue Jul 23 11:46:08 EDT 2002

 

KATA IHSOUN XHRISTON 2 Cor 5:17 Greetings ers!I’ve been studying the last 2 chapters of Galatians and Gal 6:1-5 keeps grabbing me. What’s with these “burdens” to be borne?In 6:2 it seems like we’re supposed to be “bearing one another’s burdens” ALLHLWN TA BARH BASTAZETE with respect to our siblings who have transgressed (v.1). Such a burden, cf Louw-Nida 22.4, is a “hardship which is regarded as particularly burdensome and exhausting.” Some other 22s nearby include QLIPSIS [sorry, I don’t remember how to transliterate psi] and KAKIA. Like what the disgruntled workers were griping about in Matthew 20:12 — “us which have borne the burden and heat of the day.” In other places BAROS seems more like a demand laid on someone — Acts 15:28, 2 Cor 4:17, 1 Thess 2:7, Rev 2:24.But then in 6:5 HEKATOS GAR TO IDION FORION BASTASEI. Here the “burden” (NIV & NRSV “load”) I suppose doesn’t have such a connotation of odiousness; more neutral, just baggage, heavy, but perhaps worth carrying. Louw-Nida 15.208 says “a relatively object which is carried” and some other 15s nearby include hAIRW, BASTAZW, AGW.So I’m wondering how I should be thinking about these 2 verses. Here’s this little passage about getting along with one another, at the end of the letter about the law vs the spirit, right after the works of the flesh vs the fruit of the spirit. Folks are supposed to be guided by the spirit (5:26). And what does that guidance look like? 6:1 – if someone is PROLAMBANOed in PARAPTWMA, KATARTZW him. ALLHLWN TA BARH BASTAZETE.Then in 6:3-4, don’t think you’re so great; quit comparing yourself to someone else (presumably the one PROLAMBANOed in PARAPTWMA), but rather (6.5) HEKATOS GAR TO IDION FORION BASTASEI.My question is, are these 2 different, even contrasting things to be borne (BASTAZWed)? My brother’s faults, which are heavy and odious, and my own characteristics, which, while sometimes heavy, are more neutral? Or are the two words BAROS and FORTION being used more synonymously?I’m also thinking of this in relation to Jesus’ words in Matt 7 — even though it’s really a mote in my brother’s eye and a beam in mine, it SEEMS like a beam in his and a mote in mine — which is why my instinct is to give him a hard time and let myself off easy.Thanks in advance for your help on this.Susan JeffersEMail: susan at read-the-bible.orgPeace Church Bible Study Home Page: www.read-the-bible.org

 

KATA IHSOUN XHRISTON2 Cor 5:17

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Tue Jul 23 15:34:40 EDT 2002

 

2 Cor 5:17 2 Cor 5:17 In a message dated 7/23/2002 11:50:58 AM Eastern Daylight Time, susan at read-the-bible.org writes:I’ve been studying the last 2 chapters of Galatians and Gal 6:1-5 keeps grabbing me. What’s with these “burdens” to be borne?In 6:2 it seems like we’re supposed to be “bearing one another’s burdens” ALLHLWN TA BARH BASTAZETE with respect to our siblings who have transgressed (v.1). Such a burden, cf Louw-Nida 22.4, is a “hardship which is regarded as particularly burdensome and exhausting.” <snip>But then in 6:5 HEKATOS GAR TO IDION FORION BASTASEI. Here the “burden” (NIV & NRSV “load”) I suppose doesn’t have such a connotation of odiousness; more neutral, just baggage, heavy, but perhaps worth carrying. Louw-Nida 15.208 says “a relatively object which is carried” and some other 15s nearby include hAIRW, BASTAZW, AGW.So I’m wondering how I should be thinking about these 2 verses. Then in 6:3-4, don’t think you’re so great; quit comparing yourself to someone else (presumably the one PROLAMBANOed in PARAPTWMA), but rather (6.5) HEKATOS GAR TO IDION FORION BASTASEI.My question is, are these 2 different, even contrasting things to be borne (BASTAZWed)? My brother’s faults, which are heavy and odious, and my own characteristics, which, while sometimes heavy, are more neutral? Or are the two words BAROS and FORTION being used more synonymously?I’m also thinking of this in relation to Jesus’ words in Matt 7 — even though it’s really a mote in my brother’s eye and a beam in mine, it SEEMS like a beam in his and a mote in mine — which is why my instinct is to give him a hard time and let myself off easy.________________________Although there are two different words used here for the burden to be borne, I don’t think you’ll find your answer in the lexicography. There is one interesting point regarding FORTION — it is used of cargo in ships — which may have some slight bearing, but I wouldn’t want to press it. What does strike me is the relationship of the phrases to the context. In v. 1 he sets up the general condition that whenever someone fails, others are to restore them. In this context he gives the command to bear one another’s burdens which would then seem to be those of sucumbing to evil. In v. 5 we see the conjunction GAR indicating that this is a conclusion of what precedes which is that each should examine his own works. The works one does would then seem to be the “cargo” one must bear for himself.gfsomsel

 

2 Cor 5:172 Cor 5:17

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Tue Jul 23 16:32:20 EDT 2002

 

2 Cor 5:17 2 Cor 5:17 > My question is, are these 2 different, even contrasting things to> be borne> (BASTAZWed)? My brother’s faults, which are heavy and odious, and my own> characteristics, which, while sometimes heavy, are more neutral? Or are> the two words BAROS and FORTION being used more synonymously?The way I see the two words, they are meant as different and complementary.For the first one, ALLHLWN TA BARH, I envisage Jesus carrying his crosswhich was too heavy. So, someone else carried it for him. This person wasforced to do so, but if we help a brother (or sister) who has a burden whichis too heavy, we fulfil the law of Christ as the last part of 6:2 says (thelaw of love).On the other hand, v. 5 is focused on your own reasonable responsibilities -TO IDION FORTION. There is emphasis on your OWN load. It is yours and shouldnot be placed on others. Some people may be so proud that they refuse tocarry their own load/responsibility and request others to do what theythemselves should be doing. So, carry your own load as much as you can, butif it becomes too heavy, your fellow Christians are encouraged to help youout.Iver LarsenPS. I may be rather quiet on the list for a month or so. We are packing upand moving back to Kenya from a temporary stay in Denmark. But I want tostay on the list, since I am learning a lot from the discussions.

 

2 Cor 5:172 Cor 5:17

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Clwinbery at aol.com Clwinbery at aol.com
Tue Jul 23 21:57:42 EDT 2002

 

2 Cor 5:17 List of common idioms In a message dated 7/23/02 3:32:30 PM, iver_larsen at sil.org writes:>> My question is, are these 2 different, even contrasting things to>> be borne>> (BASTAZWed)? My brother’s faults, which are heavy and odious, and my own>> characteristics, which, while sometimes heavy, are more neutral? Or are>> the two words BAROS and FORTION being used more synonymously?> >The way I see the two words, they are meant as different and complementary.>For the first one, ALLHLWN TA BARH, I envisage Jesus carrying his cross>which was too heavy. So, someone else carried it for him. This person was>forced to do so, but if we help a brother (or sister) who has a burden which>is too heavy, we fulfil the law of Christ as the last part of 6:2 says (the>law of love).> >On the other hand, v. 5 is focused on your own reasonable responsibilities>TO IDION FORTION. There is emphasis on your OWN load. It is yours and should>not be placed on others. Some people may be so proud that they refuse to>carry their own load/responsibility and request others to do what they>themselves should be doing. So, carry your own load as much as you can,>but if it becomes too heavy, your fellow Christians are encouraged to help>you out.> >Iver Larsen> >PS. I may be rather quiet on the list for a month or so. We are packing>up and moving back to Kenya from a temporary stay in Denmark. But I want to>stay on the list, since I am learning a lot from the discussions.I agree with what Iver says here but would add a reference. Barclay comments on FORTION in Matt. 11:30 as a blurb for the carpentry shop. hO GAR ZUGOS MOU CRHSTOS KAI TO FORTION MOU ELAFRON ESTIN. Barclay translates the last clause as “my yoke is well-fitted.” He seems to treat FORTION as relating to the moral responsibility that each must bear. Carlton WinberyLouisiana CollegeP.S. Good journey.

 

2 Cor 5:17List of common idioms

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Wed Jul 24 13:23:01 EDT 2002

 

How To Use New Testament Greek Study Aids – Walter Jerry Clark – Loizeaux Bros. (1984) Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens > In v. 5 we see the conjunction GAR indicating that this is a> conclusion of> what precedes which is that each should examine his own works.> The works one> does would then seem to be the “cargo” one must bear for himself.> > gfsomselJust a brief comment, George. GAR can hardly indicate a conclusion – OUN maydo so. The GAR rather indicates that v. 5 is still on the same overall themeas the preceding verse. It adds another aspect to build on what has justbeen said. The basic function of GAR is too indicate explanation,clarification or a comment needed for a fuller understanding of thepreceding context.Iver Larsen

 

How To Use New Testament Greek Study Aids – Walter Jerry Clark – Loizeaux Bros. (1984)Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Wed Jul 24 13:44:22 EDT 2002

 

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Etymology of Luke’s Name In a message dated 7/24/2002 1:25:15 PM Eastern Daylight Time, iver_larsen at sil.org writes:> In v. 5 we see the conjunction GAR indicating that this is a> conclusion of> what precedes which is that each should examine his own works.> The works one> does would then seem to be the “cargo” one must bear for himself.> > gfsomselJust a brief comment, George. GAR can hardly indicate a conclusion -____________________________________Iver,I think you are getting hung up on technical definitions. When I stated that it expreses a conclution I was referring to an inference which is to be drawn as is indicated in both BGAD and Louw & Nida.BGADGAR (Hom.+; inscr., pap., LXX) conjunction used to express cause, inference, continuation, or to explain. Never comes first in its clause; usu. second, but also third (Hb 11:32), or even fourth (2 Cor 1:19, as e.g. Menand., Epitr. 217; 499; Lucian, Pisc. 10, Philops. 15). 1. cause or reason: for . . .Louw & Nida89.23 GAR: a marker of cause or reason between events, though in some contexts the relation is often remote or tenuous—‘for, because.AUTOS GAR EGINWSEN TI HN EN TWi ANQRWPWi ‘for he knew what was in people’ Jn 2.25; EFIGPM A[P TOU MNHMEIOU, EIXEN GAR AUTAS TROMOS KAI EKSTASIS ‘they ran from the tomb, for they were trembling and amazed’ Mk 16.8.gfsomsel

 

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdensEtymology of Luke’s Name

Gal 6:2 and 6:5 – bearing burdens Iver Larsen iver_larsen at sil.org
Wed Jul 24 17:37:35 EDT 2002

 

Roman 1:17 Translation Greek > Just a brief comment, George. GAR can hardly indicate a conclusion –> ____________________________________> > > Iver,> > I think you are getting hung up on technical definitions. When I > stated that > it expreses a conclution I was referring to an inference which is > to be drawn > as is indicated in both BGAD and Louw & Nida.> > BGAD> GAR (Hom.+; inscr., pap., LXX) conjunction used to express cause, > inference, > continuation, or to explain. Never comes first in its clause; > usu. second, > but also third (Hb 11:32), or even fourth (2 Cor 1:19, as e.g. Menand., > Epitr. 217; 499; Lucian, Pisc. 10, Philops. 15). > 1. cause or reason: for . . .> > Louw & Nida> > 89.23 GAR: a marker of cause or reason between events, though in some > contexts the relation is often remote or tenuous—‘for, because.AUTOS GAR > EGINWSEN TI HN EN TWi ANQRWPWi ‘for he knew what was in people’ Jn 2.25; > EFIGPM A[P TOU MNHMEIOU, EIXEN GAR AUTAS TROMOS KAI EKSTASIS > ‘they ran from > the tomb, for they were trembling and amazed’ Mk 16.8.Actually, it is more serious than that. I believe both BGAD and Louw and Nida are mistaken. GAR does not indicate inference, and the few instances they cite for that sense are better analyzed differently.Iver Larsen

 

Roman 1:17Translation Greek

Gal 6:2 Susan Jeffers susan at read-the-bible.org
Wed Sep 11 07:57:51 EDT 2002

 

Lk 1:79 FWS (Codex Bezae 05) Lk 1:79 FWS (Codex Bezae 05) Is there any reason grammatically why Galatians 6:2, ALLHLWN TA BARH BASTAZETE, bear one another’s burdens, couldn’t also be interpreted as “bear the burdens of one another”, as in “put up with one another, which may be burdensome” ? In other words, seeing ALLHLWN and TA BARH in apposition?Thanks!Susan Jeffers———————————————–EMail: susan at read-the-bible.orgPeace Church Bible Study Home Page: www.read-the-bible.org

 

Lk 1:79 FWS (Codex Bezae 05)Lk 1:79 FWS (Codex Bezae 05)

Gal 6:2 Clwinbery at aol.com Clwinbery at aol.com
Wed Sep 11 11:07:02 EDT 2002

 

Lk 1:76 Acts 9:4 and Luke 10:41 In a message dated 9/11/02 7:09:04 AM, susan at read-the-bible.org writes:>Is there any reason grammatically why Galatians 6:2, ALLHLWN TA BARH >BASTAZETE, bear one another’s burdens, couldn’t also be interpreted as> >“bear the burdens of one another”, as in “put up with one another, which> >may be burdensome” ? In other words, seeing ALLHLWN and TA BARH in apposition?> >Thanks!> >Susan JeffersThe full text:Gal. 6:2. ALLHLWN TA BARH BASTAZETE KAI hOUTWS ANAPLHRWSETE TON NOMON TOU CRISTOU.Susan, this may be a case of not “either/or” but “both/and.” The word BARH carries the meaning of “hardship.” The parable of the workers in Matthew, “those who have born the burden of the day,” = “Those who worked all day.” “The hardship of one another” would include both the faults of one another and the hardship of staying in such a supportive relationship where one persons problems (with sin) becomes a hardship of the whole group.Carlton WinberyLouisiana College

 

Lk 1:76Acts 9:4 and Luke 10:41

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