John 19:14

No subject
Tue May 3 10:41:24 EDT 2011

 

Previous message: No subject Next message: No subject since it is used like this, it normally refers to Friday when used of them. So in John 19.14, when it mentions the PARASKEUH TOU PASCA, it is probably referring to the weekly Friday of Passover, no? Just running thoughts through my head. Sorry if I don’t really make sense. :-)Jason

 

Previous message: No subjectNext message: No subject More information about the mailing list

PARASKEUH Jason Hare parousia_occ at yahoo.com
Tue Apr 25 10:27:25 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Acts 2:42 Next message: FREE SYRIAC (Estrangelo) True Type font I am just curious if you have any information on when the word PARASKEUH (see John 19.14) startedbeing used strictly as Friday. Could it have had that meaning in the passage in John?? I thinkthat would be interesting to find out. If you could provide some info, I’d appreciate it. Days of the Week (Modern Greek): KURIAKH Sunday DEUTERA Monday TRITH Tuesday TETARTH Wednesday PEMPTH Thursday PARASKEUH Friday SABBATO SaturdayJason Hare__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Send online invitations with Yahoo! Invites.http://invites.yahoo.com

 

Previous message: Acts 2:42 Next message: FREE SYRIAC (Estrangelo) True Type font More information about the mailing list

PARASKEUH Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Tue Apr 25 19:21:36 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Fw: greetings, plus a note on 666 Next message: PARASKEUH In a message dated 4/25/2000 8:29:07 AM Central Standard Time, parousia_occ at yahoo.com writes:<< I am just curious if you have any information on when the word PARASKEUH (see John 19.14) started being used strictly as Friday. Could it have had that meaning in the passage in John?? I think that would be interesting to find out. If you could provide some info, I’d appreciate it. >>Roughly contemporary with the gospels, Josephus uses PARASKEUH for Friday in Antiquities 16, 163[162] KAISAR SEBASTOS ARXIEREUS DHMARXIKHS ECOUSIAS LEGEI. EPEIDH TO EQNOS TO TWN IOUDAIWN EUXARISTON EUREQH OU MONON EN TWi ENESTWTI KAIRWi ALLA KAI EN TWi PROGEGENHMENW* KAI MALISTA EPI TPI EMOU PATROS AUTOKRATOROS KAISAROS PROS TON DHMON TON RWMAIWN O TE ARXIEREUS AUTWN hURKANOS [163] EDOCE MOI KAI TWi EMWi SUMBOULIWi META hORKWMOSIAS GNWMHi DHMOU RWMAIWN TOUS IOUDAIOUS XRHSQAI TOIS IDIOS QESMOIS KATA TON PATRION AUTWN NOMON, KAQWS EXRWNTO EPI hURKANOU ARXIEREWS QEOU hUYISTOU, TA TE hIERA EINAI EN ASULIAi KAI ANAPEMPESQAI EIS hIEROSOLUMA KAI APODIDOSQAI TOIS APODOXEUSIN hIEEROSOLUMWN, EGGUAS TE MH hOMOLOGEIN AUTOUS EN SABBATASIN H THi PRO AUTHS PARASKEUHi APO hWRAS ENATEHS.)[162] “Caesar Augustus, high priest and tribune of the people, ordains thus: Since the nation of the Jews hath been found grateful to the Roman people, not only at this time, but in time past also, and chiefly Hyrcanus the high priest, under my father 1 Caesar the emperor, it seemed good to me and my counselors, according to the sentence and oath of the people of Rome, that the Jews have liberty to make use of their own customs, according to the law of their forefathers, as they made use of them under Hyrcanus the high priest of the Almighty God; and that their sacred money be not touched, but be sent to Jerusalem, and that it be committed to the care of the receivers at Jerusalem; and that they be not obliged to go before any judge on the sabbath day, nor on the day of the preparation to it, after the ninth hour. If you would like to read in in true Greek charaters (I know I would), here’s the URL<A HREF=”http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=1999.01.0145&query=section%3D%235767”>http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=1999.01.0145&query=section%3D%235767</A>gfsomsel

 

Previous message: Fw: greetings, plus a note on 666Next message: PARASKEUH More information about the mailing list

PARASKEUH Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Tue Apr 25 20:31:24 EDT 2000

 

Previous message: Acts 2:42 Next message: Luke 24.37 In a message dated 4/25/2000 5:46:55 PM Central Standard Time, parousia_occ at yahoo.com writes:<< From what I can see, it is only used in this connection with the Jews. But since it is used like this, it normally refers to Friday when used of them. So in John 19.14, when it mentions the PARASKEUH TOU PASCA, it is probably referring to the weekly Friday of Passover, no? Just running thoughts through my head. Sorry if I don’t really make sense. 🙂 >>You may not make cents, but sometimes you make dollars.gfsomsel

 

Previous message: Acts 2:42Next message: Luke 24.37 More information about the mailing list

[] PARASKEUH (Preparation vs. Friday) (Was: Re: “The lexiconis wrong!”) Oun Kwon kwonbbl at gmail.com
Tue Sep 25 23:21:16 EDT 2007

 

[] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong [] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong On 9/25/07, Carl W. Conrad <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> wrote:> > On Sep 25, 2007, at 9:00 AM, frjsilver at optonline.net wrote:> > > Dear Friends —> >> > Oh, my! YES! There are many outstanding examples of this problem> > and I consistently stumble across new ones.> >> > The situation is exacerbated because (in my experience, although> > I’m far from alone in this) ‘mainstream scholarship’ is often stuck> > in first gear and on the whole exhibits the same liabilities as the> > lexikons. It’s those of us outside that ‘mainstream’ who often> > have a better handle on the text.> >> > Consider TRAPEZA in Acts 6. Traditionally, it was thought that the> > apostles were ‘waiting tables’ at the expense of their time and> > energy which should have been devoted to preaching and teaching, so> > they asked the Church to select seven deacons to take over the> > menial work.> >> > It’s true that some commentaries barely allow the possibility that> > there might be a resonance of financial administration here, but> > most completely miss the point.> >> > Guess what H EQNIKH TRAPEZA THS hELLADOS is? No fair peeking, but> > I’ll give you a hint: It’s The National Bank of Greece!> >> > People who speak Greek get the meaning of Acts 6 right off the bat,> > but the experts and scholars who don’t speak the language are too> > unconsciously comfortable in their dead lexikons to understand what> > was going on.> > I think there’s a logical short-circuit here; one might just as well> say that one who speaks (Modern) Greek may be all too unconsciously> comfortable about understanding the usage of a modern Greek word to> be the same as that of the ancient word so-spelled. It is not quite> the case that those who speak Greek today speak NT Koine Greek.> Carl’s comment here reminds me of PARASKEUH appearing in the Gospels.Most of people think it means something of Friday and some Englishtranslations outrightly put this into the text to translate ‘day ofpreparation’. I think it is based on erroneous retro-jection of themodern Gk usage of this word.I am curious how the modern Gk got this word to say ‘Friday’. Was itfrom influence of the Eastern Orthodox church which takes’preparation’ as Friday from ‘preparation of the weekly Sabbath’?Here again, I do not find any such expression in the N.T. (and O.T.)Do the Hebrew speaking people (including modern Israelis) ever thinkof preparing something specially in Friday for the coming Sabbath?In all occurrences of this expression ‘(day of) preparation’ (about 6of them in the Gospels), I do not see any inkling of ‘preparation forsabbath’. It must be understood simply as ‘preparation for theFestival’.For those with Friday crucifixion scenario it really does not matter,but for those with other alternative (I am for Thursday crucifixion,rather than Wednesday), every texts with this word make sense if onesimply take it as ‘preparation (for the Festival)’. In G-John thereis one spot using the expression ‘preparation of Passover’. Here, itseems obvious that ‘Passover’ itself refers to the Festival per se.Please correct me,Oun Kwon.

 

[] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong[] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong

[] PARASKEUH (Preparation vs. Friday) (Was: Re: “Thelexicon is wrong!”) George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Tue Sep 25 23:54:34 EDT 2007

 

[] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong [] New UBS text, some thoughts on printing and binding This is not merely a modern Greek usage but was something observed in NT times a previously. While the list is not devoted to the discussion of religious practices, I suppose this would further the understanding of the Greek text so I will mention it. You might read the linked passage from the _Jewish Encyclopedia_http://www.jewishencyclopedia.com/view.jsp?artid=13&letter=S&search=sabbath#72orhttp://tinyurl.com/2kvtcx georgegfsomsel Therefore, O faithful Christian, search for truth, hear truth, learn truth, love truth, speak the truth, hold the truth, defend the truth till death. – Jan Hus_________—– Original Message —-From: Oun Kwon <kwonbbl at gmail.com>To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Tuesday, September 25, 2007 11:21:16 PMSubject: [] PARASKEUH (Preparation vs. Friday) (Was: Re: “The lexicon is wrong!”)On 9/25/07, Carl W. Conrad <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu> wrote:> > On Sep 25, 2007, at 9:00 AM, frjsilver at optonline.net wrote:> > > Dear Friends —> >> > Oh, my! YES! There are many outstanding examples of this problem> > and I consistently stumble across new ones.> >> > The situation is exacerbated because (in my experience, although> > I’m far from alone in this) ‘mainstream scholarship’ is often stuck> > in first gear and on the whole exhibits the same liabilities as the> > lexikons. It’s those of us outside that ‘mainstream’ who often> > have a better handle on the text.> >> > Consider TRAPEZA in Acts 6. Traditionally, it was thought that the> > apostles were ‘waiting tables’ at the expense of their time and> > energy which should have been devoted to preaching and teaching, so> > they asked the Church to select seven deacons to take over the> > menial work.> >> > It’s true that some commentaries barely allow the possibility that> > there might be a resonance of financial administration here, but> > most completely miss the point.> >> > Guess what H EQNIKH TRAPEZA THS hELLADOS is? No fair peeking, but> > I’ll give you a hint: It’s The National Bank of Greece!> >> > People who speak Greek get the meaning of Acts 6 right off the bat,> > but the experts and scholars who don’t speak the language are too> > unconsciously comfortable in their dead lexikons to understand what> > was going on.> > I think there’s a logical short-circuit here; one might just as well> say that one who speaks (Modern) Greek may be all too unconsciously> comfortable about understanding the usage of a modern Greek word to> be the same as that of the ancient word so-spelled. It is not quite> the case that those who speak Greek today speak NT Koine Greek.> Carl’s comment here reminds me of PARASKEUH appearing in the Gospels.Most of people think it means something of Friday and some Englishtranslations outrightly put this into the text to translate ‘day ofpreparation’. I think it is based on erroneous retro-jection of themodern Gk usage of this word.I am curious how the modern Gk got this word to say ‘Friday’. Was itfrom influence of the Eastern Orthodox church which takes’preparation’ as Friday from ‘preparation of the weekly Sabbath’?Here again, I do not find any such expression in the N.T. (and O.T.)Do the Hebrew speaking people (including modern Israelis) ever thinkof preparing something specially in Friday for the coming Sabbath?In all occurrences of this expression ‘(day of) preparation’ (about 6of them in the Gospels), I do not see any inkling of ‘preparation forsabbath’. It must be understood simply as ‘preparation for theFestival’.For those with Friday crucifixion scenario it really does not matter,but for those with other alternative (I am for Thursday crucifixion,rather than Wednesday), every texts with this word make sense if onesimply take it as ‘preparation (for the Festival)’. In G-John thereis one spot using the expression ‘preparation of Passover’. Here, itseems obvious that ‘Passover’ itself refers to the Festival per se.Please correct me,Oun Kwon.— home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.orghttp://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/ ____________________________________________________________________________________Need a vacation? Get great dealsto amazing places on Yahoo! Travel.http://travel.yahoo.com/

 

[] The Grrek Lexicon Is Wrong[] New UBS text, some thoughts on printing and binding

People who read this article also liked:

[AuthorRecommendedPosts]

3 thoughts on “John 19:14

  1. Leon Bible Leon Bible says:

    Here it is the “real” deal. If a person can read and can count and believes the Bible then there is only ONE conclusion: Passover was on Wednesday.

    Matthew 12:40 For as Jonas was three days and three nights in the whale’s belly; so shall the Son of man be three days and three nights in the heart of the earth.

    Christ was dead for three full days and for three full nights. He was put in the grave Wednesday just before sunset and was resurrected at the end of Saturday at sunset. Good Friday should be changed to Good Wednesday. No statement says that He was buried Friday at sunset. This would make Him in the grave only one day and one night, proving His own words untrue (Mt. 12:40).

    Finis Jennings Dake, Dake’s Annotated Reference Bible: Containing the Old and New Testaments of the Authorized or King James Version Text, (Lawrenceville, GA: Dake Bible Sales, Inc., 1997), WORDsearch CROSS e-book, Under: “Chapter 12”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>