John 6:6

ok, I've missed and did not mendion some other ways the English builds the Plural, besides the S-morphem. Thanks for the additional examples. Fish->fish is not morphologically marked. Man->men (Stemvocal change) and some other nice examples. That's possible here in German as well - but I think we have plenty of more ways. Yours Peter Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — April 9th, 2014, 6:27 am
 
Peter Streitenberger wrote: Translation of the quote above (for the folks not understanding German as Carl does): "Where can we find such examples?" - - - snip snip - - - (English has the S-plural - which is enough and provides everything one needs to know). - - - - snip snip - - - Peter, Germany
Lieber Peter, English, with the S-plural : mouses, mans, leafs, datums, sheeps, fishs, flys, childs, cactuss, gooses, oxs, tooths, foots, criterions :-) Shirley Rollinson Statistics: Posted by Shirley Rollinson — April 8th, 2014, 7:34 pm
Translation of the quote above (for the folks not understanding German as Carl does): "Where can we find such examples?" I find the esimation of Mark Twain on the German languange a bit too harsh - as no languange has deserved such a bitter statement (maybe Mark had a bad teacher). Of course there are many exceptions, rules and hard stuff and e.g nine ways to build the plural of nouns (English has the S-plural - which is enough and provides everything one needs to know). But there are rules, but most Germans don't know them - it's a matter of interest. The progressive tenses (past and present) would be a nice thing to have - I'd buy it - but we have the nine ways of building the plural and other such nice things instead.....Another problem here: no one still knows the pragmatic and semantic difference between the Perfect and the Imperfect - there was one, but it's almost vanished. Peter, Germany Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — April 6th, 2014, 10:21 am
 
Barry Hofstetter wrote:
Peter Streitenberger wrote: I'm sometimes unhappy that the German language hasn't this easy way to express the Greek Imperfect without additional Adverbs, that means that this feature isn't morphologically encoded. A good way for the English languange to use the past progressive tense. My congratulations - can we borrow it?
We would be glad to rent it to you. The famous American humorist Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain), had quite a bit to say about learning German: http://www.crossmyt.com/hc/linghebr/awfgrmlg.html This despite the fact we have surviving examples of several letters that Twain wrote in German, and apparently they are quite good German.
Wo finden wir solche? Möchten Sie bitte uns einen Beleg liefern? Statistics: Posted by cwconrad — April 6th, 2014, 9:54 am
 
Peter Streitenberger wrote: I'm sometimes unhappy that the German language hasn't this easy way to express the Greek Imperfect without additional Adverbs, that means that this feature isn't morphologically encoded. A good way for the English languange to use the past progressive tense. My congratulations - can we borrow it?
We would be glad to rent it to you. The famous American humorist Samuel Clemens (aka Mark Twain), had quite a bit to say about learning German: http://www.crossmyt.com/hc/linghebr/awfgrmlg.html This despite the fact we have surviving examples of several letters that Twain wrote in German, and apparently they are quite good German. Statistics: Posted by Barry Hofstetter — April 6th, 2014, 7:58 am
 
Stephen Carlson wrote: I think the English past progressive does this well: "He was saying this to test him, for he himself knew what to do." Most translations, except the NASB, don't do this however, I guess because the elaboration purpose is pretty clear even from a simple past.
I'm sometimes unhappy that the German language hasn't this easy way to express the Greek Imperfect without additional Adverbs, that means that this feature isn't morphologically encoded. A good way for the English languange to use the past progressive tense. My congratulations - can we borrow it? Yours Peter Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — April 5th, 2014, 5:53 am
I think the English past progressive does this well: "He was saying this to test him, for he himself knew what to do." Most translations, except the NASB, don't do this however, I guess because the elaboration purpose is pretty clear even from a simple past. Statistics: Posted by Stephen Carlson — April 4th, 2014, 9:11 am
Agreed, Stephen, is there a way to grasp that in a translation? Yours Peter Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — April 4th, 2014, 9:01 am
Though both forms can be used with the same propositional truth values, I think the imperfect helps to convey that this statement is part of the background to the main story line. Statistics: Posted by Stephen Carlson — April 4th, 2014, 8:46 am
Dear friends and collegues, John 6:6 Τοῦτο δὲ ἔλεγεν πειράζων αὐτόν· αὐτὸς γὰρ ᾔδει τί ἔμελλεν ποιεῖν. Why used John the Imperfect ἔλεγεν and not an Aorist form? What intended force could that imply? Is he saying that while/as/during Jesus was saying that he wanted to test his disciple? Thanks for all help - even suggestions are highly welcome ! Yours Peter Statistics: Posted by Peter Streitenberger — April 4th, 2014, 8:25 am

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16 thoughts on “John 6:6

  1. Tommy Comer says:

    Because there was previously, and would be another future time, when the flock of Israel would be in the wilderness like sheep without a shepherd. It would be there that they would be given food from the hand of God, miraculously. In exodus it was manna, here it is loaves and fish, and in Revelation 12 it is ‘a place prepared where they shall nourish her 1,260 days’

  2. Tommy Comer Tommy Comer says:

    Because there was previously, and would be another future time, when the flock of Israel would be in the wilderness like sheep without a shepherd. It would be there that they would be given food from the hand of God, miraculously. In exodus it was manna, here it is loaves and fish, and in Revelation 12 it is ‘a place prepared where they shall nourish her 1,260 days’

  3. Some people read tradition as the basis of truth.
    Others read scripture as the basis of truth.

    these two groups usually don’t agree on important issues.

    Of course those with different traditions often accept others with others traditions… as long as someone is not claiming the truth they believe has a basis in scripture. If they do that, they will be called heretics by the traditionalist.

  4. Some people read tradition as the basis of truth.
    Others read scripture as the basis of truth.

    these two groups usually don’t agree on important issues.

    Of course those with different traditions often accept others with others traditions… as long as someone is not claiming the truth they believe has a basis in scripture. If they do that, they will be called heretics by the traditionalist.

  5. Piolet asked “What is truth?” John 18:38 Jesus said: “I am the way and THE TRUTH and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” (John 14:6)
    Jesus told his disciples “I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you…THE SPIRIT OF TRUTH.” (John 14:16-17) “But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you INTO ALL THE TRUTH …” (John 16:13)
    “Sanctify them by the truth; YOUR WORD IS TRUTH. ” (John 17:17)

  6. Piolet asked “What is truth?” John 18:38 Jesus said: “I am the way and THE TRUTH and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.” (John 14:6)
    Jesus told his disciples “I will ask the Father, and he will give you another advocate to help you…THE SPIRIT OF TRUTH.” (John 14:16-17) “But when he, the Spirit of truth, comes, he will guide you INTO ALL THE TRUTH …” (John 16:13)
    “Sanctify them by the truth; YOUR WORD IS TRUTH. ” (John 17:17)

  7. John 6:6 not only does this verse give us a good look at the student but it also gives us a good look at the teacher, his personal care, instruction, and foresight. Jesus is the Master, here and always, proving and giving opportunity to prove what is really in the heart.
    The idea that God tests a mans faith, that faith is only relevant in obedience to the will of God, used to be common in Pentecost. Sad really that the church today which has been given so much more, has so much less.
    I think we have failed this generation. I think Phillip proved himself better than we have…
    Maybe tonight or tomorrow we’ll get another chance to prove our devotion is real and our repentance sincere. Maybe tomorrow we’ll have the right answer for hungry men and for Jesus…

  8. Jesus knew what he was going to do.
    If we know the TRUTH why are we doing what we know to do?
    Why are we not carrying out the GREAT COMMISION?
    Why are not witnessing in the POWER OF TE HOLY GHOST?
    Why are we not seeing the POWER OF THE HOLY GHOST being witnessed?
    Or are we serving another truth?

  9. John 6:6 not only does this verse give us a good look at the student but it also gives us a good look at the teacher, his personal care, instruction, and foresight. Jesus is the Master, here and always, proving and giving opportunity to prove what is really in the heart.
    The idea that God tests a mans faith, that faith is only relevant in obedience to the will of God, used to be common in Pentecost. Sad really that the church today which has been given so much more, has so much less.
    I think we have failed this generation. I think Phillip proved himself better than we have…
    Maybe tonight or tomorrow we’ll get another chance to prove our devotion is real and our repentance sincere. Maybe tomorrow we’ll have the right answer for hungry men and for Jesus…

  10. Jesus knew what he was going to do.
    If we know the TRUTH why are we doing what we know to do?
    Why are we not carrying out the GREAT COMMISION?
    Why are not witnessing in the POWER OF TE HOLY GHOST?
    Why are we not seeing the POWER OF THE HOLY GHOST being witnessed?
    Or are we serving another truth?

  11. Troy Day says:

    I think the English past progressive does this well: “He was saying this to test him, for he himself knew what to do.” Most translations, except the NASB, don’t do this however, I guess because the elaboration purpose is pretty clear even from a simple past

  12. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    I think the English past progressive does this well: “He was saying this to test him, for he himself knew what to do.” Most translations, except the NASB, don’t do this however, I guess because the elaboration purpose is pretty clear even from a simple past

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