Luke 11:28

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Mark Goodacre M.S.GOODACRE at bham.ac.uk
Wed May 5 12:44:17 EDT 1999

 

Hebrews 11:1 P. Comfort’s new book I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are those . . .” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g. Rom. 10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil. 3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”Any thoughts?ThanksMark————————————–Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre at bham.ac.uk Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512 University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 6866 Birmingham B15 2TT United Kingdomhttp://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre Aseneth Home Page Recommended New Testament Web Resources Mark Without Q

 

Hebrews 11:1P. Comfort’s new book

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Mark Goodacre M.S.GOODACRE at bham.ac.uk
Wed May 5 12:44:17 EDT 1999

 

Hebrews 11:1 P. Comfort’s new book I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are those . . .” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g. Rom. 10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil. 3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”Any thoughts?ThanksMark————————————–Dr Mark Goodacre mailto:M.S.Goodacre at bham.ac.uk Dept of Theology tel: +44 121 414 7512 University of Birmingham fax: +44 121 414 6866 Birmingham B15 2TT United Kingdomhttp://www.bham.ac.uk/theology/goodacre Aseneth Home Page Recommended New Testament Web Resources Mark Without Q

 

Hebrews 11:1P. Comfort’s new book

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 atombomb at sirius.com atombomb at sirius.com
Wed May 5 14:19:19 EDT 1999

 

Hebrews 11:1 P. Comfort’s new book CHRIST IS RISEN!Mark Goodacre wrote:> > I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:> > Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> > The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of> God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to> translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are those . .> .” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g. Rom.> 10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil.> 3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”Liddell & Scott: *men oun* is freq. used with a corresponding *de*,so that each Particle retains its force, Od. 4.780, Pi. O. 1.111, S.OT 244, 843, Ph. 359, D. 2.5, etc: but frequently also in an absolutesense, “so then”, S. Ant. 65; … especially in replies, sometimes instrong afffirmation, *pantapasi men oun* Plato, Thaeatetus 158d…[but] also to substitute a new statement so as to correct a precedingstatement, “nay rather” [my favorite example is “‘Wipe your nose on myhead?’… ‘Nay rather, on mine!'” Ar. Eq. 9.11]; L&S also quotes thesubject passage (Lk 11.28), translating as “yea rather, pointing to Rm9.20 as an example of the same.Indeed, that’s the way the fathers read it– positive, rather thandisjunctive. Someone recently pointed out to me that in the Britishlanguage, “rather”, pronounced “rah-THER!” can indeed mean, “indeed!”or “rather so!”.I think a translation as positive or affirmative “indeed” would be farmore in keeping with the general thought of St Luke than a disjunctive”rather” (as we tend to read it, really out of an anti-Catholic polemic):”Indeed, happy are those who hear the word of God, and keep it”‘ (Lk11.28), for “the [seed] in the good ground, is those who hear the wordwith a good and noble heart, preserve it and bear fruit in patience”(Lk 8.15). And who is the example of this? Only six verses later Jesussays, “My mother and my brothers are these (outoi) who are hearing theword of God and doing it” (Lk8.21). The theme ofhearing-keeping-doing-bringing forth fruit and blessedness seems to bemore than a little emphasized– Mary is twice portrayed as the one who”kept all these words, turning them over in her heart” (Lk 2.19), orwho “preserved all these words in her heart” (Lk 2.51); she is calledblessed (*makarios*) three times– “blessed is she who believed thatthere will be a completion to the things said to her by the Lord!” (Lk1.45), “Blessed among women… the mother of my Lord”‘! (Lk 1.42-43),and she herself says, “All generations will call me blessed” (Lk1.48). Of course, if “those who hear the word with a good and nobleheart, preserve it and bear fruit” (8.15)– her fruit is most blessed:”Blessed [indeed!] is the fruit of [her] womb” (Lk 1.42)!So the scenario in Lk 11.28 is not that, as we usually read this,Jesus is being cruel to his mother and brothers, who are outsidetrying to see him (I would have trouble with this anyway), but that heis pointing them out as examples of what he’s talking about (faith)and welcoming them in as indeed close to him on that basis. And ofcourse we know that the “brothers of the Lord” played a big role inthe early Christian community, so in the gospel of Luke this phrasewould possibly have been read as some kind of an affirmation of them.The problem is, this gets you into the whole discussion of the placeof the Virgin Mary, which has been such a shibboleth inProtestant-Catholic relations, and is fraught with emotional significance!Indeed he is risen!John Burnett, MA (OT)

 

Hebrews 11:1P. Comfort’s new book

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 atombomb at sirius.com atombomb at sirius.com
Wed May 5 14:19:19 EDT 1999

 

Hebrews 11:1 P. Comfort’s new book CHRIST IS RISEN!Mark Goodacre wrote:> > I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:> > Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> > The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of> God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to> translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are those . .> .” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g. Rom.> 10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil.> 3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”Liddell & Scott: *men oun* is freq. used with a corresponding *de*,so that each Particle retains its force, Od. 4.780, Pi. O. 1.111, S.OT 244, 843, Ph. 359, D. 2.5, etc: but frequently also in an absolutesense, “so then”, S. Ant. 65; … especially in replies, sometimes instrong afffirmation, *pantapasi men oun* Plato, Thaeatetus 158d…[but] also to substitute a new statement so as to correct a precedingstatement, “nay rather” [my favorite example is “‘Wipe your nose on myhead?’… ‘Nay rather, on mine!'” Ar. Eq. 9.11]; L&S also quotes thesubject passage (Lk 11.28), translating as “yea rather, pointing to Rm9.20 as an example of the same.Indeed, that’s the way the fathers read it– positive, rather thandisjunctive. Someone recently pointed out to me that in the Britishlanguage, “rather”, pronounced “rah-THER!” can indeed mean, “indeed!”or “rather so!”.I think a translation as positive or affirmative “indeed” would be farmore in keeping with the general thought of St Luke than a disjunctive”rather” (as we tend to read it, really out of an anti-Catholic polemic):”Indeed, happy are those who hear the word of God, and keep it”‘ (Lk11.28), for “the [seed] in the good ground, is those who hear the wordwith a good and noble heart, preserve it and bear fruit in patience”(Lk 8.15). And who is the example of this? Only six verses later Jesussays, “My mother and my brothers are these (outoi) who are hearing theword of God and doing it” (Lk8.21). The theme ofhearing-keeping-doing-bringing forth fruit and blessedness seems to bemore than a little emphasized– Mary is twice portrayed as the one who”kept all these words, turning them over in her heart” (Lk 2.19), orwho “preserved all these words in her heart” (Lk 2.51); she is calledblessed (*makarios*) three times– “blessed is she who believed thatthere will be a completion to the things said to her by the Lord!” (Lk1.45), “Blessed among women… the mother of my Lord”‘! (Lk 1.42-43),and she herself says, “All generations will call me blessed” (Lk1.48). Of course, if “those who hear the word with a good and nobleheart, preserve it and bear fruit” (8.15)– her fruit is most blessed:”Blessed [indeed!] is the fruit of [her] womb” (Lk 1.42)!So the scenario in Lk 11.28 is not that, as we usually read this,Jesus is being cruel to his mother and brothers, who are outsidetrying to see him (I would have trouble with this anyway), but that heis pointing them out as examples of what he’s talking about (faith)and welcoming them in as indeed close to him on that basis. And ofcourse we know that the “brothers of the Lord” played a big role inthe early Christian community, so in the gospel of Luke this phrasewould possibly have been read as some kind of an affirmation of them.The problem is, this gets you into the whole discussion of the placeof the Virgin Mary, which has been such a shibboleth inProtestant-Catholic relations, and is fraught with emotional significance!Indeed he is risen!John Burnett, MA (OT)

 

Hebrews 11:1P. Comfort’s new book

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Edgar Krentz ekrentz at lstc.edu
Wed May 5 16:29:46 EDT 1999

 

Machen Greek NT Exercises Machen Greek NT Exercises >I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:> >Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> >The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of>God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to>translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are>those . .>.” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g.>Rom.>10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil.>3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”> >Any thoughts?> >Thanks> >MarkCheck LSJ, sv B.II.2: frequently used as an ablsolute: “so then.” Theyclaim that in the NT it means “nay, rather.” I think your translation ispossible++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Edgar KrentzProfessor of New Testament EmeritusLutheran School of Theology at Chicago1100 E. 55th StreetChicago, IL 60615 USA773-256-0752e-mail: ekrentz at lstc.edu (Office) emkrentz at mcs.com (Home)+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Machen Greek NT ExercisesMachen Greek NT Exercises

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Edgar Krentz ekrentz at lstc.edu
Wed May 5 16:29:46 EDT 1999

 

Machen Greek NT Exercises Machen Greek NT Exercises >I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:> >Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> >The standard translation is “Blessed *rather* are those who hear the word of>God and keep it”. But I am wondering whether it might be legitimate to>translate more along the lines of “Indeed — and blessed moreover are>those . .>.” or some such thing. There seems to be some ground for doing this, e.g.>Rom.>10.18 where MENOUNGE might reasonably be translated “Indeed . . .” or Phil.>3.8, also MENOUNGE, “Indeed I count everything as loss . . .”> >Any thoughts?> >Thanks> >MarkCheck LSJ, sv B.II.2: frequently used as an ablsolute: “so then.” Theyclaim that in the NT it means “nay, rather.” I think your translation ispossible++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++Edgar KrentzProfessor of New Testament EmeritusLutheran School of Theology at Chicago1100 E. 55th StreetChicago, IL 60615 USA773-256-0752e-mail: ekrentz at lstc.edu (Office) emkrentz at mcs.com (Home)+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

 

Machen Greek NT ExercisesMachen Greek NT Exercises

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Stephen C. Carlson scarlson at mindspring.com
Thu May 6 00:41:17 EDT 1999

 

Machen Greek NT Exercises MENOUN in Luke 11.28 At 11:19 AM 5/5/99 -0700, atombomb at sirius.com wrote:>Mark Goodacre wrote:>> I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:>> >> Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> >I think a translation as positive or affirmative “indeed” would be far>more in keeping with the general thought of St Luke than a disjunctive>“rather” (as we tend to read it, really out of an anti-Catholic polemic):Interestingly, two common Roman Catholic translations, the Rheims Bibleand the New American Bible, both render MENOUN with “rather” as in “Yearather” and “Rather” respectively. Indeed, the “Yea rather” of theRheims agrees with the Authorized (KJV).I suppose that both MENOUN and English “rather” are ambiguous, expressingboth affirmative and negative (or at least contrastive) meanings, dependingon the context. The translations have chosen different ways to handle this:the KJV and the Rheims resolve MENOUN affirmatively (“Yea rather, blessed …”),the NAB ambiguously (“Rather, blessed are thou..), and the leading modernProtestant versions contrastively (“On the contrary, blessed …” NASB;”Blessed rather …” NIV, NRSV, Amplified). My translational preference isfor the translation that is just as ambiguous as the source text, but myexegetical preference is for the affirmative meaning, as argued by Mark andJohn.Stephen Carlson–Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson at mindspring.comSynoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/”Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words.” Shujing 2.35

 

Machen Greek NT ExercisesMENOUN in Luke 11.28

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Maurice A. O’Sullivan mauros at iol.ie
Thu May 6 05:56:27 EDT 1999

 

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Acts 2:6 At 00:41 06/05/99 -0400, you wrote:> >Interestingly, two common Roman Catholic translations, the Rheims Bible>and the New American Bible, both render MENOUN with “rather” as in “Yea>rather” and “Rather” respectively. Indeed, the “Yea rather” of the>Rheims agrees with the Authorized (KJV).Stephen;Two more R.C translations are in agreement ( contra the number of times theNJB changes some very odd translations in the JB )JB:’Still happier those who hear the word of God and keep it!’NJB:More blessed still are those who hear the word of God and OTOH, Fitzmyer, in his own translation for the Anchor Bible volume 28A, gives:” Blessed rather are ……..”And on p. 928, he has an informative note, which I won’t attempt toreproduce in full.Initially making the point that here MENOUN is used at the head of asentence, against classical Greek usage.He then goes on to list three different usages:(a) adversative(b) affirmative(c) corrective [ “yes, but rather” ]Citing Thrall in ” Greek Particles in the N.T”, “for Luke the first twouses are to be eliminated ” , quoting Thrall’s reasons.He concludes ” hence, the last corrective sense is to be preferred” and weare referred to Moule’s ‘Idiiom Book’ Hope this is of help.MauriceMaurice A. O’Sullivan[Bray, Ireland ]”Be certain your feet are planted in theright place before you decide to stand firm!”

 

MENOUN in Luke 11.28Acts 2:6

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Stephen C. Carlson scarlson at mindspring.com
Thu May 6 00:41:17 EDT 1999

 

Machen Greek NT Exercises MENOUN in Luke 11.28 At 11:19 AM 5/5/99 -0700, atombomb at sirius.com wrote:>Mark Goodacre wrote:>> I would be grateful for any help on the translation of the following:>> >> Luke 11.28: MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.> >I think a translation as positive or affirmative “indeed” would be far>more in keeping with the general thought of St Luke than a disjunctive>“rather” (as we tend to read it, really out of an anti-Catholic polemic):Interestingly, two common Roman Catholic translations, the Rheims Bibleand the New American Bible, both render MENOUN with “rather” as in “Yearather” and “Rather” respectively. Indeed, the “Yea rather” of theRheims agrees with the Authorized (KJV).I suppose that both MENOUN and English “rather” are ambiguous, expressingboth affirmative and negative (or at least contrastive) meanings, dependingon the context. The translations have chosen different ways to handle this:the KJV and the Rheims resolve MENOUN affirmatively (“Yea rather, blessed …”),the NAB ambiguously (“Rather, blessed are thou..), and the leading modernProtestant versions contrastively (“On the contrary, blessed …” NASB;”Blessed rather …” NIV, NRSV, Amplified). My translational preference isfor the translation that is just as ambiguous as the source text, but myexegetical preference is for the affirmative meaning, as argued by Mark andJohn.Stephen Carlson–Stephen C. Carlson mailto:scarlson at mindspring.comSynoptic Problem Home Page http://www.mindspring.com/~scarlson/synopt/”Poetry speaks of aspirations, and songs chant the words.” Shujing 2.35

 

Machen Greek NT ExercisesMENOUN in Luke 11.28

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Maurice A. O’Sullivan mauros at iol.ie
Thu May 6 05:56:27 EDT 1999

 

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 Acts 2:6 At 00:41 06/05/99 -0400, you wrote:> >Interestingly, two common Roman Catholic translations, the Rheims Bible>and the New American Bible, both render MENOUN with “rather” as in “Yea>rather” and “Rather” respectively. Indeed, the “Yea rather” of the>Rheims agrees with the Authorized (KJV).Stephen;Two more R.C translations are in agreement ( contra the number of times theNJB changes some very odd translations in the JB )JB:’Still happier those who hear the word of God and keep it!’NJB:More blessed still are those who hear the word of God and OTOH, Fitzmyer, in his own translation for the Anchor Bible volume 28A, gives:” Blessed rather are ……..”And on p. 928, he has an informative note, which I won’t attempt toreproduce in full.Initially making the point that here MENOUN is used at the head of asentence, against classical Greek usage.He then goes on to list three different usages:(a) adversative(b) affirmative(c) corrective [ “yes, but rather” ]Citing Thrall in ” Greek Particles in the N.T”, “for Luke the first twouses are to be eliminated ” , quoting Thrall’s reasons.He concludes ” hence, the last corrective sense is to be preferred” and weare referred to Moule’s ‘Idiiom Book’ Hope this is of help.MauriceMaurice A. O’Sullivan[Bray, Ireland ]”Be certain your feet are planted in theright place before you decide to stand firm!”

 

MENOUN in Luke 11.28Acts 2:6

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 atombomb at sirius.com atombomb at sirius.com
Thu May 6 13:38:11 EDT 1999

 

Acts 2:6 Acts 2:6 CHRIST IS RISEN!”Maurice A. O’Sullivan” wrote:> > OTOH, Fitzmyer, in his own translation for the Anchor Bible volume 28A, gives:> ” Blessed rather are ……..”> And on p. 928, he has an informative note, which I won’t attempt to> reproduce in full.> Initially making the point that here MENOUN is used at the head of a> sentence, against classical Greek usage.Well, Liddell & Scott does adduce the 2d c. AD Phrynicus (at 322). But clearly, *men* and its permutations are usually postpositive. L&Sgive “yea, rather”; the NT use is unusual among the sources we have.> He then goes on to list three different usages:> (a) adversative> (b) affirmative> (c) corrective [ “yes, but rather” ]> > Citing Thrall in ” Greek Particles in the N.T”, “for Luke the first two> uses are to be eliminated ” , quoting Thrall’s reasons.> He concludes ” hence, the last corrective sense is to be preferred” and we> are referred to Moule’s ‘Idiiom Book’I’d like to see these reasons (unfortunately I have neither Thrall norFitzmeyer handy)– again, we’re perilously close to an area ofhistorically rather heated inter-confessional argument, and it’s notas though scholars have always been entirely unaffected byconfessional prejudice or traditional readings! It’s just hard to seehow a “corrective” makes sense in the light of 8.15,21; 2.19,51; 1.48and also 1.42-43 (where it says *euloghmenh/os* not *makarios* as Isaid the other day–oops!)– all of which seem to be pretty strongstatements about Mary as one who exemplifies the kind of faithfulnessJesus speaks of at 11.28– unless it’s a rather soft corrective–something more along the lines of “Certainly! but it’s because theyare blessed who hear… and keep…”INDEED HE IS RISEN!John Burnett, MA (OT)

 

Acts 2:6Acts 2:6

MENOUN in Luke 11.28 atombomb at sirius.com atombomb at sirius.com
Thu May 6 13:38:11 EDT 1999

 

Acts 2:6 Acts 2:6 CHRIST IS RISEN!”Maurice A. O’Sullivan” wrote:> > OTOH, Fitzmyer, in his own translation for the Anchor Bible volume 28A, gives:> ” Blessed rather are ……..”> And on p. 928, he has an informative note, which I won’t attempt to> reproduce in full.> Initially making the point that here MENOUN is used at the head of a> sentence, against classical Greek usage.Well, Liddell & Scott does adduce the 2d c. AD Phrynicus (at 322). But clearly, *men* and its permutations are usually postpositive. L&Sgive “yea, rather”; the NT use is unusual among the sources we have.> He then goes on to list three different usages:> (a) adversative> (b) affirmative> (c) corrective [ “yes, but rather” ]> > Citing Thrall in ” Greek Particles in the N.T”, “for Luke the first two> uses are to be eliminated ” , quoting Thrall’s reasons.> He concludes ” hence, the last corrective sense is to be preferred” and we> are referred to Moule’s ‘Idiiom Book’I’d like to see these reasons (unfortunately I have neither Thrall norFitzmeyer handy)– again, we’re perilously close to an area ofhistorically rather heated inter-confessional argument, and it’s notas though scholars have always been entirely unaffected byconfessional prejudice or traditional readings! It’s just hard to seehow a “corrective” makes sense in the light of 8.15,21; 2.19,51; 1.48and also 1.42-43 (where it says *euloghmenh/os* not *makarios* as Isaid the other day–oops!)– all of which seem to be pretty strongstatements about Mary as one who exemplifies the kind of faithfulnessJesus speaks of at 11.28– unless it’s a rather soft corrective–something more along the lines of “Certainly! but it’s because theyare blessed who hear… and keep…”INDEED HE IS RISEN!John Burnett, MA (OT)

 

Acts 2:6Acts 2:6

[] luke 11:28, please Mihai Marius mariusmih71 at yahoo.com
Wed Sep 16 17:24:28 EDT 2009

 

[] Luke 17: 20-21 [] luke 11:28, please Hello,My name is Marius Mihai and I`m from Romania. I have study three bibles: protestant, orthodox versus greek. Now, my study has stoped because the word “menoun” from the verset 28 on the 11 chapter of Luke gospels. So, please help me: :menoun” is “rather” or “in-deed”, in english?please help me.God bless you!__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com

 

[] Luke 17: 20-21[] luke 11:28, please

[] luke 11:28, please Carl Conrad cwconrad2 at mac.com
Wed Sep 16 17:46:51 EDT 2009

 

[] luke 11:28, please [] luke 11:28, please On Sep 16, 2009, at 5:24 PM, Mihai Marius wrote:> Hello,> My name is Marius Mihai and I`m from Romania. I have study three > bibles: protestant, orthodox versus greek. Now, my study has stoped > because the word “menoun” from the verset 28 on the 11 chapter of > Luke gospels. So, please help me: :menoun” is “rather” or “in-deed”, > in english?Text:Luke 11:28 αὐτὸς δὲ εἶπεν· μενοῦν μακάριοι οἱ ἀκούοντες τὸν λόγον τοῦ θεοῦ καὶ φυλάσσοντες.[AUTOS DE EIPEN· MENOUN MAKARIOI hOI AKOUONTES TON LOGON TOU QEOU KAI FULASSONTES.]BDAG:μενοῦν (also μὲν οὖν [MEN OUN) Lk 11:28 (for negative s. οὐ μὲν οὖν [OU MEN OUN]) and μενοῦνγε (also μενοῦν γε), particles used esp. in answers, to emphasize or correct (B-D-F §450, 4; Rob. 1151f), even—contrary to earlier Gk. usage—at the beginning of a clause (Phryn. 342 Lob. [322 R.]) rather, on the contrary (Soph., Aj. 1363; Pla., Crito 44b; X., Cyr. 8, 3, 37) Lk 11:28 v.l. Indeed Ro 10:18. ἀλλὰ μενοῦνγε [ALLA MENOUNGE] more than that Phil 3:8. μενοῦνγε σὺ τίς εἶ . . . [MENOUNGE SU TIS EI … ]; on the contrary, who are you . . . ? (or, who in the world are you to [take issue with God]?) Ro 9:20.—M-M.Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics, Washington University (Retired)

 

[] luke 11:28, please[] luke 11:28, please

[] luke 11:28, please Edward Andrews edandrews at roadrunner.com
Wed Sep 16 18:02:37 EDT 2009

 

[] luke 11:28, please [] please explain Mihai:?????? is literally “indeed,” but rendered “rather.” It should not be understood as negating the previous statement of the woman in verse 27, but should be viewed as [corrective] “indeed therefore.” In other words: Jesus is is concurring with “indeed,” yet stressing something of more relevance still: “Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and keep it!” While Mary is blessed in that she was afforded the opportunity of giving birth to and raising Jesus, but her greater blessing comes because she had heard the Word of God and kept it.Generally speaking if Luke wanted to refute what the woman had said, he would have used ???? ???? ???? [ouchi lego hymin]. – see Luke 12:51; 13: 3, 5. Edward Andrews —– Original Message —– From: Mihai Marius To: at lists.ibiblio.org Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2009 5:24 PM Subject: [] luke 11:28, please Hello, My name is Marius Mihai and I`m from Romania. I have study three bibles: protestant, orthodox versus greek. Now, my study has stoped because the word “menoun” from the verset 28 on the 11 chapter of Luke gospels. So, please help me: :menoun” is “rather” or “in-deed”, in english? please help me. God bless you! __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around http://mail.yahoo.com — home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.org http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/

 

[] luke 11:28, please[] please explain

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