Luke 5:4

Luke 4:5 Rick Strelan rick.strelan at mailbox.uq.edu.au
Fri May 7 02:52:01 EDT 1999

Hebrews 11:1 Heb 2:17 My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar orvocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggeststhat both characters have the ability to step outside the limits of timeand space.Very happy to receive commnents off-list is this is thought to be outsidethe acceptable scope [but it is only a STIGMH]RickDr Rick StrelanStudies in ReligionUniversity of QueenslandAustralia 4072

Hebrews 11:1Heb 2:17

Luke 4:5 Rick Strelan rick.strelan at mailbox.uq.edu.au
Fri May 7 02:52:01 EDT 1999

Hebrews 11:1 Heb 2:17 My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar orvocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggeststhat both characters have the ability to step outside the limits of timeand space.Very happy to receive commnents off-list is this is thought to be outsidethe acceptable scope [but it is only a STIGMH]RickDr Rick StrelanStudies in ReligionUniversity of QueenslandAustralia 4072

Hebrews 11:1Heb 2:17

Luke 4:5 Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at mailhost.chi.ameritech.net
Fri May 7 19:24:44 EDT 1999

Relationship between the Alands Any suggestions on a good NT Lexicon? Rick Strelan wrote:> My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar or> vocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk> 4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggests> that both characters have the ability to step outside the limits of time> and space.> > Very happy to receive commnents off-list is this is thought to be outside> the acceptable scope [but it is only a STIGMH]Luke’s EN STIGMi CRONOU seems to be an attempt to note the visionary character of theexperience. But note that quick ascents into, or more precisely, guided tours of,the upper realms through the agency of a heavenly being with their consequent visionsof all that lies below the upper realms was a theme of apocalyptic literature. Andin the light of this, the phrase does not suggest that Jesus had the ability yousuggest, only the Devil. Also keep in mind that Paul claims to have known someone(himself?) who had made a (presumably guided) journey into the third heaven, andthere is no hint that the person in question is more than human.But with these observations we move beyond the bounds of –Jeffrey B. Gibson7423 N. Sheridan Road #2AChicago, Illinois 60626e-mail jgibson000 at ameritech.net

Relationship between the AlandsAny suggestions on a good NT Lexicon?

Luke 4:5 Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at mailhost.chi.ameritech.net
Fri May 7 19:24:44 EDT 1999

Relationship between the Alands Any suggestions on a good NT Lexicon? Rick Strelan wrote:> My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar or> vocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk> 4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggests> that both characters have the ability to step outside the limits of time> and space.> > Very happy to receive commnents off-list is this is thought to be outside> the acceptable scope [but it is only a STIGMH]Luke’s EN STIGMi CRONOU seems to be an attempt to note the visionary character of theexperience. But note that quick ascents into, or more precisely, guided tours of,the upper realms through the agency of a heavenly being with their consequent visionsof all that lies below the upper realms was a theme of apocalyptic literature. Andin the light of this, the phrase does not suggest that Jesus had the ability yousuggest, only the Devil. Also keep in mind that Paul claims to have known someone(himself?) who had made a (presumably guided) journey into the third heaven, andthere is no hint that the person in question is more than human.But with these observations we move beyond the bounds of –Jeffrey B. Gibson7423 N. Sheridan Road #2AChicago, Illinois 60626e-mail jgibson000 at ameritech.net

Relationship between the AlandsAny suggestions on a good NT Lexicon?

Luke 1:54 Brian Swedburg brian at discoveryhills.org
Wed Oct 6 17:01:15 EDT 1999

KATA PANTA, DIA PANTA LINOKALAMHN Greetings. I am translating Luke 1:39-55 and am stumped by…1. the function of and syntactic relation of the aor pass inf”MNHSQHNAI” to the rest of v 54,2. as well as troubled by the meaning of the genetive use of ELEOUS.Help!BrianM.A.E.T. Student.

KATA PANTA, DIA PANTALINOKALAMHN

Luke 1:54 Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Wed Oct 6 20:27:56 EDT 1999

Titus 2:2 KATA PANTA, DIA PANTA At 1:01 PM -0800 10/6/99, Brian Swedburg wrote:>Greetings.> I am translating Luke 1:39-55 and am stumped by…> >1. the function of and syntactic relation of the aor pass inf>“MNHSQHNAI” to the rest of v 54,> >2. as well as troubled by the meaning of the genetive use of ELEOUS.> >Help!In Lk 1:54 we have a citation from the LXX, and this is no ordinaryclassical Greek; I think that(1) MNSQHNAI here is an infinitive of purpose (or perhaps result; infancier Greek you might have expected an introductory hWSTE here) withoutany introductory construction, dependent upon ANTELABETO ISRAHL PAIDOSAUTOU. Note, moreover, that although you can call it a passive in the sensethat it has “passive deponent” forms in the aorist, this is hardly passive;the verb is middle MIMNHSKOMAI; I would simply say that the -QH- formssupply the aorist and future of this middle-voice verb. “He has helpfullytaken hold of his child Israel, so as to recollect once again (his)compassion (for Israel).”(2) MIMNHSKOMAI is one of those verbs of mental activity that take a directobject (or “direct complement,” if you prefer that language) in thegenitive. It’s actually a partitive genitive originally: “make recollectionof …” The sense will be, I think, “to recollect once again (his)compassion”Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics/Washington UniversityOne Brookings Drive/St. Louis, MO, USA 63130/(314) 935-4018Home: 7222 Colgate Ave./St. Louis, MO 63130/(314) 726-5649cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

Titus 2:2KATA PANTA, DIA PANTA

Luke 5:4 Kenneth Litwak javajedi2 at yahoo.com
Thu Jun 14 00:59:20 EDT 2001

Hellenistic / Patristic Greek texts on the web? Luke 5:4 At the start of Luke 5:4 we readhWS DE EPAUSATO LALWN,…. My question is this. Should we read this as”As he was speaking, he stoppedro asAs he stopped speaking?Is there any grammatical rule that would dictate whichit should be? Also, if the latter translation iscorect, what kind of construction is the verb +participle, with no other modifiers or anything elseseparating them or connecting them? For Carl’sbenefit, I’m not contending this is bad Greek. Itseems that long ago I posted something about aconstruction that seemed bizarre to me and foreverafter, it seems I’m doomed to be perceived as beingsuspicous of the grammar. I’m actually come to holdthe exact opposite position, and am guessing that justas modern U.S. culture does completely bogusgrammatical constructions like “it’s this way, not,”Greek writers probably felt liberty to do whateverthey wished to do as well. I simply want some rule ofthumb to understand the construction. Thanks.Ken__________________________________________________Do You Yahoo!?Spot the hottest trends in music, movies, and more.http://buzz.yahoo.com/

Hellenistic / Patristic Greek texts on the web?Luke 5:4

Luke 5:4 Carl W. Conrad cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu
Thu Jun 14 08:24:30 EDT 2001

Luke 5:4 KJV English At 9:59 PM -0700 6/13/01, Kenneth Litwak wrote:>At the start of Luke 5:4 we read>hWS DE EPAUSATO LALWN,….> > My question is this. Should we read this as”>As he was speaking, he stopped>ro as>As he stopped speaking?>Is there any grammatical rule that would dictate which>it should be? Also, if the latter translation is>corect, what kind of construction is the verb +>participle, with no other modifiers or anything else>separating them or connecting them? For Carl’s>benefit, I’m not contending this is bad Greek. It>seems that long ago I posted something about a>construction that seemed bizarre to me and forever>after, it seems I’m doomed to be perceived as being>suspicous of the grammar. I’m actually come to hold>the exact opposite position, and am guessing that just>as modern U.S. culture does completely bogus>grammatical constructions like “it’s this way, not,”>Greek writers probably felt liberty to do whatever>they wished to do as well. I simply want some rule of>thumb to understand the construction. Thanks.Ken, this falls into a category of what I learned and have taught as the”supplementary” use of a participle with a verb that functions as anauxiliary of sorts. In Classical Attic, a few such common verbs areTUGCANW, FQANW, KINDUNEUOMAI, FAINOMAI, ARCOMAI (‘begin’), PAUOMAI. Youneed to look at in the grammar books under participial usage.Here I’d understand hWS DE EPAUSATO LALWN as “And when he had finishedspeaking … (lit. ‘ceased speaking’)”You might check out Smyth at Perseus, ##2094ff on “The SupplementaryParticiple”. Wallace (GGBB) has a discussion of what he prefers to call”Complementary Participle” (but it’s the same thing) on page 646 {I’m nottransliterating the Greek; I know it will appear as gobbledygook, but youcan check the Greek text for yourself):=================================4. Complementarya. DefinitionThe complementary participle completes the thought of another verb.It is especially used in combination with a verb suggesting a consummative(e.g., “stop” [pau/w]) or sometimes a progressive (e.g., “continue”[e™pime÷nw]) idea.81 The idiom is rare in the NT.b. IllustrationsMatt 11:1 o¢te e™te÷lesen oJ Ihsouvß diata¿sswnwhen Jesus finished teachingActs 5:42 oujk e™pau/onto dida¿skonteß kai« eujaggelizo/menoi toncristo/n Ihsouvnthey did not cease teaching and proclaiming that the Messiah was JesusActs 12:16 oJ Pe÷troß e™pe÷menen krou/wnPeter kept on knockingEph 1:16 ouj pau/omai eujcaristw×nI do not cease being thankfulCf. also Matt 6:16; Luke 5:4; John 8:7 (v.l.); Acts 6:13; 13:10;20:31; 21:32; Gal 6:9; Col 1:9; 2 Thess 3:13; Heb 10:2.– Carl W. ConradDepartment of Classics/Washington UniversityHome: 7222 Colgate Ave./St. Louis, MO 63130/(314) 726-5649cwconrad at artsci.wustl.eduWWW: http://www.artsci.wustl.edu/~cwconrad/

Luke 5:4KJV English

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14 thoughts on “Luke 5:4

  1. Troy Day says:

    Ricky Grimsley Randal W Deese My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar or vocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggests that both of them have the ability to step outside the limits of time and space.

  2. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    Ricky Grimsley Randal W Deese My question raises not a Greek linguistic problem [in terms of grammar or vocabulary], but certainly one of meaning! What do people understand by Lk4:5 when Satan shows Jesus all the kingdoms EN STIGMi CRONOU? This suggests that both of them have the ability to step outside the limits of time and space.

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