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1 Timothy 1:19

NAUAGEO in 1 Timothy 1:19

First, the Greek:

ECWV PISTIN KAI AGAQHN SUNEIDHSIN HN TINES APWSAMENOI PERI THN PISTIN ENAUAGHSAN

then the English:

keeping faith and a good conscience, which some have rejected and suffered shipwreck in regard to their faith. [NASB]

then the question:

A check of online lexicons simply says that NAUAGEO means 1. literally, to shipwreck 2. figuratively, to be ruined

There are certainly many choices of Greek words that can mean “ruin” or “destruction”, not only NAUAGEO. Any word other than the most obvious choice leads us to ask the question “Why did the author choose this word?”

“Shipwreck” isn’t the word I’d use, to say that somebody has messed up his life. Maybe there’s a shade of meaning that escapes us in English? (Or, as my daughter suggests, maybe Paul was thinking of his own shipwreck experiences!)

Does anyone know of any figurative uses of NAUAGEO outside of 1 Timothy 1:19? I’m hoping that some poor soul used it some time in antiquity, and his metaphorical shipwreck, (ruin, destruction . . . ) will be illustrative for us.

Thank you!

Ted Shoemaker

Success is easy only if you’re a weeds farmer.

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