Philippians- 3:13

jweaks wrote:
May 15th, 2017, 12:05 pm
Thoughts?
I think that the difference between λανθάνω and ἐπιλανθάνομαι is similar to the difference between ποθέω and ἐπιποθέω Statistics: Posted by Stephen Hughes — May 17th, 2017, 10:58 am
Context is important here.
Phil 3 wrote:12 Οὐχ ὅτι ἤδη ἔλαβον ἢ ἤδη τετελείωμαι, διώκω δὲ εἰ καὶ καταλάβω, ἐφ’ ᾧ καὶ κατελήμφθην ὑπὸ Χριστοῦ. 13 ἀδελφοί, ἐγὼ ἐμαυτὸν οὐ λογίζομαι κατειληφέναι· ἓν δέ, τὰ μὲν ὀπίσω ἐπιλανθανόμενος τοῖς δὲ ἔμπροσθεν ἐπεκτεινόμενος, 14 κατὰ σκοπὸν διώκω εἰς τὸ βραβεῖον τῆς ἄνω κλήσεως τοῦ θεοῦ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ. 15 ὅσοι οὖν τέλειοι, τοῦτο φρονῶμεν· καὶ εἴ τι ἑτέρως φρονεῖτε, καὶ τοῦτο ὁ θεὸς ὑμῖν ἀποκαλύψει· 16 πλὴν εἰς ὃ ἐφθάσαμεν, τῷ αὐτῷ στοιχεῖν.
I read this as a runner who does not look back, but looks forward toward the goal, a goal he has not yet reached. I think τὰ μὲν ὀπίσω ἐπιλανθανόμενος / τοῖς δὲ ἔμπροσθεν ἐπεκτεινόμενος should be read in this context. BDAG suggests that for this verse, it has the sense 'disregard, put out of mind'. Perhaps 'ignoring what is behind' or 'disregarding what is behind'? Disregarding fits the physical analogy, meaning quite literally 'not looking'. In the Acts of Paul, it may have a similar sense in the phrase ἐπιλάθου τοῦ πλούτου καὶ τοῦ κάλλους, though you would probably translate it differently into English. Statistics: Posted by Jonathan Robie — May 15th, 2017, 2:16 pm
Interesting is the complete lack of lexical parallel in Isaiah 43 LXX. I had assumed there would be. "Μὴ μνημονεύετε τὰ πρῶτα καὶ τὰ ἀρχαῖα μὴ συλλογίζεσθε." — Ἠσαΐας 43·18 Statistics: Posted by jweaks — May 15th, 2017, 12:59 pm
"ἓν δέ, τὰ μὲν ὀπίσω ἐπιλανθανόμενος τοῖς δὲ ἔμπροσθεν ἐπεκτεινόμενος," — Φιλιππησίους 3·13 In terms of how best to translate, it seem to me in English we don't say, "forget the things behind us", we say things like, "don't dwell on the past", "not be nostalgic", "no reminisce about things in the past". The verse istm means "I will not dwell on past things, but focus forward." I'm playing around with: "looking behind" or "focusing/dwelling on what's behind/the past" "dwell" is an interesting semantic domain. It surely includes what you are "mindful" of/remembering (ie. not forgetting). The only translations I found that don't use "forget" are: "I don't look back": God's Word (GW)/Names of God Bible (NOG) "I leave the past behind": JBPhillips "I'm not turning back": The Message "I’m leaving my old life behind": The Voice Thoughts? Statistics: Posted by jweaks — May 15th, 2017, 12:05 pm

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4 thoughts on “Philippians- 3:13

  1. Nice read thanks. Maybe include not being double minded? And having a “single eye?” as Jesus says. Wholly devoted to Christ. One passion with dillegence and purpose? To serve him. Know him. Seek him. Love him.

  2. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    I read this as a runner who does not look back, but looks forward toward the goal, a goal he has not yet reached. I think τὰ μὲν ὀπίσω ἐπιλανθανόμενος / τοῖς δὲ ἔμπροσθεν ἐπεκτεινόμενος should be read in this context. BDAG suggests that for this verse, it has the sense ‘disregard, put out of mind’. Perhaps ‘ignoring what is behind’ or ‘disregarding what is behind’? Disregarding fits the physical analogy, meaning quite literally ‘not looking’.

    1. I can see that. I looked at every translation I could find. They all had forgetting. But it is good to remember at times, “the rock from which were hewn.”
      I think with English we have lost some of the power and impact of words. i.e. fifty shades of grey. With these days full of slang English seems like a moving Target. It’s worse in the halls of higher learning. Maybe God will restore the value of words in the hearts of honest sincere men. I think for the most part progressives have watered down the impact of words like truth, sin and repentance. And some of the language has fallen out of use. “They were ‘pricked’ to the heart.” “It’s hard to kick against the ‘goads'”
      Words mean little if the Holy Spirit doesn’t bring them alive to us. The Bible says these three agree the Father, the Word, the Holy Spirit. When you hear most people talk I don’t think there is much the Holy Spirit can agree with.
      I do appreciate the group. I’ve learned quite a bit. And “fleshed out” some ideas. So thank you.

  3. Troy Day Troy Day says:

    Φιλιππησίους 3·13 In terms of how best to translate, it seem to me in English we don’t say, “forget the things behind us”, we say things like, “don’t dwell on the past”, “not be nostalgic”, “no reminisce about things in the past”. The verse istm means “I will not dwell on past things, but focus forward.” I’m playing around with: “looking behind” or “focusing/dwelling on what’s behind/the past” “dwell” is an interesting semantic domain. It surely includes what you are “mindful” of/remembering (ie. not forgetting). The only translations I found that don’t use “forget” are: “I don’t look back”: God’s Word (GW)/Names of God Bible (NOG) “I leave the past behind”: JBPhillips “I’m not turning back”: The Message “I’m leaving my old life behind”: The Voice Thoughts?

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