Revelation 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Stephen Douglas dr.elwinransom at gmail.com
Wed May 10 12:58:42 EDT 2006

 

[] Thank you – Re: Homer [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 I’m having a hard time deciding what to make of this passage. It says,(1) KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hOS KRUSTALLONEKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU (2) EN MESW THS PLATEIASAUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS POIOUN KARPOUS DWDEKAKATA MHNA hEKASTON APODIDOUN TON KARPON AUTOU KAI TA FULLA TOU XULOU EISQERAPEIAN TWN EQNWN.Modern translators or more likely to construe the phrase “EN MESW THSPLATEIAS AUTHS” in verse 2 with POTAMON in verse 1. I don’t suppose there’sany other way to take the phrase “KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN” thanas describing the Tree of Life, but this spawns my questions:1) Should we take the XULON as manifestly singular or should we understandit as referencing more than one tree, as a class (this sort of tree grows oneither side of the river)? This seems problematic to me, not only becausethe singular identification of the XULON here and in the following phrase(along with the singular pronoun AUTOU) undeniably give the impression oftrue singularity, but especially because the presumable allusion to the Treeof Life in the Garden of Eden would definitely suggest a single tree.2) This leads to this question. How can one tree grow on two sides of ariver, unless it somehow bridges it? Is this tree seen as naturally beingsplit near the ground so that the roots are split over the tree? Is theresome sort of vegetation that does this that XULON may refer to? Does XULONin Koine ever refer to anything besides what we’d consider a tree (a bush,etc.)?Thanks for your help!Stephen Douglas, Perry, GAOn 5/10/06, -request at lists.ibiblio.org <-request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:> > Send mailing list submissions to> at lists.ibiblio.org> > To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> or, via email, send a message with subject or body ‘help’ to> -request at lists.ibiblio.org> > You can reach the person managing the list at> -owner at lists.ibiblio.org> > When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific> than “Re: Contents of digest…”> > > Today’s Topics:> > 1. Re: Homer (gfsomsel at juno.com)> 2. Re: Homer (Carl W. Conrad)> 3. Re: Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List (Joseph Weaks)> 4. Re: Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List (Carl W. Conrad)> 5. Thank you – Re: Homer (Ed Garcia)> > > ———————————————————————-> > Message: 1> Date: Tue, 9 May 2006 16:25:05 GMT> From: “gfsomsel at juno.com” <gfsomsel at juno.com>> Subject: Re: [] Homer> To: Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com> Cc: at lists.ibiblio.org> Message-ID: <20060509.092542.13636.1169332 at webmail50.lax.untd.com>> Content-Type: text/plain> > Back up a little.> EPEI hH POLU FERTERON ESTIN> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENTOS KAI PLOUTON AFUCEIN.> > Then much better is it> that we go home with our beaked ships, nor do I intend,> while being dishonored here, goods and wealth to acquire.> > > george> gfsomsel> _________> > — “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com> wrote:> Hello to the group.> > In order to improve our overall understanding of Greek some friends and> I have taken a break from Koine and are working through Clyde Pharr’s> Homeric Greek for Beginners. But we are puzzled about a certain passage.> In Pharr’s book they are lines 169b-171 of the Iliad.> > Below are the lines in question, I hope I have presented them correctly.> > > > —————————- EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN> > OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW> > ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AQENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.> > The section that puzzles us is the following: OUDE S’ OIW ENQAD’ ATIMOS> EWN> > We consulted several translations and what puzzles us is that most seem> to ignore the OUDE and though we can translate OIW (hopefully correctly)> as “I think” or “consider”. We don’t see either “I think”, “consider” or> any words like them in any of the translations we consulted. One typical> translation we consulted was by Samuel Butler “it will be much better> for me to return home with my ships, for I will not stay here> dishonoured to gather gold and substance for you.”> > Any help or guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.> > Ed Garcia> Kansas> > This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely> for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained> herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright> or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public> information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal> or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,> be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information> is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil> penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the> sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your> computer. Thank you for your cooperation.> FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > > > ——————————> > Message: 2> Date: Tue, 9 May 2006 13:40:46 -0400> From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>> Subject: Re: [] Homer> To: gfsomsel at juno.com> Cc: Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com, at lists.ibiblio.org> Message-ID: <E9CFB2C5-50F5-414A-BD7A-553D0B578675 at artsci.wustl.edu>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed> > > On May 9, 2006, at 12:25 PM, gfsomsel at juno.com wrote:> > > Back up a little.> > EPEI hH POLU FERTERON ESTIN> > OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW> > ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENTOS KAI PLOUTON AFUCEIN.> >> > Then much better is it> > that we go home with our beaked ships, nor do I intend,> > while being dishonored here, goods and wealth to acquire.> > correction of transcription:> > EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S(OI) OIW> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.> > This is part of Achilles’ angry response to Agamemnon:> > “For indeed far bettter is it> to go home with (our) beaked ships, nor do I intend> while being without honor here to heap up riches and wealth for you.”> > OUDE construes with OIW … AFUXEIN: “nor do I think (that I> will) … to heap up” This is an instance of OIW taking complementary> infinitive, the future infinitive AFUXEIN. The OUDE is simply the> equivalent of KAI OU. Note also that here the elided S’ is not for SE> but rather for the dative SOI.> > > _________> >> > — “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com> wrote:> > Hello to the group.> >> > In order to improve our overall understanding of Greek some friends> > and> > I have taken a break from Koine and are working through Clyde Pharr’s> > Homeric Greek for Beginners. But we are puzzled about a certain> > passage.> > In Pharr’s book they are lines 169b-171 of the Iliad.> >> > Below are the lines in question, I hope I have presented them> > correctly.> >> >> >> > —————————- EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN> >> > OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW> >> > ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AQENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.> >> > The section that puzzles us is the following: OUDE S’ OIW ENQAD’> > ATIMOS> > EWN> >> > We consulted several translations and what puzzles us is that most> > seem> > to ignore the OUDE and though we can translate OIW (hopefully> > correctly)> > as “I think” or “consider”. We don’t see either “I think”,> > “consider” or> > any words like them in any of the translations we consulted. One> > typical> > translation we consulted was by Samuel Butler “it will be much better> > for me to return home with my ships, for I will not stay here> > dishonoured to gather gold and substance for you.”> >> > Any help or guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.> >> > Ed Garcia> > Kansas> >> > This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely> > for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained> > herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright> > or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public> > information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal> > or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,> > be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information> > is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil> > penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the> > sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your> > computer. Thank you for your cooperation.> > FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]> >> > —> > home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> > mailing list> > at lists.ibiblio.org> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >> > —> > home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> > mailing list> > at lists.ibiblio.org> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > > Carl W. Conrad> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243> cwconrad2 at mac.com> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/> > > > > ——————————> > Message: 3> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 02:32:06 -0500> From: Joseph Weaks <j.weaks at tcu.edu>> Subject: Re: [] Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List> To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>> Message-ID: <935229ecb07613d2b9807fc38f81b26c at tcu.edu>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed> > I must be misunderstanding the kind of list being discussed here. The> pdf file is not displaying for me, so can’t check. A LXX frequency list> takes a mere half a minute using a computer program such as Accordance.> Is this not the kind of thing we’re talking about:> http://stuwww.tcu.edu/~jweaks/files/LXXVocabFrequency.txt> It contains every word occurring 10 or more times, using Unicode Greek.> > Joe Weaks> http://macbiblioblog.blogspot.com> > On May 3, 2006, at 1:59 PM, Carl W. Conrad wrote:> > Rod Decker … completed a LXX Vocabulary list that may be> > helpful to some ers. Here’s his description; the URL follows> > below:> >> > “LXX Greek vocabulary list by frequency. One of the more frequent> > questions I’ve been asked over the past few years is, “Where can I> > find a vocabulary frequency list for the Septuagint?” I’ve not been> > able to point to any such tool, so eventually I got around to making> > a beginning attempt at offering such a tool…> > > > ——————————> > Message: 4> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 05:47:13 -0400> From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>> Subject: Re: [] Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List> To: Joseph Weaks <j.weaks at tcu.edu>> Cc: < at lists.ibiblio.org>> Message-ID: <D5A554FE-F986-44F6-BC5D-626992070D8A at artsci.wustl.edu>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed> > Joe, I had no trouble downloading and displaying Rod’s list; it’s> exactly like your list, although the numbers you cite from Accordance> tend to be somewhat higher and your list is exhaustive down to 10+> words while his goes down only to words used 100+ times in the GNT.> > On May 10, 2006, at 3:32 AM, Joseph Weaks wrote:> > > I must be misunderstanding the kind of list being discussed here. The> > pdf file is not displaying for me, so can’t check. A LXX frequency> > list> > takes a mere half a minute using a computer program such as> > Accordance.> > Is this not the kind of thing we’re talking about:> > http://stuwww.tcu.edu/~jweaks/files/LXXVocabFrequency.txt> > It contains every word occurring 10 or more times, using Unicode> > Greek.> >> > Joe Weaks> > http://macbiblioblog.blogspot.com> >> > On May 3, 2006, at 1:59 PM, Carl W. Conrad wrote:> >> Rod Decker … completed a LXX Vocabulary list that may be> >> helpful to some ers. Here’s his description; the URL follows> >> below:> >>> >> “LXX Greek vocabulary list by frequency. One of the more frequent> >> questions I’ve been asked over the past few years is, “Where can I> >> find a vocabulary frequency list for the Septuagint?” I’ve not been> >> able to point to any such tool, so eventually I got around to making> >> a beginning attempt at offering such a tool…> >> > —> > home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> > mailing list> > at lists.ibiblio.org> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > > Carl W. Conrad> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243> cwconrad2 at mac.com> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/> > > > > ——————————> > Message: 5> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 09:39:32 -0500> From: “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com>> Subject: [] Thank you – Re: Homer> To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>> Message-ID:> <DFA69C10957E914F8F3331BE941A36B5029E934A at srvtopeka15.FHLB10.COM>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii”> > To George and Carl,> > Thank you for responding to my question concerning Homer’s Iliad. You> were both a great help. This list is a great resource.> > Ed> Topeka, Kansas> > This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely> for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained> herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright> or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public> information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal> or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,> be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information> is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil> penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the> sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your> computer. Thank you for your cooperation.> FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]> > > > ——————————> > _______________________________________________> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > End of Digest, Vol 41, Issue 10> ***************************************>

 

[] Thank you – Re: Homer[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 gfsomsel at juno.com gfsomsel at juno.com
Wed May 10 13:28:30 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 An embedded and charset-unspecified text was scrubbed…Name: not availableUrl: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail//attachments/20060510/4d25170c/attachment.pl

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Curtis Hinson curtis at curtishinson.com
Wed May 10 13:36:35 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 What encoding is your Hebrew in George? It’s not Unicode or ISO Hebrew.ואיבה אשית בינךובין האשה וביןזרעך ובין זרעההוא ישופך ראשואתה תשופנו עקב׃Genesis 3:15 5 wü´êbâ ´äšît Bênkä ûbên hä´iššâ ûbên zar`ákä ûbên zar`äh hû´ yüšûpkä rö´š wü´aTTâ Tüšûpennû `äqëb sBless the NameCurtis Hinsongfsomsel at juno.com wrote the following on 5/10/2006 12:28 PM:> I think what we have here is a Semitism. Take Gen 3.15 in Heb for example> <!–StartFragment–>> W:)”YBfH )f$iYT B.YN:Kf W.B”N Ha)i$.fH> Painfully literally: “I will put enmity between you and betwen the woman”.> I wouldn’t try to visualize a tree on both sides of the river.> > george> gfsomsel> _________> > — “Stephen Douglas” <dr.elwinransom at gmail.com> wrote:> I’m having a hard time deciding what to make of this passage. It says,> > (1) KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hOS KRUSTALLON> EKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU (2) EN MESW THS PLATEIAS> AUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS POIOUN KARPOUS DWDEKA> KATA MHNA hEKASTON APODIDOUN TON KARPON AUTOU KAI TA FULLA TOU XULOU EIS> QERAPEIAN TWN EQNWN.> > Modern translators or more likely to construe the phrase “EN MESW THS> PLATEIAS AUTHS” in verse 2 with POTAMON in verse 1. I don’t suppose there’s> any other way to take the phrase “KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN” than> as describing the Tree of Life, but this spawns my questions:> > 1) Should we take the XULON as manifestly singular or should we understand> it as referencing more than one tree, as a class (this sort of tree grows on> either side of the river)? This seems problematic to me, not only because> the singular identification of the XULON here and in the following phrase> (along with the singular pronoun AUTOU) undeniably give the impression of> true singularity, but especially because the presumable allusion to the Tree> of Life in the Garden of Eden would definitely suggest a single tree.> > 2) This leads to this question. How can one tree grow on two sides of a> river, unless it somehow bridges it? Is this tree seen as naturally being> split near the ground so that the roots are split over the tree? Is there> some sort of vegetation that does this that XULON may refer to? Does XULON> in Koine ever refer to anything besides what we’d consider a tree (a bush,> etc.)?> > Thanks for your help!> Stephen Douglas, Perry, GA> > On 5/10/06, -request at lists.ibiblio.org <> -request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:> >> Send mailing list submissions to>> at lists.ibiblio.org>> >> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body ‘help’ to>> -request at lists.ibiblio.org>> >> You can reach the person managing the list at>> -owner at lists.ibiblio.org>> >> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific>> than “Re: Contents of digest…”>> >> >> Today’s Topics:>> >> 1. Re: Homer (gfsomsel at juno.com)>> 2. Re: Homer (Carl W. Conrad)>> 3. Re: Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List (Joseph Weaks)>> 4. Re: Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List (Carl W. Conrad)>> 5. Thank you – Re: Homer (Ed Garcia)>> >> >> ———————————————————————->> >> Message: 1>> Date: Tue, 9 May 2006 16:25:05 GMT>> From: “gfsomsel at juno.com” <gfsomsel at juno.com>>> Subject: Re: [] Homer>> To: Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com>> Cc: at lists.ibiblio.org>> Message-ID: <20060509.092542.13636.1169332 at webmail50.lax.untd.com>>> Content-Type: text/plain>> >> Back up a little.>> EPEI hH POLU FERTERON ESTIN>> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW>> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENTOS KAI PLOUTON AFUCEIN.>> >> Then much better is it>> that we go home with our beaked ships, nor do I intend,>> while being dishonored here, goods and wealth to acquire.>> >> >> george>> gfsomsel>> _________>> >> — “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com> wrote:>> Hello to the group.>> >> In order to improve our overall understanding of Greek some friends and>> I have taken a break from Koine and are working through Clyde Pharr’s>> Homeric Greek for Beginners. But we are puzzled about a certain passage.>> In Pharr’s book they are lines 169b-171 of the Iliad.>> >> Below are the lines in question, I hope I have presented them correctly.>> >> >> >> —————————- EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN>> >> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW>> >> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AQENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.>> >> The section that puzzles us is the following: OUDE S’ OIW ENQAD’ ATIMOS>> EWN>> >> We consulted several translations and what puzzles us is that most seem>> to ignore the OUDE and though we can translate OIW (hopefully correctly)>> as “I think” or “consider”. We don’t see either “I think”, “consider” or>> any words like them in any of the translations we consulted. One typical>> translation we consulted was by Samuel Butler “it will be much better>> for me to return home with my ships, for I will not stay here>> dishonoured to gather gold and substance for you.”>> >> Any help or guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.>> >> Ed Garcia>> Kansas>> >> This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely>> for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained>> herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright>> or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public>> information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal>> or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,>> be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information>> is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil>> penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the>> sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your>> computer. Thank you for your cooperation.>> FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]>> >>>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>> mailing list>> at lists.ibiblio.org>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>> >> >> >> ——————————>> >> Message: 2>> Date: Tue, 9 May 2006 13:40:46 -0400>> From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>>> Subject: Re: [] Homer>> To: gfsomsel at juno.com>> Cc: Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com, at lists.ibiblio.org>> Message-ID: <E9CFB2C5-50F5-414A-BD7A-553D0B578675 at artsci.wustl.edu>>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed>> >> >> On May 9, 2006, at 12:25 PM, gfsomsel at juno.com wrote:>> >> >>> Back up a little.>>> EPEI hH POLU FERTERON ESTIN>>> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW>>> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENTOS KAI PLOUTON AFUCEIN.>>> >>> Then much better is it>>> that we go home with our beaked ships, nor do I intend,>>> while being dishonored here, goods and wealth to acquire.>>> >> correction of transcription:>> >> EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN>> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S(OI) OIW>> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AFENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.>> >> This is part of Achilles’ angry response to Agamemnon:>> >> “For indeed far bettter is it>> to go home with (our) beaked ships, nor do I intend>> while being without honor here to heap up riches and wealth for you.”>> >> OUDE construes with OIW … AFUXEIN: “nor do I think (that I>> will) … to heap up” This is an instance of OIW taking complementary>> infinitive, the future infinitive AFUXEIN. The OUDE is simply the>> equivalent of KAI OU. Note also that here the elided S’ is not for SE>> but rather for the dative SOI.>> >> >>> _________>>> >>> — “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com> wrote:>>> Hello to the group.>>> >>> In order to improve our overall understanding of Greek some friends>>> and>>> I have taken a break from Koine and are working through Clyde Pharr’s>>> Homeric Greek for Beginners. But we are puzzled about a certain>>> passage.>>> In Pharr’s book they are lines 169b-171 of the Iliad.>>> >>> Below are the lines in question, I hope I have presented them>>> correctly.>>> >>> >>> >>> —————————- EPEI H POLU FERTERON ESTIN>>> >>> OIKAD’ IMEN SUN NHUSI KORWNISIN, OUDE S’ OIW>>> >>> ENQAD’ ATIMOS EWN AQENOS KAI PLOUTON AFUXEIN.>>> >>> The section that puzzles us is the following: OUDE S’ OIW ENQAD’>>> ATIMOS>>> EWN>>> >>> We consulted several translations and what puzzles us is that most>>> seem>>> to ignore the OUDE and though we can translate OIW (hopefully>>> correctly)>>> as “I think” or “consider”. We don’t see either “I think”,>>> “consider” or>>> any words like them in any of the translations we consulted. One>>> typical>>> translation we consulted was by Samuel Butler “it will be much better>>> for me to return home with my ships, for I will not stay here>>> dishonoured to gather gold and substance for you.”>>> >>> Any help or guidance would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.>>> >>> Ed Garcia>>> Kansas>>> >>> This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely>>> for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained>>> herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright>>> or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public>>> information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal>>> or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,>>> be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information>>> is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil>>> penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the>>> sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your>>> computer. Thank you for your cooperation.>>> FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]>>> >>>>>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>>> mailing list>>> at lists.ibiblio.org>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>>> >>>>>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>>> mailing list>>> at lists.ibiblio.org>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>>> >> Carl W. Conrad>> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)>> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243>> cwconrad2 at mac.com>> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/>> >> >> >> >> ——————————>> >> Message: 3>> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 02:32:06 -0500>> From: Joseph Weaks <j.weaks at tcu.edu>>> Subject: Re: [] Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List>> To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>>> Message-ID: <935229ecb07613d2b9807fc38f81b26c at tcu.edu>>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed>> >> I must be misunderstanding the kind of list being discussed here. The>> pdf file is not displaying for me, so can’t check. A LXX frequency list>> takes a mere half a minute using a computer program such as Accordance.>> Is this not the kind of thing we’re talking about:>> http://stuwww.tcu.edu/~jweaks/files/LXXVocabFrequency.txt>> It contains every word occurring 10 or more times, using Unicode Greek.>> >> Joe Weaks>> http://macbiblioblog.blogspot.com>> >> On May 3, 2006, at 1:59 PM, Carl W. Conrad wrote:>> >>> Rod Decker … completed a LXX Vocabulary list that may be>>> helpful to some ers. Here’s his description; the URL follows>>> below:>>> >>> “LXX Greek vocabulary list by frequency. One of the more frequent>>> questions I’ve been asked over the past few years is, “Where can I>>> find a vocabulary frequency list for the Septuagint?” I’ve not been>>> able to point to any such tool, so eventually I got around to making>>> a beginning attempt at offering such a tool…>>> >> >> ——————————>> >> Message: 4>> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 05:47:13 -0400>> From: “Carl W. Conrad” <cwconrad at artsci.wustl.edu>>> Subject: Re: [] Rod Decker’s LXX Vocabulary List>> To: Joseph Weaks <j.weaks at tcu.edu>>> Cc: < at lists.ibiblio.org>>> Message-ID: <D5A554FE-F986-44F6-BC5D-626992070D8A at artsci.wustl.edu>>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; delsp=yes; format=flowed>> >> Joe, I had no trouble downloading and displaying Rod’s list; it’s>> exactly like your list, although the numbers you cite from Accordance>> tend to be somewhat higher and your list is exhaustive down to 10+>> words while his goes down only to words used 100+ times in the GNT.>> >> On May 10, 2006, at 3:32 AM, Joseph Weaks wrote:>> >> >>> I must be misunderstanding the kind of list being discussed here. The>>> pdf file is not displaying for me, so can’t check. A LXX frequency>>> list>>> takes a mere half a minute using a computer program such as>>> Accordance.>>> Is this not the kind of thing we’re talking about:>>> http://stuwww.tcu.edu/~jweaks/files/LXXVocabFrequency.txt>>> It contains every word occurring 10 or more times, using Unicode>>> Greek.>>> >>> Joe Weaks>>> http://macbiblioblog.blogspot.com>>> >>> On May 3, 2006, at 1:59 PM, Carl W. Conrad wrote:>>> >>>> Rod Decker … completed a LXX Vocabulary list that may be>>>> helpful to some ers. Here’s his description; the URL follows>>>> below:>>>> >>>> “LXX Greek vocabulary list by frequency. One of the more frequent>>>> questions I’ve been asked over the past few years is, “Where can I>>>> find a vocabulary frequency list for the Septuagint?” I’ve not been>>>> able to point to any such tool, so eventually I got around to making>>>> a beginning attempt at offering such a tool…>>>> >>>>>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/>>> mailing list>>> at lists.ibiblio.org>>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>>> >> Carl W. Conrad>> Department of Classics, Washington University (Retired)>> 1989 Grindstaff Road/Burnsville, NC 28714/(828) 675-4243>> cwconrad2 at mac.com>> WWW: http://www.ioa.com/~cwconrad/>> >> >> >> >> ——————————>> >> Message: 5>> Date: Wed, 10 May 2006 09:39:32 -0500>> From: “Ed Garcia” <Ed.Garcia at FHLBTopeka.com>>> Subject: [] Thank you – Re: Homer>> To: < at lists.ibiblio.org>>> Message-ID:>> <DFA69C10957E914F8F3331BE941A36B5029E934A at srvtopeka15.FHLB10.COM>>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=”us-ascii”>> >> To George and Carl,>> >> Thank you for responding to my question concerning Homer’s Iliad. You>> were both a great help. This list is a great resource.>> >> Ed>> Topeka, Kansas>> >> This e-mail and any attachments are confidential and intended solely>> for the use of the intended recipient. The information contained>> herein may be legally privileged, proprietary or subject to copyright>> or trademark protection or may constitute material, non-public>> information regarding the sender, subject to protection under federal>> or state law or regulations. If you are not the intended recipient,>> be aware that any use, copying or distribution of this information>> is strictly prohibited and may subject you to criminal or civil>> penalties. If you received this e-mail in error, please notify the>> sender immediately by e-mail reply and delete this e-mail from your>> computer. Thank you for your cooperation.>> FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK OF TOPEKA [FHLBInfo at fhlbtopeka.com]>> >> >> >> ——————————>> >> _______________________________________________>> mailing list>> at lists.ibiblio.org>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>> >> End of Digest, Vol 41, Issue 10>> ***************************************>> >> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > — My local weather at the time of this email:68F (20C),Server status: 12:30:02 up 48 days, 13:18, 1 user, load average: 0.01, 0.02, 0.00

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Harold Holmyard hholmyard at ont.com
Wed May 10 13:44:54 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Dear Stephen,>I’m having a hard time deciding what to make of this passage. It says,> >(1) KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hOS KRUSTALLON>EKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU (2) EN MESW THS PLATEIAS>AUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS POIOUN KARPOUS DWDEKA>KATA MHNA hEKASTON APODIDOUN TON KARPON AUTOU KAI TA FULLA TOU XULOU EIS>QERAPEIAN TWN EQNWN.> >Modern translators or more likely to construe the phrase “EN MESW THS>PLATEIAS AUTHS” in verse 2 with POTAMON in verse 1. I don’t suppose there’s>any other way to take the phrase “KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN” than>as describing the Tree of Life, but this spawns my questions:> >1) Should we take the XULON as manifestly singular or should we understand>it as referencing more than one tree, as a class (this sort of tree grows on>either side of the river)? This seems problematic to me, not only because>the singular identification of the XULON here and in the following phrase>(along with the singular pronoun AUTOU) undeniably give the impression of>true singularity, but especially because the presumable allusion to the Tree>of Life in the Garden of Eden would definitely suggest a single tree.> >2) This leads to this question. How can one tree grow on two sides of a>river, unless it somehow bridges it? Is this tree seen as naturally being>split near the ground so that the roots are split over the tree? Is there>some sort of vegetation that does this that XULON may refer to? Does XULON>in Koine ever refer to anything besides what we’d consider a tree (a bush,> > HH: Another way to understand the words is that the tree is in “the midst” of the street and the river, with one on one side of the tree and the other on the other side. It may seem a bit redundant in English, but EN MESW may not be as clear as English “in between.” For MESOS conveys ideas like middle, midst, or center.Yours,Harold Holmyard

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Stephen Douglas dr.elwinransom at gmail.com
Wed May 10 14:00:36 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Let me get this straight: you’re saying that we should translate thissomething like: “In the midst of its street and the river, [one] on thisside and [one] on the other, [is] the tree of life…” This makes atremendous amount of sense, if it’s indeed valid (and I can’t see why not).This is really too simple (it embarrasses me for not catching it myself),and makes me wonder why there is such an overwhelming tendency to match thestring EN MESW THS PLATEIAS AUTHS with the river, which oddly splits a roaddown the middle with a river, and envisions a tree growing on two sides ofthe same river.Any other thoughts?On 5/10/06, Harold Holmyard <hholmyard at ont.com> wrote:> > Dear Stephen,> > >I’m having a hard time deciding what to make of this passage. It says,> >> >(1) KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hOS KRUSTALLON> >EKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU (2) EN MESW THS> PLATEIAS> >AUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS POIOUN KARPOUS> DWDEKA> >KATA MHNA hEKASTON APODIDOUN TON KARPON AUTOU KAI TA FULLA TOU XULOU EIS> >QERAPEIAN TWN EQNWN.> >> >Modern translators or more likely to construe the phrase “EN MESW THS> >PLATEIAS AUTHS” in verse 2 with POTAMON in verse 1. I don’t suppose> there’s> >any other way to take the phrase “KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN”> than> >as describing the Tree of Life, but this spawns my questions:> >> >1) Should we take the XULON as manifestly singular or should we> understand> >it as referencing more than one tree, as a class (this sort of tree grows> on> >either side of the river)? This seems problematic to me, not only> because> >the singular identification of the XULON here and in the following phrase> >(along with the singular pronoun AUTOU) undeniably give the impression of> >true singularity, but especially because the presumable allusion to the> Tree> >of Life in the Garden of Eden would definitely suggest a single tree.> >> >2) This leads to this question. How can one tree grow on two sides of a> >river, unless it somehow bridges it? Is this tree seen as naturally> being> >split near the ground so that the roots are split over the tree? Is> there> >some sort of vegetation that does this that XULON may refer to? Does> XULON> >in Koine ever refer to anything besides what we’d consider a tree (a> bush,> >> >> > HH: Another way to understand the words is that the tree is in “the> midst” of the street and the river, with one on one side of the tree and> the other on the other side. It may seem a bit redundant in English, but> EN MESW may not be as clear as English “in between.” For MESOS conveys> ideas like middle, midst, or center.> > Yours,> Harold Holmyard> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 gfsomsel at juno.com gfsomsel at juno.com
Wed May 10 14:13:36 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 An embedded and charset-unspecified text was scrubbed…Name: not availableUrl: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail//attachments/20060510/70de9def/attachment.pl

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Juan Stam juanstam at racsa.co.cr
Wed May 10 15:45:07 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Rev 22:2 seems to show influence of the “fruit trees of all kinds” besidethe eschatological life-giving stream of healing waters of Ezek 47:1-12,especially in the phrases “will grow on both banks of the river”, “everymonth they will bear (fruit)”, and “their fruit will serve for food andtheir leaves for healing”The Seer seems to have made a not entirely harmonious conflation of Ezk 47with the “tree of life” of Genesis 2Juan Stam, Costa Rica—–Original Message—–From: -bounces at lists.ibiblio.org[mailto:-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Stephen DouglasSent: Miércoles, 10 de Mayo de 2006 12:01 p.m.To: at lists.ibiblio.orgSubject: Re: [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2Let me get this straight: you’re saying that we should translate thissomething like: “In the midst of its street and the river, [one] on thisside and [one] on the other, [is] the tree of life…” This makes atremendous amount of sense, if it’s indeed valid (and I can’t see why not).This is really too simple (it embarrasses me for not catching it myself),and makes me wonder why there is such an overwhelming tendency to match thestring EN MESW THS PLATEIAS AUTHS with the river, which oddly splits a roaddown the middle with a river, and envisions a tree growing on two sides ofthe same river.Any other thoughts?On 5/10/06, Harold Holmyard <hholmyard at ont.com> wrote:> > Dear Stephen,> > >I’m having a hard time deciding what to make of this passage. It says,> >> >(1) KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hOS KRUSTALLON> >EKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU (2) EN MESW THS> PLATEIAS> >AUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS POIOUN KARPOUS> DWDEKA> >KATA MHNA hEKASTON APODIDOUN TON KARPON AUTOU KAI TA FULLA TOU XULOU EIS> >QERAPEIAN TWN EQNWN.> >> >Modern translators or more likely to construe the phrase “EN MESW THS> >PLATEIAS AUTHS” in verse 2 with POTAMON in verse 1. I don’t suppose> there’s> >any other way to take the phrase “KAI TOU POTAMOU ENEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN”> than> >as describing the Tree of Life, but this spawns my questions:> >> >1) Should we take the XULON as manifestly singular or should we> understand> >it as referencing more than one tree, as a class (this sort of tree grows> on> >either side of the river)? This seems problematic to me, not only> because> >the singular identification of the XULON here and in the following phrase> >(along with the singular pronoun AUTOU) undeniably give the impression of> >true singularity, but especially because the presumable allusion to the> Tree> >of Life in the Garden of Eden would definitely suggest a single tree.> >> >2) This leads to this question. How can one tree grow on two sides of a> >river, unless it somehow bridges it? Is this tree seen as naturally> being> >split near the ground so that the roots are split over the tree? Is> there> >some sort of vegetation that does this that XULON may refer to? Does> XULON> >in Koine ever refer to anything besides what we’d consider a tree (a> bush,> >> >> > HH: Another way to understand the words is that the tree is in “the> midst” of the street and the river, with one on one side of the tree and> the other on the other side. It may seem a bit redundant in English, but> EN MESW may not be as clear as English “in between.” For MESOS conveys> ideas like middle, midst, or center.> > Yours,> Harold Holmyard> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> — home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.orghttp://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Harold Holmyard hholmyard at ont.com
Wed May 10 15:59:22 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Juan Stam wrote:>Rev 22:2 seems to show influence of the “fruit trees of all kinds” beside>the eschatological life-giving stream of healing waters of Ezek 47:1-12,>especially in the phrases “will grow on both banks of the river”, “every>month they will bear (fruit)”, and “their fruit will serve for food and>their leaves for healing”> > HH: The phrase ENQEN KAI ENQEN in Ezek 47:7 could support taking the similar phrase in Rev 22:2 solely with the river. That’s a valid point.Yours,Harold Holmyard

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Stephen Douglas dr.elwinransom at gmail.com
Wed May 10 16:07:54 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 I’m not sure why I hadn’t run across that parallel before. This definitelybolsters the view that the singular XULON ZOES was representative of morethan one tree, presented individually in order to make an explicit allusionto Eden’s tree of life. Very interesting.Stephen DouglasOn 5/10/06, Harold Holmyard <hholmyard at ont.com> wrote:> Juan Stam wrote:> > >Rev 22:2 seems to show influence of the “fruit trees of all kinds” beside> >the eschatological life-giving stream of healing waters of Ezek 47:1-12,> >especially in the phrases “will grow on both banks of the river”, “every> >month they will bear (fruit)”, and “their fruit will serve for food and> >their leaves for healing”> >> >> > HH: The phrase ENQEN KAI ENQEN in Ezek 47:7 could support taking the> similar phrase in Rev 22:2 solely with the river. That’s a valid point.> > Yours,> Harold Holmyard>> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 gfsomsel at juno.com gfsomsel at juno.com
Wed May 10 16:20:17 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] Nouns sorted according to gender An embedded and charset-unspecified text was scrubbed…Name: not availableUrl: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail//attachments/20060510/fd2ff0a7/attachment.pl

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] Nouns sorted according to gender

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Harold R. Holmyard III hholmyard at ont.com
Wed May 10 16:29:02 EDT 2006

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 [] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2 Dear Stephen,Juan’s offered a good possibility for taking ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN just with the river, but I will say that the same phrase EN MESWi with two following genitive objects occurs in Rev 5:6, where HCSB translates: “between the throne and the four living creatures.” So starting the sentence at the beginning of verse 2 seems quite plausible if ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN can make sense with it. In Ezekiel 47:1 the vision starts as in Rev 22:1. That is, the water is simply pictured as coming out from a source, either the temple (Ezekiel) or the throne (Revelation). That is, in Ezekiel there is no statement of a pathway like a street for the water to flow down.>Let me get this straight: you’re saying that we should translate this>something like: “In the midst of its street and the river, [one] on this>side and [one] on the other, [is] the tree of life…”HH: Yes, that’s what I meant. Thanks.> This makes a>tremendous amount of sense, if it’s indeed valid (and I can’t see why not).HH: People seem to want to associate ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN with just the river. See the Weymouth NT, which in other respects is like the idea I presented:22:2On either side of the river, midway between it and the main street of the city, was the Tree of Life. It produced twelve kinds of fruit, yielding a fresh crop month by month, and the leaves of the tree served as medicine for the nations.HH: I cannot picture exactly what Weymouth had in mind and wonder if it’s logically possible. However, if you regard POTAMOU as a second genitive modifier of MESWi, then ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN could be adverbial modifiers of the whole prepositional phrase beginning with MESWi: “in between the street and the river on one side and the other is the tree of life.” That is equivalent to: “in between the street on one side and the river on the other is the tree of life.” The phrase ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN is not used elsewhere in the NT or the LXX, but the double use of ENQEN in Ezek 47:1 does not have to control exactly how the words are used in Revelation.HH: The author of Revelation was describing a vision shown to him by God, if we take him at his word. There is no necessary incorporation of Ezekiel 47, except in that God inspired both visions. That is, Revelation 22 does not have to be a literary reworking of Ezekiel 47, though both visions may have the same ultimate source.>This is really too simple (it embarrasses me for not catching it myself),>and makes me wonder why there is such an overwhelming tendency to match the>string EN MESW THS PLATEIAS AUTHS with the river, which oddly splits a road>down the middle with a river, and envisions a tree growing on two sides of>the same river.HH: Perhaps the tendency is due to Ezekiel 47. The KJV does not have it, but the KJV is difficult to understand. It might suggest multiple trees growing, some in a green median in the middle of the street, and others on either side of the river. G. K. Beale in his NGCNT commentary on Revelation notes that interpretation of taking EN MESW THS PLATEIAS AUTHS with verse 1. But he also suggests the sentence can begin with verse 2 (as with the UBS GNT, of course). He thinks one way to take it starting with verse 2 is the street and river running parallel with trees growing between them (so he would allow that the single tree could have multiplied). A third possibility he offers (the 2nd starting with verse 2) is that there is a single tree growing in the middle of the city’s street, and the tree is between either side of the river. This theory requires that the river diverged into two branches before reaching the tree. Fourthly, he suggests that even if one starts a new sentence at verse 2, the possibility of a river running down the middle of the street still exists. He seems to mistakenly cite the NIV and RSV for this fourth idea, but perhaps he is just citing those versions to establish the idea as presented in the first interpretation. He also does not say where the tree is under this last view, but presumably it is growing on either side of the river, as in the first view.>Any other thoughts?HH: If you allow that the tree of life could be a species of tree that could exist in multiple specimens, then the majority interpretation could work fine. Is a single tree adequate for the healing of all the nations (Rev 22:2)? That might tax its leaf system. Even with twelve crops a year one tree would not produce that much fruit for the whole world, and all believers will have a right to eat of it (Rev 2:7; 22:19). However, the vision may be somewhat figurative of spiritual realities. So I am content whether it is a single tree or a forest.Yours,Harold Holmyard

 

[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2[] The Tree of Life in Rev. 22:2

[] Rev. 22:1-2 Webb webb at selftest.net
Tue Nov 28 21:34:22 EST 2006

 

[] Please delete me from the mail-list [] I need help with an adverbial/participle clause Dear Listees, I note that there was a discussion of this passage a few years ago on thelist. I have a proposal for how to understand it that I’d like the group’sfeedback on. KAI EDEIXEN MOI POTAMON hUDATOS ZWHS LAMPRON hWS KRUSTALLON EKPOREUOMENON EK TOU QRONOU TOU QEOU KAI TOU ARNIOU EN MESWi THS PLATEIASAUTHS KAI TOU POTAMOU ENTEUQEN KAI EKEIQEN XULON ZWHS And he showed me the river of the water of life, as bright as crystal.It was coming out from the throne of God and of the Lamb, in the middle ofits main street.And from the river [to the main street], on either side [of the river], wasthe tree of life. This seems to make good sense to me, both conceptually, in terms ofplausible placement of things, and grammatically.So we have a pretty main street with a river down the center of it: cominglanes, trees, river, trees, going lanes. Any comments? I take it that there aren’t any major difficulties withputting 2a on the end of 1-people more competent in Greek than I have takenit that way. Webb Mealy

 

[] Please delete me from the mail-list[] I need help with an adverbial/participle clause

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