Revelation 9:14

[] Rev. 9:14 Ron Snider ronpt at comcast.net
Thu Dec 25 14:26:15 EST 2003

 

[] MARIAM in Luke 1:46 [] Rev. 9:14 The Greek of this verse runs as follows:luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalwEufrate.I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to beconstrued with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence doesnot appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe theprepositional phrase with the participle DEO.Any insight will be appreciated.Ron Snider

 

[] MARIAM in Luke 1:46[] Rev. 9:14

[] Rev. 9:14 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Thu Dec 25 17:37:47 EST 2003

 

[] Rev. 9:14 [] REv 9:17 In a message dated 12/25/2003 2:27:03 PM Eastern Standard Time, ronpt at comcast.net writes:> The Greek of this verse runs as follows:> > luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalw> Eufrate.> > I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to be> construed with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence does> not appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe the> prepositional phrase with the participle DEO.> ________That’s putting a lot of distance between a verb and the preposition. DEW signifies “to bind” either literally or figuratively. In Mt 22.13 the wedding guest without a wedding garment is ordered to be bound “hand and foot” (acc.).Ignatius in his Epistle to the Ephesians says he was bound “because of the name” EN TWi ONOMATI (http://www.ccel.org/l/lake/fathers/ignatius-ephesians.htm#III)In his Epistle to the Romans he says he was bound to ten leopards by which he states he is referring to the soldiers (http://www.ccel.org/l/lake/fathers/ignatius-romans.htm#V). Here again the leopards to whom he is bound are in the acc.In Re 9.14 it would seem that the EPI is a locative usage meaning bound “at the river.” In this case the “binding” is probably signifying being “assigned to the river . . . “gfsomsel

 

[] Rev. 9:14[] REv 9:17

[] Rev. 9:14 Ron Snider ronpt at comcast.net
Thu Dec 25 14:26:15 EST 2003

 

[] MARIAM in Luke 1:46 [] Rev. 9:14 The Greek of this verse runs as follows:luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalwEufrate.I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to beconstrued with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence doesnot appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe theprepositional phrase with the participle DEO.Any insight will be appreciated.Ron Snider

 

[] MARIAM in Luke 1:46[] Rev. 9:14

[] Rev. 9:14 Polycarp66 at aol.com Polycarp66 at aol.com
Thu Dec 25 17:37:47 EST 2003

 

[] Rev. 9:14 [] REv 9:17 In a message dated 12/25/2003 2:27:03 PM Eastern Standard Time, ronpt at comcast.net writes:> The Greek of this verse runs as follows:> > luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalw> Eufrate.> > I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to be> construed with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence does> not appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe the> prepositional phrase with the participle DEO.> ________That’s putting a lot of distance between a verb and the preposition. DEW signifies “to bind” either literally or figuratively. In Mt 22.13 the wedding guest without a wedding garment is ordered to be bound “hand and foot” (acc.).Ignatius in his Epistle to the Ephesians says he was bound “because of the name” EN TWi ONOMATI (http://www.ccel.org/l/lake/fathers/ignatius-ephesians.htm#III)In his Epistle to the Romans he says he was bound to ten leopards by which he states he is referring to the soldiers (http://www.ccel.org/l/lake/fathers/ignatius-romans.htm#V). Here again the leopards to whom he is bound are in the acc.In Re 9.14 it would seem that the EPI is a locative usage meaning bound “at the river.” In this case the “binding” is probably signifying being “assigned to the river . . . “gfsomsel

 

[] Rev. 9:14[] REv 9:17

[] Rev. 9:14 mrt mrt at hisurfer.net
Thu Dec 25 19:40:52 EST 2003

 

[] Rev. 9:14 [] Rev. 9:14 Rather than saying “Most construe the prepositional phrase with theparticiple DEW.” I would hope all do. When we have a verb right next to aprep. that affords us natural syntax this should be taken. It seems yoursource of wants to force a particular reading/interpretation. As Polycarpbasically said… that’s putting a lot of distance between a verb (LUW) andthe preposition.Prepositions commonly show how a verb is connected to various objects. Inthese cases i.e. when they modify verbs – they frequently answer questionsof how, when, where etc. Here EPI is telling us *where* the angels arebound, namely – at, near, by the E’ river.Merry Christmas!Michael TarverDEDEMAI EPI WREGON YSA<‘>< laus Deo—– Original Message —– From: “Ron Snider” <ronpt at comcast.net>To: “” < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Thursday, December 25, 2003 11:26 AMSubject: [] Rev. 9:14> The Greek of this verse runs as follows:> > luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalw> Eufrate.> > I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to be> construed with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence does> not appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe the> prepositional phrase with the participle DEO.> > Any insight will be appreciated.> > Ron Snider> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/

 

[] Rev. 9:14[] Rev. 9:14

[] Rev. 9:14 mrt mrt at hisurfer.net
Thu Dec 25 19:40:52 EST 2003

 

[] Rev. 9:14 [] Rev. 9:14 Rather than saying “Most construe the prepositional phrase with theparticiple DEW.” I would hope all do. When we have a verb right next to aprep. that affords us natural syntax this should be taken. It seems yoursource of wants to force a particular reading/interpretation. As Polycarpbasically said… that’s putting a lot of distance between a verb (LUW) andthe preposition.Prepositions commonly show how a verb is connected to various objects. Inthese cases i.e. when they modify verbs – they frequently answer questionsof how, when, where etc. Here EPI is telling us *where* the angels arebound, namely – at, near, by the E’ river.Merry Christmas!Michael TarverDEDEMAI EPI WREGON YSA<‘>< laus Deo—– Original Message —– From: “Ron Snider” <ronpt at comcast.net>To: “” < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Thursday, December 25, 2003 11:26 AMSubject: [] Rev. 9:14> The Greek of this verse runs as follows:> > luson tous tessaras avggelous tous dedemenous epi. tw potamw tw megalw> Eufrate.> > I have seen a suggestion that the prepositional phrase EPI… is to be> construed with the verb LUO, but the normal reading of the sentence does> not appear to me to make this a strong option. Most construe the> prepositional phrase with the participle DEO.> > Any insight will be appreciated.> > Ron Snider> >> home page: http://metalab.unc.edu/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/

 

[] Rev. 9:14[] Rev. 9:14

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