Romans 1:26

GlennDean » July 23rd, 2013, 9:47 am

I have a question on the αἵ and the παρὰ in Romans 1:26. Here’s the text:διὰ τοῦ παρέδωκεν αὐτοὺς ὁ θεὸς εἰς πάθη ἀτιμίας, αἵ τε γὰρ θήλειαι αὐτῶν μετήλλαξαν τὴν φυσικὴν χρῆσιν εἰς τὴν παρὰ φύσινQuestion1: In my UBS Greek NT with Texual Notes, it mentions that “ἡ θῆλυς” means “woman”, from which I take that in the above verse θήλειαι has a definite article, but I don’t see one (unless somehow the αἵ is acting as the definite article (but then wouldn’t the word be αἱ)

Question 2: παρὰ with the object of the preposition in the accusative typically means “alongside of”, but I’ve also read it can be used as a comparison (as in Romans 1:25, where they compare the quantities “the creation” and “the Creator” and they translate παρὰ as “instead of”). But here in 1:26, how is it being used?

Glenn

David Lim » July 23rd, 2013, 11:34 pm

GlennDean wrote:I have a question on the αἵ and the παρὰ in Romans 1:26. Here’s the text:διὰ τοῦ παρέδωκεν αὐτοὺς ὁ θεὸς εἰς πάθη ἀτιμίας, αἵ τε γὰρ θήλειαι αὐτῶν μετήλλαξαν τὴν φυσικὴν χρῆσιν εἰς τὴν παρὰ φύσιν

Hmm your text has a strange difficult textual variant, which stumped me until I looked at other variants. ;)
Here is the usual text:
[Rom 1:25-26] οιτινες μετηλλαξαν την αληθειαν του θεου εν τω ψευδει και εσεβασθησαν και ελατρευσαν τη κτισει παρα τον κτισαντα ος εστιν ευλογητος εις τους αιωνας αμην δια τουτο παρεδωκεν αυτους ο θεος εις παθη ατιμιας αι τε γαρ θηλειαι αυτων μετηλλαξαν την φυσικην χρησιν εις την παρα φυσιν

GlennDean wrote:Question 2: παρὰ with the object of the preposition in the accusative typically means “alongside of”, but I’ve also read it can be used as a comparison (as in Romans 1:25, where they compare the quantities “the creation” and “the Creator” and they translate παρὰ as “instead of”). But here in 1:26, how is it being used?

I view both usages as essentially the same, denoting a contrasting comparison; “served the creation in contrast to the one who created” and “exchanged the natural use for that which is in contrast to nature”.

GlennDean wrote:You wouldn’t know if the παρὰ φύσιν is an idiom (i.e meaning “unnatural”), or is there a logical way to translate εἰς τὴν παρὰ φύσιν

“την παρα φυσιν” in this context implies “την παρα φυσιν χρησιν”, which can be taken literally as above, so I don’t consider it an idiom.

Stephen Carlson » July 24th, 2013, 10:17 am
GlennDean wrote:Question 2: παρὰ with the object of the preposition in the accusative typically means “alongside of”, but I’ve also read it can be used as a comparison (as in Romans 1:25, where they compare the quantities “the creation” and “the Creator” and they translate παρὰ as “instead of”). But here in 1:26, how is it being used?

Prepositions have so many specialized senses that it’s helpful to look in a lexicon to get a sense of its full range. According to BDAG, sense 6, παρά can mean “against” or “contrary”. (This looks like an extension of sense 3 “more than” or “beyond” to me).

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