2 Peter 3:12

2 Peter 3:12 – PROSDOKWNTAS KAI SPEUDONTAS THN PAROUSIAN THS TOU QEOU hHMERASIs it possible to take the participles as a sort of hendiadys and PAROUSIAN as an accusative of respect and understand the sense to the effect of “with eager anticipation working diligently as regards the coming of the day of God” or such?

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2 thoughts on “2 Peter 3:12

  1. "Barry H." says:

    ?
    —– Original Message —–
    Sent: Saturday, February 12, 2011 1:10 AM

    Why? The accusative of respect or adverbial accusative is a category
    applied when there is no other good explanation for the accusative in a
    particular context. Here you have 2 perfectly good active participles both
    of which are capable of taking a direct object in the accusative. As for a
    hendiadys, that’s normally two nouns in the same case, one essentially
    modifying the other to form one concept. Occam’s razor surely cuts straight
    here — why create improbable explanations for the text when normal usage
    does so nicely?

    N.E. Barry Hofstetter, semper melius Latine sonat…
    Classics and Bible Instructor, TAA
    http://www.theamericanacademy.net
    (2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner)
    V-P of Academic Affairs, TNARS

    href=”mailto:bhofstetter@tnars.net”>bhofstetter@tnars.net
    http://www.tnars.net

    http://my.opera.com/barryhofstetter/blog
    http://mysite.verizon.net/nebarry

  2. "Barry H." says:

    ?
    —– Original Message —–
    Sent: Saturday, February 12, 2011 1:10 AM

    Why? The accusative of respect or adverbial accusative is a category
    applied when there is no other good explanation for the accusative in a
    particular context. Here you have 2 perfectly good active participles both
    of which are capable of taking a direct object in the accusative. As for a
    hendiadys, that’s normally two nouns in the same case, one essentially
    modifying the other to form one concept. Occam’s razor surely cuts straight
    here — why create improbable explanations for the text when normal usage
    does so nicely?

    N.E. Barry Hofstetter, semper melius Latine sonat…
    Classics and Bible Instructor, TAA
    http://www.theamericanacademy.net
    (2010 Salvatori Excellence in Education Winner)
    V-P of Academic Affairs, TNARS

    href=”mailto:bhofstetter@tnars.net”>bhofstetter@tnars.net
    http://www.tnars.net

    http://my.opera.com/barryhofstetter/blog
    http://mysite.verizon.net/nebarry

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