Matthew 26:2

[] Easter question George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 16:39:16 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek. georgegfsomsel_________—– Original Message —-From: Mitch Larramore <mitchlarramore at yahoo.com>To: B Greek < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 4:29:54 PMSubject: [] Easter questionMy friend got an email from one of his friends inAthens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now Iknow she is not Jewish. Could someone explain howPASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note thatthe Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but arethey equivolent?Mitch LarramoreSugar Land, Texas____________________________________________________________________________________Bored stiff? Loosen up… Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.http://games.yahoo.com/games/front— home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.orghttp://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/ ____________________________________________________________________________________We won’t tell. Get more on shows you hate to love (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV’s Guilty Pleasures list.http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Steve Puluka steve at puluka.com
Sun Apr 1 16:51:34 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question on 4/1/07 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore at mitchlarramore at yahoo.com wrote:> My friend got an email from one of his friends in> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are> they equivolent?Pascha is the traditional term used for “Easter” among eastern Christians.Pascha is a transliteration into Greek of the Hebrew term for Passover.>From there it was also transliterated into church slavonic. Pascha is alsoused among English speaking orthodox in continuation of this tradition oftransliteration. Alternatively, the term Feast of Feasts is used or Feastof the Resurrection.The term Easter in English derives from the former pagan spring festival ofthe ancient German goddess Ostara (called Eostre in Anglo-Saxon).– Steve PulukaMasters Student, SS Cyril & Methodius SeminaryCantor, Holy Ghost Church, Mckees Rocks PAhttp://www.puluka.com

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Mitch Larramore mitchlarramore at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 16:29:54 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question My friend got an email from one of his friends inAthens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now Iknow she is not Jewish. Could someone explain howPASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note thatthe Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but arethey equivolent?Mitch LarramoreSugar Land, Texas ____________________________________________________________________________________Bored stiff? Loosen up… Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.http://games.yahoo.com/games/front

 

[] Easter question

[] Easter question Mitch Larramore mitchlarramore at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 18:45:45 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question — Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com> wrote:> on 4/1/07 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore at> mitchlarramore at yahoo.com wrote:> > > My friend got an email from one of his friends in> > Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now> I> > know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> > PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note> that> > the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but> are> > they equivolent?> > Pascha is the traditional term used for “Easter”> among eastern Christians.> Pascha is a transliteration into Greek of the Hebrew> term for Passover.What is the relationship between the Passover andEaster such that eastern Christians decided to use theword for the Jewish Passover as an equivolent for theChristian Easter? To me, these are two separatefestivals/holy days, having nothing in common exceptfor near proximity in time of celebration.Mitch LarramoreSugar Land, Texas ____________________________________________________________________________________The fish are biting. Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/arp/sponsoredsearch_v2.php

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 19:03:50 EDT 2007

 

[] PASCA [] Easter question If you read particularly the Gospel according to John you will note that he protrays Christ as the Paschal lamb and the events as clustering around Passover. There was an attempt to celebrate Easter in conjunction with the celebration of the Passover for this very reason. The problem for many in the Church was the desire to maintain the celebration of the resurrection on the first day of the week whereas Passover could fall on other days. georgegfsomsel_________—– Original Message —-From: Mitch Larramore <mitchlarramore at yahoo.com>To: Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com>; B Greek < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 6:45:45 PMSubject: Re: [] Easter question— Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com> wrote:> on 4/1/07 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore at> mitchlarramore at yahoo.com wrote:> > > My friend got an email from one of his friends in> > Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now> I> > know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> > PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note> that> > the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but> are> > they equivolent?> > Pascha is the traditional term used for “Easter”> among eastern Christians.> Pascha is a transliteration into Greek of the Hebrew> term for Passover.What is the relationship between the Passover andEaster such that eastern Christians decided to use theword for the Jewish Passover as an equivolent for theChristian Easter? To me, these are two separatefestivals/holy days, having nothing in common exceptfor near proximity in time of celebration.Mitch LarramoreSugar Land, Texas____________________________________________________________________________________The fish are biting. Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.http://searchmarketing.yahoo.com/arp/sponsoredsearch_v2.php— home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.orghttp://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/ ____________________________________________________________________________________TV dinner still cooling? Check out “Tonight’s Picks” on Yahoo! TV.http://tv.yahoo.com/

 

[] PASCA[] Easter question

[] Easter question Jeffrey B. Gibson jgibson000 at comcast.net
Sun Apr 1 20:03:33 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question Mitch Larramore wrote:> > What is the relationship between the Passover and> Easter such that eastern Christians decided to use the> word for the Jewish Passover as an equivolent for the> Christian Easter? To me, these are two separate> festivals/holy days, having nothing in common except> for near proximity in time of celebration.> To my knowledge, it is only English speaking countries that use the term “Easter” forthe celebration. And this has more to do with the fact that the feast fell in a monththat was named Eastrena by Aglo-Saxons, than much else. Though see Bæda Temp. Rat. xv.Jeffrey–Jeffrey B. Gibson, D.Phil. (Oxon)1500 W. Pratt Blvd.Chicago, Illinoise-mail jgibson000 at comcast.net

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Albert Pietersma albert.pietersma at sympatico.ca
Sun Apr 1 19:25:13 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question If you you check the first passover account in Ex 12, you will see that the LXX has PASXA (v.11), a transcription of the Aramaic term, rather than the Hebrew. This probably means that when the Hebrew Pentateuch was translated into Greek, Alexandrian Jews referred to the festival by that name.AlOn Apr 1, 2007, at 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore wrote:> My friend got an email from one of his friends in> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are> they equivolent?> > Mitch Larramore> Sugar Land, Texas> > > > _______________________________________________________________________ > _____________> Bored stiff? Loosen up…> Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.> http://games.yahoo.com/games/front>> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > —Albert Pietersma21 Cross Street,Weston ON Canada M9N 2B8Email: albert.pietersma at sympatico.caHomepage: http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~pietersm

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Kevin Riley klriley at alphalink.com.au
Sun Apr 1 20:06:32 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question ——-Original Message——- From: Mitch Larramore Date: 2/04/2007 8:45:55 AM — Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com> wrote: > on 4/1/07 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore at > mitchlarramore at yahoo.com wrote: > > > My friend got an email from one of his friends in > > Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now > I > > know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how > > PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note > that > > the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but > are > > they equivolent? > > Pascha is the traditional term used for “Easter” > among eastern Christians. > Pascha is a transliteration into Greek of the Hebrew > term for Passover. What is the relationship between the Passover and Easter such that eastern Christians decided to use the Word for the Jewish Passover as an equivolent for the Christian Easter? To me, these are two separate Festivals/holy days, having nothing in common except For near proximity in time of celebration. Mitch Larramore Sugar Land, Texas =================Apart from English speakers, I believe all Christians refer to Easter bysome form of the word “pascha”. Most Christians would tend to see Easter asPassover with added meaning. Kevin Riley

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Oun Kwon kwonbbl at gmail.com
Sun Apr 1 20:09:35 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question On 4/1/07, Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com> wrote:> <skipped>> > The term Easter in English derives from the former pagan spring festival of> the ancient German goddess Ostara (called Eostre in Anglo-Saxon).> >> Steve PulukaHi, Steve.There is no proof that the ‘Easter’ was derived from ‘Ostara’. Thatword is simply related (being based on ‘easter’ = sun risingdirection) does not prove that it is etymological root. I think thatsomeone in Britain wrote (was he Bede?) umteen hundred years ago is nomore than his brainy conjecture and serves as laughabledysinformation.Oun.

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question George F Somsel gfsomsel at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 20:10:22 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Purpose Clause uses Even in English the adjective “Paschal” can refer to either Passover or Easter. georgegfsomsel_________—– Original Message —-From: Kevin Riley <klriley at alphalink.com.au>To: B Greek < at lists.ibiblio.org>Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 8:06:32 PMSubject: Re: [] Easter question——-Original Message——- From: Mitch Larramore Date: 2/04/2007 8:45:55 AM — Steve Puluka <steve at puluka.com> wrote: > on 4/1/07 4:29 PM, Mitch Larramore at > mitchlarramore at yahoo.com wrote: > > > My friend got an email from one of his friends in > > Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now > I > > know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how > > PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note > that > > the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but > are > > they equivolent? > > Pascha is the traditional term used for “Easter” > among eastern Christians. > Pascha is a transliteration into Greek of the Hebrew > term for Passover. What is the relationship between the Passover and Easter such that eastern Christians decided to use the Word for the Jewish Passover as an equivolent for the Christian Easter? To me, these are two separate Festivals/holy days, having nothing in common except For near proximity in time of celebration. Mitch Larramore Sugar Land, Texas =================Apart from English speakers, I believe all Christians refer to Easter bysome form of the word “pascha”. Most Christians would tend to see Easter asPassover with added meaning.Kevin Riley— home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/ mailing list at lists.ibiblio.orghttp://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/ ____________________________________________________________________________________No need to miss a message. Get email on-the-go with Yahoo! Mail for Mobile. Get started.http://mobile.yahoo.com/mail

 

[] Easter question[] Purpose Clause uses

[] Easter question Mitch Larramore mitchlarramore at yahoo.com
Sun Apr 1 22:33:12 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question George wrote> > Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek.— harley486 at insightbb.com wrote:> No, its not. It’s Passover. “Easter” did not even> exist as “Easter” when> the bible was written. Dear Harley:I may not have been clear in my original question. Thegirl, who wrote KAI KALO PASCA to my friend, lives inGreece now. She was not referring to Ancient Greek.The Modern Greek word for Easter is indeedPASCA…I’ve confirmed that much with her. However,she had no idea why they use PASCA, just like many ofus don’t know the sure-enough history of the word “Easter.”Mitch LarramoreSugar Land, Texas ____________________________________________________________________________________It’s here! Your new message! Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.http://tools.search.yahoo.com/toolbar/features/mail/

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question harley486 at insightbb.com harley486 at insightbb.com
Sun Apr 1 23:09:16 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question No, its not. It’s Passover. “Easter” did not even exist as “Easter” whenthe bible was written. PASXA is what is translated as “Passover” and doesrefer to the Jewish holiday. and is the same holiday Jesus’ disciples andthe church celebrated in remembrance of Christ, for he said “Do this inremembrance of Me”. Some Christians do celebrate Passover instead ofeaster. I am one of those who do and it is because Jesus is the Passoverlamb. Passover is clearly a shadow of what would happen on the Cross andthen Jesus defeating death for us by rising from the dead. EarlyChristians only celebrated Passover and then Constantine tried to minglethe Christian celebration with a pagan tradition which fell near the sametime. The result was something which has meaning to most Christians inremembering the resurrection of Christ, but the painted eggs, Easterbunnies and the name Easter itself all come from the pagan worship of afalse goddess. The Greek word for Passover, PASXA is simply atransliteration of the same word in Hebrew.Hope this helps,Pia MikealOn Sun, 1 Apr 2007, George F Somsel wrote:> Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek.> > george> gfsomsel> _________> > > > —– Original Message —-> From: Mitch Larramore <mitchlarramore at yahoo.com>> To: B Greek < at lists.ibiblio.org>> Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 4:29:54 PM> Subject: [] Easter question> > > My friend got an email from one of his friends in> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are> they equivolent?> > Mitch Larramore> Sugar Land, Texas> > > > ____________________________________________________________________________________> Bored stiff? Loosen up…> Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.> http://games.yahoo.com/games/front>> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> > > > ____________________________________________________________________________________> We won’t tell. Get more on shows you hate to love> (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV’s Guilty Pleasures list.> http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265>> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question James Ernest j.d.ernest at bc.edu
Mon Apr 2 00:09:12 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question George has already pointed out the synchronism of the death of Jesuswith the Passover sacrifice in John’s gospel. See also 1 Cor. 5:11,KAI GAR TO PASCA hHMWN ETYQH CRISTOS (Christ our Passover wassacrificed for us).A look through the headings in the Lampe Patristic Greek Lexicon mightanswer the original question: . . . I. Passover . . . C. as type 1.of sacrifice of Christ . . . D. Christ as Christians’ Passover . . .H. Eucharist as Christian Passover . . . II. Easter . . . It seems astraightforward enough evolution. Melito of Sardis (or whoever wrotethe Peri Pascha) invented neither the typology, though he certainlyrang the changes on it, nor the annual observance. As far as I know,when the eventual victors in the Quartodeciman controversy wanted toseparate the timing of the Christian Pascha from that of the JewishPascha, because the Christian feast should always fall on the firstday of the week, they didn’t suggest *calling* it something else. “Dayof resurrection” is an alternative formula at least by the fourthcentury but not a substitute indicating rejection of the usual”Pascha.”As to how long it too early Christians to separate out distinctcommemorations of the events of the crucifixion-resurrectioncomplex–that’s a different question, but it seems the Gospel of Markeither already reflects the observance of Holy Week or else inspiresit.As to why some modern languages use derivatives of Pascha (e.g.,French Paques, with circumflex over the “a” representing the lost”s”), and other don’t, and where the Easter bunny came from, etc., –Idon’t expect our moderators would see those as questions for thislist.James Ernest

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Kevin Riley klriley at alphalink.com.au
Mon Apr 2 02:36:38 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question I think you will find that Pascha as a Christian celebration of Jesus’ deathand resurrection long predates Constantine. And I very much doubt we canblame Constantine for the bunnies or the eggs. I am happy to blameConstantine for some of the things I believe to be wrong with the Christianchurch, but let’s at least do so on an accurate factual basis. The wordEaster is pagan, as are the names of the days of the week and quite a numberof religious words – basically anything that is not Latin or Greek -although, many of those also come from the pre-Christian days and couldlegitimately be called ‘pagan’. So I don’t see that much can be made of that Pascha has meant the same as Easter [with or without the bunnies and/oreggs] for about 1900 years, so I can’t see much sense in denying that when aGreek says “pascha” s/he means much the same as we mean when we say “Easter” Kevin Riley ——-Original Message——- From: harley486 at insightbb.com Date: 2/04/2007 12:10:54 PM No, its not. It’s Passover. “Easter” did not even exist as “Easter” when The bible was written. PASXA is what is translated as “Passover” and does Refer to the Jewish holiday. And is the same holiday Jesus’ disciples and The church celebrated in remembrance of Christ, for he said “Do this in Remembrance of Me”. Some Christians do celebrate Passover instead of Easter. I am one of those who do and it is because Jesus is the Passover Lamb. Passover is clearly a shadow of what would happen on the Cross and Then Jesus defeating death for us by rising from the dead. Early Christians only celebrated Passover and then Constantine tried to mingle The Christian celebration with a pagan tradition which fell near the same Time. The result was something which has meaning to most Christians in Remembering the resurrection of Christ, but the painted eggs, Easter Bunnies and the name Easter itself all come from the pagan worship of a False goddess. The Greek word for Passover, PASXA is simply a Transliteration of the same word in Hebrew. Hope this helps, Pia Mikeal On Sun, 1 Apr 2007, George F Somsel wrote: > Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek. > > George > gfsomsel > _________ >

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question Eric Weiss papaweiss1 at yahoo.com
Mon Apr 2 07:17:08 EDT 2007

 

[] Purpose Clause uses [] Easter question > My friend got an email from one of his friends in> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are> they equivolent?> > Mitch Larramore> Sugar Land, TexasThis year the Orthodox Pascha coincides with the Catholic/Protestant Easter. Usually they are on different Sundays. Your friend should email in response (but use the Greek letters, not the transliteration scheme):CRISTOS ANESTH (pronounced: Christos Anesti in Modern Greek)orCRISTOS ANESTH EK NEKRWNQANATWi QANATON PATHSASKAI TOIS EN TOIS MNHMASIZWHN CARISAMENOSwhich are the words to the chant that is repeated endlessly at the Pascha service, which commences shortly before midnight Saturday night and extends to nearly dawn when the Lenten + Holy Week fast is broken.Books on church history should explain the use of the term “Pascha” and “Easter,” and the quartodeciman controversy over when to celebrate it.But that’s not a Greek grammar/meaning topic. Eric S. Weiss ———————————Expecting? Get great news right away with email Auto-Check.Try the Yahoo! Mail Beta.

 

[] Purpose Clause uses[] Easter question

[] Easter question Curtis Hinson curtis at curtishinson.com
Mon Apr 2 09:22:35 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] Easter question ALIQOS ANESTI!I wonder why you’re saying it’s not Greek to say PASCA for Easter, simply because this wasn’t done in biblical times? Do you claim to have authority over what Greeks may say today because you’ve read books about the ancient Greek language during the Koine period?We’re talking about a living Greek person here, not what people would have said in NT times. Words do evolve over time and take on new meanings. Whatever other considerations are mentioned here are no concern to Greeks when they wish one another a good Pascha. Nor do they concern us on this list.Bless the NameCurtis Hinsonhttp://curtishinson.comharley486 at insightbb.com wrote the following on 4/1/2007 10:09 PM:> No, its not. It’s Passover. “Easter” did not even exist as “Easter” when> the bible was written. PASXA is what is translated as “Passover” and does> refer to the Jewish holiday. and is the same holiday Jesus’ disciples and> the church celebrated in remembrance of Christ, for he said “Do this in> remembrance of Me”. Some Christians do celebrate Passover instead of> easter. I am one of those who do and it is because Jesus is the Passover> lamb. Passover is clearly a shadow of what would happen on the Cross and> then Jesus defeating death for us by rising from the dead. Early> Christians only celebrated Passover and then Constantine tried to mingle> the Christian celebration with a pagan tradition which fell near the same> time. The result was something which has meaning to most Christians in> remembering the resurrection of Christ, but the painted eggs, Easter> bunnies and the name Easter itself all come from the pagan worship of a> false goddess. The Greek word for Passover, PASXA is simply a> transliteration of the same word in Hebrew.> > Hope this helps,> > Pia Mikeal> > On Sun, 1 Apr 2007, George F Somsel wrote:> > >> Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek.>> >> george>> gfsomsel>> _________>> >> >> >> —– Original Message —->> From: Mitch Larramore <mitchlarramore at yahoo.com>>> To: B Greek < at lists.ibiblio.org>>> Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 4:29:54 PM>> Subject: [] Easter question>> >> >> My friend got an email from one of his friends in>> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I>> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how>> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that>> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are>> they equivolent?>> >> Mitch Larramore>> Sugar Land, Texas>> >> >> >> ____________________________________________________________________________________>> Bored stiff? Loosen up…>> Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.>> http://games.yahoo.com/games/front>>>> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/>> mailing list>> at lists.ibiblio.org>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>> >> >> >> ____________________________________________________________________________________>> We won’t tell. Get more on shows you hate to love>> (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV’s Guilty Pleasures list.>> http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265>>>> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/>> mailing list>> at lists.ibiblio.org>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>> >> > >> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >

 

[] Easter question[] Easter question

[] Easter question James Ernest j.d.ernest at bc.edu
Mon Apr 2 09:46:36 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] PASXA and SIKERA –transliteration from Hebrew On 4/2/07, Eric Weiss <papaweiss1 at yahoo.com> wrote:> Books on church history should explain the use of the term> “Pascha” and “Easter,” and the quartodeciman controversy> over when to celebrate it.Right. A good start: the article “Pasch, Paschal Controversy,” byThomas Finn, in Encyclopedia of Early Christianity, ed. EverettFerguson.James Ernest

 

[] Easter question[] PASXA and SIKERA –transliteration from Hebrew

[] Easter question frjsilver at optonline.net frjsilver at optonline.net
Mon Apr 2 18:23:20 EDT 2007

 

[] Easter question [] PASCA Dear Friends –PASCA is not a natively Greek word. It’s an exact transliteration of the **Aramaic** word for ‘Passover’ (_paskha_); that’s the word Jesus used in ordinary speech, and it’s what the NT uses. In Hebrew, ‘Passover’ is _pesakh_Over these last twenty centuries or so of Christian history, there have been people, some Orthodox Christian Greeks among them, who mistakenly thought that PASCA shared an etymology with PASCW, for reasons which must be obvious given the NT’s sequence of events eventuating in Jesus’s death and resurrection.The semitic provenance of PASCA is thoroughly well attested and undisputed now except by some aggressively ignorant types — but that’s clearly not their only trouble…. [[;-D33The oddest thing about the term ‘Easter’ is that — in addition to its association with a prechristian Spring deity — it appears in the most ancient English-language translations of the gospels with the meaning ‘Passover’. That’s pretty clearly wrong, too, and this is a very old problem.If anyone would like to have a copy of my ‘Meditations on the Services of Passion Week’, which includes some discussion of this among other points of language and practice, please write me off-list and I’ll send it right along.KALO PASCA! KALH ANASTASIS!Peace and blessings of these holy days to all!Father James SilverMonk JamesOrthodox Church in America—– Original Message —–From: Curtis Hinson Date: Monday, April 2, 2007 9:22 amSubject: Re: [] Easter questionTo: harley at quasar.no-ip.org, > ALIQOS ANESTI!> > I wonder why you’re saying it’s not Greek to say PASCA for > Easter, > simply because this wasn’t done in biblical times? Do you claim > to have > authority over what Greeks may say today because you’ve read > books about > the ancient Greek language during the Koine period?> > We’re talking about a living Greek person here, not what people > would > have said in NT times. Words do evolve over time and take on > new > meanings. Whatever other considerations are mentioned here are > no > concern to Greeks when they wish one another a good Pascha. Nor > do they > concern us on this list.> > Bless the Name> Curtis Hinson> http://curtishinson.com> > harley486 at insightbb.com wrote the following on 4/1/2007 10:09 PM:> > No, its not. It’s Passover. “Easter” did not even exist as > “Easter” when> > the bible was written. PASXA is what is translated as > “Passover” and does> > refer to the Jewish holiday. and is the same holiday Jesus’ > disciples and> > the church celebrated in remembrance of Christ, for he said > “Do this in> > remembrance of Me”. Some Christians do celebrate Passover > instead of> > easter. I am one of those who do and it is because Jesus is > the Passover> > lamb. Passover is clearly a shadow of what would happen on > the Cross and> > then Jesus defeating death for us by rising from the dead. Early> > Christians only celebrated Passover and then Constantine tried > to mingle> > the Christian celebration with a pagan tradition which fell > near the same> > time. The result was something which has meaning to most > Christians in> > remembering the resurrection of Christ, but the painted eggs, Easter> > bunnies and the name Easter itself all come from the pagan > worship of a> > false goddess. The Greek word for Passover, PASXA is simply a> > transliteration of the same word in Hebrew.> >> > Hope this helps,> >> > Pia Mikeal> >> > On Sun, 1 Apr 2007, George F Somsel wrote:> >> > > >> Yes, PASXA is “Easter” in Greek.> >>> >> george> >> gfsomsel> >> _________> >>> >>> >>> >> —– Original Message —-> >> From: Mitch Larramore > >> To: B Greek > >> Sent: Sunday, April 1, 2007 4:29:54 PM> >> Subject: [] Easter question> >>> >>> >> My friend got an email from one of his friends in> >> Athens, Greece. She signed it KAI KALO PASCA. Now I> >> know she is not Jewish. Could someone explain how> >> PASCA is the Greek equivolent of Easter? I note that> >> the Passover occurs near in time to Easter, but are> >> they equivolent?> >>> >> Mitch Larramore> >> Sugar Land, Texas> >>> >>> >>> >> > ____________________________________________________________________________________>> Bored stiff? Loosen up…> >> Download and play hundreds of games for free on Yahoo! Games.> >> http://games.yahoo.com/games/front> >> —> >> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> >> mailing list> >> at lists.ibiblio.org> >> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >>> >>> >>> >> > ____________________________________________________________________________________>> We won’t tell. Get more on shows you hate to love> >> (and love to hate): Yahoo! TV’s Guilty Pleasures list.> >> http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/265> >> —> >> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> >> mailing list> >> at lists.ibiblio.org> >> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >>> >> > >> > —> > home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> > mailing list> > at lists.ibiblio.org> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/> >> > >> home page: http://www.ibiblio.org/> mailing list> at lists.ibiblio.org> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/>

 

[] Easter question[] PASCA

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